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1044 results

Master's Thesis

A Study Comparing the Effect of Multiage Education Practices versus Traditional Education Practices on Academic Achievement

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: This study compared the effects of multi-age classroom strategies to those of traditional classroom strategies on the academic achievement of fourth grade students in reading and math. Standardized test scores from 20 fourth-grade students in two multi-age third- and fourth-grade classrooms were compared to the scores of 20 students from 7 traditional fourth-grade classrooms. The Stanford Achievement Test (SAT), ninth edition was used as the test instrument. Scores from the students' third grade test in the 1996-97 school year were compared to their scores from the fourth grade test in reading and math by applying T-tests to the data. Analysis of the data revealed no difference in reading or math achievement between students taught in a multi-age classroom and those from a traditional classroom.

Language: English

Published: Salem, West Virginia, 1998

Book

India, Democracy and Education: A Study of the Work of the Birla Education Trust

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Language: English

Published: Bombay: Orient Longmans, 1955

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Early Childhood Education According to Abdurrahman An-Nahlawi and Maria Montessori

Available from: Al-Athfal: Jurnal Pendidikan Anak

Publication: Al-Athfal: Jurnal Pendidikan Anak [Journal of Child Education], vol. 6, no. 2

Pages: 121-134

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Abstract/Notes: This research is motivated by the concept of Early Childhood Education offered by various educational figures to impact the emergence of increasingly dynamic educational theories. Issues on this concept did not escape the attention of Abdurrahman An-Nahlawi and Maria Montessori. The two figures have similarities and differences in their underlying points of view and approaches, and these cannot be separated from the philosophical study behind them. Based on the above, this study explores the two figures’ thoughts to give birth to a new paradigm of education for early childhood. The research method used was a literature study by collecting various references that can support research. From the research results, it can be found that, philosophically, the concept of Early Childhood Education, according to Abdurrahman An-Nahlawi, is attached to the perennial normative approach, while Maria Montessori’s notion is more towards a constructivism approach. The two approaches have different points of view in highlighting the educational side. The similarity in the points of view of these two figures is an understanding of the concept of education, which should be integrated and contextual, and position the child as the main subject in education.

Language: English

DOI: 10.14421/al-athfal.2020.62-03

ISSN: 2477-4189, 2477-4715

Article

Review: Hundred Years of Montessori Education: A Chronicle of Montessori Education in Switzerland

Publication: Communications (Association Montessori Internationale, 195?-2008), vol. 2008, no. 1

Pages: 85-87

Book reviews, Europe, Harald Ludwig - Writings, Western Europe, Western Europe, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 0519-0959

Article

Science Education and Scientific Education

Publication: NAMTA Quarterly, vol. 1, no. 1

Pages: 24-27

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Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation

Language Learning and Technology in and for a Global World

Available from: University of California eScholarship

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Abstract/Notes: More than ever before, schools and societies are looking to educate children in and for a global world. In the United States, these efforts have taken the form of increased interest in incorporating global or international perspectives into educational curricula, programs, and policy over the past decade (Hayden, 2011; Parker, 2011; U.S. Department of Education, 2012). Despite this interest in what I call global education, ambiguity remains regarding what it means to provide an education for a globalized world, both in terms of its underlying motivations and its ultimate execution in practice (Ortloff, Shah, Lou, & Hamilton, 2012).Two components often placed at the heart of these efforts in the United States—second/foreign language and digital technology—both reflect and contribute to understandings of global education. This study, rooted in an ecological theorization of discourse, asked how different school actors (teachers, administrators, parents, and students) position these two components in education today, how these positionings differ across groups, and what this means for understandings of global education. These questions were investigated through two complementary approaches: a survey distributed to a large cross-section of schools around the United States and an in-depth focal case study of one school. The survey was distributed to teachers, students, parents, and administrators at a broad range of U.S. secondary schools and assessed perceptions of second/foreign language and digital technology in education today. The focal case study focused on two secondary classrooms at a multilingual immersion K-8 school in the western US over a four-month period; data collection included field notes, analytic memos, and audio/video recordings from participant observations as well as multiple rounds of interviews with five students, four teachers, two administrators, and three parents. Data were analyzed using iterative rounds of inductive and deductive coding (Miles & Huberman, 1994; Saldaña, 2009) and critical discourse analysis (Blommaert, 2005; Fairclough, 2001).Findings suggest that second/foreign language and digital technology were positioned in a range of different ways that had concrete ramifications for schools and that built up divergent understandings of global education. The survey component of the study highlighted common discourses reproduced across groups, including: second/foreign language learning as a way to promote cultural understanding and awareness as well as economic opportunity; or digital technology as a threat to learning and as an omnipresent necessity. The focal school offered a more detailed look into these different discourses and their reproduction across groups. Analysis revealed trended similarities and differences across groups. For example, even though parents, teachers, and administrators often articulated a similar understanding of second/foreign language and digital technology, parental actions suggested more alignment with economic-based understandings of these two components. These differences in how second/foreign language and digital technology should be positioned within a global education created a “battle” between parents and the focal school as well as tension within the learning environment. The impact of these discourses and battles on students was unclear: while students at times voiced the discourses that their parents, teachers, and administrators reproduced, data also suggests that students were influenced by outside sources. These findings suggest that resulting understandings of global education were multiple and divergent across school groups. Data analysis also revealed the potential that anxiety, concern, or even fear of globalization and its effects could undergird adult understandings of second/foreign language and of digital technology: beneath economic as well as cultural motivations for second/foreign language and for digital technology learning resided trepidation about a changing world, changing identities, and the unknowns that lay ahead. This suggests that, underneath multiple and complex discourses, there can be a singular discourse that manifests in different ways, nuancing understandings of ecological approaches to discourse. It also suggests that different understandings of global education could stem from the same place: fear or anxiety in the face of a globalizing world. These findings highlight the need for a global education that equips students to navigate a changing world, its challenges, and any potential fears that may arise from these changes and challenges. The study concludes with a pedagogical framework built around discourse analysis that could offer students tools to understand their globalizing world.

