Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

1540 results

Article

Froebel 과 Montessori 의 유아 수학교육론의 비교 [Comparison of Froebel's and Montessori's Early Childhood Mathematics Education Theories]

Available from: RISS

Publication: 유아교육연구 / Korean Journal of Early Childhood Education, vol. 3, no. 1

Pages: 37-51

See More

Language: Korean

ISSN: 1226-9565, 2733-9637

Book Section

Addressing Classism in Early Childhood Education: How Social-Class Sensitive Pedagogy and the Montessori Method Can Work Together

Available from: Emerald Insight

Book Title: Discussions on Sensitive Issues (Advances in Early Education and Day Care, vol. 19)

Pages: 113-135

See More

Abstract/Notes: Classist perspectives embedded in our meritocratic society permeate early childhood education. Curricula, instructional practices, and classroom interactions have the potential to send messages to children about who and what is valued by society; frequently influenced by the characteristics and abilities of a middle-class child. In order to best serve the needs and abilities of children from any social class, early childhood educators should be well versed in social-class sensitive pedagogy, a pedagogy that helps teachers to be inclusive of social class diversity in their classrooms. This chapter argues that aspects of Montessori theory, such as the four planes of development and the prepared adult, complement social-class sensitive pedagogy in ways that all early childhood educators may apply to their own teaching.

Language: English

Published: Bingley, United Kingdom: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2015

ISBN: 978-1-78560-293-1 978-1-78560-292-4

Master's Thesis (M.A.)

A Case Study of Montessori Early Childhood and Head Start Curricular Alignment

Available from: American Montessori Society

Curricula, Curriculum planning, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Montessori method of education

See More

Language: English

Published: Moraga, California, 2016

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Impact of Creative Movement Presentations on Dance Participation and Student Attitudes Towards Dance in a Montessori Early Childhood Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Lower elementary, Montessori method of education, Movement education

See More

Abstract/Notes: This action research study examined the impact of creative movement presentations on dance participation and student attitudes towards dance in one outdoor Montessori early childhood classroom during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants were 13 kindergarten and lower elementary students, ages 5-8, and the researcher, their teacher. Students were presented creative movement activities eight times during circle time over four weeks. They were also given opportunities to dance freely once a week for six weeks and asked three times to respond to statements regarding their attitudes towards dance; pre-intervention, mid-intervention, and post-intervention. Data was collected using observations of dance participation, field notes about circle time presentations, and student self-assessment regarding their attitudes towards dance. There was some improvement in attitudes towards dance and an increase in dance participation. Many children expressed enjoyment and the researcher felt inclined to continue providing free dance opportunities and creative movement presentations at circle. The researcher encourages other educators to incorporate dance opportunities in class free time and curriculum lessons.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2021

Doctoral Dissertation

The Roots and Legacies of Four Key Women Pioneers in Early Childhood Education: A Theorectical and Philosophical Discussion

Available from: British Library - EthOS

Margaret McMillan - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Rachel McMillan - Biographic sources, Susan Isaacs - Biographic sources

See More

Abstract/Notes: Philosophical, theoretical and scientific interest in early childhood has a very long history. The idea that the early years are the foundation of children's long term prospects is one of the most ancient, enduring and influencing themes shaping early childhood policy and provision today. The motivation and purpose for this study stems from a desire to de-familiarise that which is already known in order to reflect upon, and identify new understandings of early childhood education in relation to universal values and beliefs concerning young children's learning and development. Using an interpretative paradigm, which Habermas (1984, p.109) would describe as a "double hermeneutic" as the process involves striving to re- interpret the already interpreted world, I argue that the principles, practices and provision of early childhood education in the United Kingdom today have strong roots in the innovative pedagogies of four influential women of the 19th and 20th century: Margaret and Rachel McMillan, Maria Montessori and Susan Isaacs. This study adopts a historical stance and firstly examines how early childhood education began through exploring and reflecting upon the early philosophers of the past whose ideas, values and beliefs were influential in shaping the key women pioneers' thinking. The study then moves on to examines the roots and legacies of the four women and the contribution they each made to early childhood education today. The contribution of my thesis to current knowledge and understanding of early childhood education lies firstly in the way I have synthesised the lives and work of the four women who form the focus of this thesis and secondly, in my demonstration of the way much of what constitutes effective early childhood provision has been shaped through the course of history.

Language: English

Published: Sheffield, England, 2011

Report

Preschoolers' Attitudes Toward Their Respective Early Childhood Programs

See More

Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to compare the attitudes of preschool children toward their program experiences and school adjustment, in order to ascertain whether differences existed among program type, age, and gender variables. A total of 90 preschool boys and girls 3 to 5 years of age from a church-related program, a Montessori program, and a Head Start program participated in the study. Children were surveyed using a self-report instrument, and teachers rated the children's adjustment to school environments. Results indicated that the attitudes toward program experiences of those children in the church-related program were different from those of children in the Montessori and Head Start programs. Results suggest that, in view of the increased emphasis on early childhood programs and the establishment of numerous preschool programs, such programs for young children should be evaluated from many points of view, including that of the preschool child.

