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Article

Hidden Black Voices in the History of Montessori Education

Available from: Academia

Publication: American Educational History Journal, vol. 47, no. 2

Pages: 205-221

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Maria Montessori was one of Italy's first female physicians, and she developed a groundbreaking educational method based on astute observation of children's behavior while working in one of the poorest neighborhoods in Rome (Gutek 2004; Kramer 1988). As someone who witnessed the extent of injustice experienced by poor women and children particularly, she turned from medicine to focus on education, seeing its potential power for social reform (Gutek 2004). Others have been drawn to the Montessori philosophy, sharing her belief that all children have the potential to become self-motivated, independent, and lifelong learners given an appropriate environment in which to flourish. Marginalized communities in the United States find this inclusivity to be a compelling message, leading to a growing number of public Montessori schools serving disadvantaged children (Debs 2019). The work and influence of Black Montessori educators is less wellknown than the stories of their white counterparts, so we profile three Black pioneers in the field. Before elaborating on the stories of Mae Arlene Gadpaille, Roslyn Williams, and Lenore Gertrude Briggs, Black Montessori pioneers who shared Maria Montessori's belief in the power of education for social justice, we first provide background on the Montessori Method, Maria Montessori's early years, and the history of Montessori education in the United States.

Language: English

ISSN: 1535-0584

Article

John McDermott and the Road to Montessori Public Schools

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 26, no. 3

Pages: 46-49

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: In this article, the author states that, for over 45 years, she has explored the issues of leadership and change, and, along the way, she has examined how diversity fits in with these ideas. She states that she found all three of these concepts embodied in the person of John McDermott, a leader in the American Montessori movement in the United States. McDermott helped establish the framework for putting Montessori education into an American cultural context. His message was always the need for public education, the necessity of embracing African-Americans and the poor in Montessori schools, and the damage to cities caused by white flight. McDermott held to his view that the quality of public education was key to the future of the republic. He decried the economic and social disparity between poor urban and inner-city schools and those of the affluent middle class, along with the ever-widening gap between the poor and the affluent and between blacks, Latinos, and whites. McDermott continued to stress the need to make Montessori education relevant to present problems, although he did not view Montessori education as a single solution to the problems in American education. He challenged the American Montessori Society to examine the ways in which growth and change occur in America.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Maria Montessori and Educational Forces in America

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 19, no. 1

Pages: 34-47

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: When Maria Montessori addressed two wildly enthusiastic American audiences at Carnegie Hall in December 1913, she thrilled the parents in attendance, but sent a shock wave through the educational establishment. Instead of accommodating skeptics from the teacher-training institutions seated there that night, she appealed directly to parents who found in the Montessori message an antidote to the miasma in their children's schools. Subsequently, the educational establishment that found more to dislike than to admire in Montessori marshaled their considerable power to discourage any permanent American Montessori movement for years to come. This article explores the clash between Montessori and optimistic American families versus the American educational establishment of the time. For further historical perspective, the author offers an analysis of the growth of the kindergarten movement and the emergence of progressivism in education as an outgrowth of the American Progressive movement at the turn of the 20th century. Maria Montessori's presentations at Carnegie Hall occurred at the apex of these convulsive forces.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

American Educational Methods and Some Foreign Innovations

Available from: NewsBank - San Diego Evening Tribune Historical

Publication: San Diego Evening Tribune (San Diego, California)

Pages: 4

Americas, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, North America, Panama-California Exposition (1915, San Diego, California), United States of America

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Language: English

Article

Yanzheng haishi zhiyi: Meiguo jiaoyu xuejie dui meng tai suo li jiaoyu de pipan / 验证还是质疑:美国教育学界对蒙台梭利教育的批判 [Verification or Questioning: American Educational Circles’ Criticism on Montessori Education]

Publication: Xueqian jiaoyu yanjiu / 学前教育研究 [Studies in Preschool Education], vol. 2019, no. 10

Pages: 24-31

Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: At the beginning of the 20th century, Montessori’s educational thought and practice disseminated to the United States in a short and concentrated way. This process was always accompanied by the questioning and criticism of Montessori education in the American educational circles. The in-depth analysis and inspiration of the questioning and criticisms are currently lacking in domestic and foreign research. Most of the educational psychologists, progressive education scholars, and Froebelians who dominated the American educational community were critical of Montessori education. American education scholars criticized Montessori education on two levels: fundamentals of philosophy and psychology, curriculum system. They believed that Montessori's education theory lagged behind the times, and the curriculum system ignored young children’s sociality, imagination and freedom. These criticisms reflected the cautious attitude of the American educational scholars who didn’t blindly follow the imported theory, and promoted the Americanization of Montessori education. At present, China’s educational academics are keen to interpret and verify when introducing western educational theories. This situation is not conducive to the creation of original educational theories. In order to change this situation, the Chinese educational scholars should first establish cultural self-confidence, treating western educational theories with an equal mindset and perspective; second discriminate and absorb the foreign educational theories on the basis of reflective criticism; third, root in China’s educational practice. In this way can the scholars better absorb western educational theories’ essence and promote the creation of original educational theories.

Language: Chinese

ISSN: 1007-8169

Article

Maria Montessori va in America. Una Rilettura Pedagogica di un Episodio di Incontro-Scontro tra Attivismo Pedagogico Italiano e Progressive Education Americana / Maria Montessori goes to America: A Pedagogical Reflection of an Encounter-Clash Between Italian Activism Movement and American Progressive Education

Available from: Formazione, Lavoro, Persona

Publication: Formazione, Lavoro, Persona, vol. 10 (Anno 4)

Pages: 1-10

Americas, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - History, North America, Progressive education, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The complex history of Montessori’s Method spreading in the United States was signed by some misunderstandings connected with the reform of the american education system. The Method wasn’t understood in its specificity, but it appeared, in the same time, an alternative or an application of the tradition of Froebel’s Kindergarten. In those years the American pedagogical reflection tried to create an alternative to the continental tradition. For this reason the Progressive Education critized Montessori (i.e. Kilpatrick) for her spiritual and metaphysical premises but this movement couldn’t realize this project and it was inevitably connected with the tradition of European Activism.

Language: Italian

ISSN: 2039-4039

Article

Il Congresso Montessori a Oakland: Il metodo educativo della Dr. Montessori discusso ed esaltato dagli insegnanti americani - L'opera della grande educatrice e i suoi frutti

Available from: California Digital Newspaper Collection

Publication: L'Italia (San Francisco, California)

Pages: 4

Americas, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Montessori Congress (Oakland, California, 1915), North America, United States of America

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Language: Italian

ISSN: 2637-5400

Archival Material Or Collection

Box 10, Folder 7 - Manuscripts, ca. 1921-ca.1966 - "A Visit to Lilliput or An American Montessori School in Action"

Available from: Seattle University

Americas, Edwin Mortimer Standing - Biographic sources, Edwin Mortimer Standing - Writings, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Language: English

Archive: Seattle University, Lemieux Library and McGoldrick Learning Commons, Special Collections

Book

Montessori for the Disadvantaged: An Application of Montesosri Educational Principles to the War on Poverty

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Language: English

Published: New York: Capricorn, 1967

Article

'Happiness Dwells in the Black Soul'

Publication: Los Angeles Sentinel (Los Angeles, California)

Pages: A7

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Hakim Jamal - Writings, Hakim Jamal - Writings, Malcolm X Foundation, Malcolm X Montessori School (Compton), Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Malcolm X once said: "Happiness resides not in possessions and not in gold ... the feeling of happiness dwells in the black soul."

Language: English

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