Language: English

Published: Berkeley, California, 2017

Article

Montessori Secondary Education: Moving from Discipline-Based Education to Whole Formative Synthesis

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 33, no. 3

Pages: 223–241

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Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Evaluating Student Food Selections After a Nutrition Education Intervention in a Montessori Community School

Available from: The Annals of Family Medicine

Publication: The Annals of Family Medicine, vol. 20, no. Supplement 1

Pages: Submission 3129

Montessori schools, Nutrition education

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Abstract/Notes: Context: Schools are unique sites for nutrition education interventions due to their ability to provide educational activities as well as meals, allowing for observation of behavior change. Nutrition education and physical activity awareness programs implemented in the school setting have the potential to positively impact students’ eating habits. Eating habits are developed at a young age, but few efforts have been made to deliver and assess education interventions in the pre-K through grade 3 age group. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate student food selections before and after a nutrition education intervention was implemented in a Montessori school. Human Subjects Review: Approved as non-regulated research by the UTSW IRB. Study Design: Retrospective exploratory analysis. Setting: A single Montessori community school with students in grades pre-K through grade 3. Instrument: Aggregate lunch food selection data, including total food items offered and total food items left over, via daily production records. Main Outcome Measures: Records were collected from three school years to compare the food acceptability – the percent of food item taken from the total offered - of fruit (F), vegetable (V), F&V, 0% milk, 1% milk, and all milks before and after the implementation of the intervention program. Food acceptability served as a proxy for food consumption. Results: In all years, fruit (82.88%) and all milks (81.74%) were well accepted by students, but vegetables (62.00%) were not. The study found that from year 1 to year 2, there were statistically significant (p <0.0001) decreases in intake in all categories. This trend continued when comparing year 1 to year 3. Conclusions: Prior studies show that even in successful interventions, when vegetable or F&V intake does increase, changes are minimal. These findings corroborate the difficulties prior studies have demonstrated in changing students’ food selections for the better, particularly regarding vegetable consumption. This analysis of production records showed a decline in acceptability of foods over the three years. It is unclear if these changes are directly related to the instructional program, due to the presence of confounding factors. Future studies should attempt to reevaluate nutrition education and subsequently conduct a plate-waste study for a more accurate representation of food consumption before and after an intervention.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1370/afm.20.s1.3129

ISSN: 1544-1709, 1544-1717

Article

Special Education: Can Montessori Education Work for All?

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 5, no. 2

Pages: 8

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Conference Paper

Social Skills in Pre-schools Based on Montessori Education

Available from: IATED Digital Library

10th Annual International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation

Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Preschool children, Social emotional learning

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Abstract/Notes: The article informs the reader with the program of Montessori education and application of principles of Montessori education in conditions of Czech pre-schools (kindergartens). The authors focus on the formulation of the principles of this form of alternative education based on the study of works by M. Montessori and they further use them to research the level of social skills of pre-school children. Due to a fact that the educational approach at a Montessori kindergarten and a regular kindergarten differs, the authors also focus on the comparison of social skills among pre-school children of kindergartens of both abovementioned types. The quantitative design of the research was used. The questionnaires were submitted to 7 kindergartens: in 5 of them, children were educated by the principles of Montessori education, 2 of them were regular. The results linked to the pre-school children’s level of social skills were compared not only from the perspective of the type of kindergarten, but also from the perspective of children’s gender, siblings or the age when they started to attend the pre-school education.

Language: English

Published: Seville, Spain: International Academy of Technology, Education and Development (IATED), 2017

Pages: 8016-8024

DOI: 10.21125/iceri.2017.2142

ISBN: 978-84-697-6957-7

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