Language: English

Published: [S.I.], 1986

Report

Longitudinal Findings for Early Childhood Programs: Focus on Direct Instruction

Academic achievement, Americas, Comparative education, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Longitudinal studies, Montessori method of education, North America, United States of America

See More

Abstract/Notes: This paper reports short- and long-term outcomes of the Direct Instruction Head Start and Follow Through program model. Based on the premise that positive reinforcement is essential to maximum academic success, the Direct Instruction program was developed from an academic preschool model which specified exactly what children needed in order to succeed academically and dictated how teachers should modify children's behavior. The Follow Through program was developed to provide programs for kindergarten through 3rd grade that would help maintain gains made in Head Start or other preschool programs. In 1983 the Follow Through program could be found in 60 American cities and a number of foreign countries. Research suggested that the Direct Instruction/Follow Through program had a positive effect on reading and mathematics achievement. However, third-graders who received direct instruction, more often than comparison children, attributed academic success to external factors and failure to themselves. They also scored lower than children receiving cognitive developmental instruction on a test of nonverbal problem-solving. Longitudinal findings suggested that students receiving direct instruction had lower grade retention and higher attendance and graduation rates. Longitudinal comparison of direct instruction, Montessori, DARCEE, and traditional preschool programs revealed positive outcomes for children who received direct instruction: Follow Through children achieved at grade level when they were in the ninth grade.

Language: English

Published: [S.I.], Jun 1987

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Impact of Montessori Teaching Methods on Developmental Domains in Early Childhood Education in Lagos State, Nigeria

Available from: Jereda Journal

Publication: Journal of Educational Research in Developing Areas (JEREDA), vol. 4, no. 1

Pages: 113-122

Africa, Child development, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Nigeria, Sub-Saharan Africa, West Africa

See More

Abstract/Notes: Introduction: Early Childhood Education and development is a start to life and a reliable foundation to continuing education. One of the reasons that early childhood is regarded up to the age of eight is to enable children acquire a smooth understanding of the entire education from the level of play group to pre-primary and from pre-primary to the level of primary. Purpose of the Study: The main purpose of this study is to examine the impact of Montessori teaching methods on the developmental domain of young children in early childhood schools in Lagos state. Methodology: Descriptive survey research design was adopted. Sample size of two (12) schools of 10 pupils each in the selected schools was employed using convenience sampling technique. Validated questionnaire was used for data collection. The collected data was analyzed using descriptive statistics which involves measures of central tendency descriptive statistics (frequency and percentage). Results: Findings indicate that there is higher impact of Montessori teaching methods on the literacy skills in early childhood education. Pupils from both Montessori and Non-Montessori schools perform equally better in Numeracy Skills. The impact of conventional method of teaching on reasoning skill is better than that of Montessori Method of teaching. Conclusion: In conclusion, many aspects of Montessori teaching methods positively consider children's developmental needs and should be an integral part of teachers’ working modalities in so-called “non-Montessori teaching methods (conventional public schools)” (such as the possibility for each child to be in multi-age classes; to have an absence of explicit, formal grades, rewards, or punishments; and a low teacher-student ratio). Recommendations: Based on the results of this study, it is therefore recommended that Montessori system of education may be used to improve language skills of children and to understand art of language at early childhood level.

Language: English

DOI: 10.47434/JEREDA.4.1.2023.113

ISSN: 2735-9107

Article

Spirituality in Early Childhood Education

Available from: He Kupu

Publication: He Kupu - The Word, vol. 3, no. 5

Pages: 16-22

Australasia, Australia and New Zealand, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., New Zealand, Oceania, Spirituality, Waldorf method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

See More

Abstract/Notes: Spirituality is an important dimension of the holistic development of young children, much like autonomy, resilience and responsibility. Unfortunately, it often remains as a forgotten area in early childhood education in many cultures (Zhang, 2012). Many people simply could not articulate the concept of spirituality concretely and some may confuse it with religion. Sokanovic and Muller (1999) pointed out that the definition of the term spirituality has little consensus of opinion throughout society, and has even, in specialised fields such as education, academia and religion sectors, various definitions. To explore the specific meaning of spirituality would be not only meaningful but of great significance for our understanding of the tenet of early childhood education and the national curriculum of New Zealand, Te Whāriki. Furthermore, spirituality is also a frequently discussed topic in many philosophies of early childhood education. For example, spiritual self or inner spirituality is recognised by Froebel and Pestalozzi (Froebel Web, 2014; Bruehlmeier, 2014), while spiritual development is further explored and integrated in teaching practices by Montessori and Steiner (Weinberg, 2009; Ullrich, 1994). Therefore, the task of this article is to try to define the term “spirituality” in the context of early childhood education, and explore spirituality as presented in the work of two early childhood theorists. Later, this article will also critically examine the aspect of spirituality in my own childhood education in China, and in relation to other contexts.

Language: English

ISSN: 1179 - 6812

Article

Autonomous Development in Early Childhood

Available from: He Kupu

Publication: He Kupu - The Word, vol. 3, no. 5

Pages: 4-10

Child development, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Education - History, Education - Philosophy, Jean-Jacques Rousseau - Philosophy, Learner autonomy, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Rudolf Steiner - Philosophy

See More

Abstract/Notes: Autonomy is a critical aspect of early childhood development. This article will introduce the concept of autonomy in the early years, as presented by philosophers such as Rousseau, Montessori and Steiner. The article will also examine how young children cultivate a sense of autonomy and possible influences that impact upon their development. Finally, I will critically reflect on autonomy in relation to my own childhood and in relation to diverse contexts.

Language: English

ISSN: 1179 - 6812

Advanced Search