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1372 results

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

A Comparison of the Achievement Test Performance of Children Who Attended Montessori Schools and Those Who Attended Non-Montessori Schools in Taiwan

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

Asia, China, East Asia, Taiwan

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Abstract/Notes: There are two purposes of the current study. First was to examine whether or not children in the elementary school in Taiwan who had received Montessori early childhood education obtain significantly higher scores on tests of language arts, math, and social studies than children who attended non-Montessori pre-elementary programs. Second one was to examine whether or not the number years of Montessori education has a positive impact on the students' scores when they are in elementary grades. According to Chattin-McNichols (1992b), children from Montessori education program are doing better in some respects than other programs. Some studies have found that in the United States, Montessori students have strong academic outcomes especially in language arts than non-Montessori students (Daux, 1995; Hobbs, 2008; Lillard & Else-Quest, 2006; Manner, 1999). The present study involved 196 participants from a private Catholic elementary school in Taipei City, Taiwan. Ninety-eight first, second, and third grade students had Montessori early childhood experience and 98 first, second, and third grade students did not have Montessori early childhood experience. Using one-way MANOVA as a statistical tool, there were mixed results in the present study. The results showed students who had Montessori early childhood education experience had higher test scores of language arts than the students who did not have Montessori education experience. In conclusion, the present study partially supports the findings of other studies and shows that Montessori education has some long-term impact on the students' language arts learning.

Language: English

Published: Terre Haute, Indiana, 2009

Article

A Montessori High School: A Dream About to Become Reality [Barrie Day School, Silver Spring, MD]

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: The Constructive Triangle (1974-1989), vol. 8, no. 1

Pages: 21–44

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Language: English

ISSN: 0010-700X

Article

'The School Where the Children Live' [Hershey Montessori Farm School, Huntsburg, OH]

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 31, no. 1

Pages: 129–139

Erdkinder, Hershey Montessori Farm School (Huntsburg, Ohio), Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Junior High School Students Search for Roots in Italy [Santa Barbara, CA, Montessori School]

Publication: AMI/USA News, vol. 13, no. 4

Pages: 5

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Language: English

Article

Bluffview Montessori School in Winona, Minnesota–The Nation's First Montessori Charter School

Publication: AMI/USA News, vol. 6, no. 2

Pages: 12

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Language: English

Article

Scuola speciale e scuola integrata [Special school and integrated school]

Publication: Vita dell'Infanzia (Opera Nazionale Montessori), vol. 24, no. 6

Pages: 3-5

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, Marziola Pignatari - Writings, Montessori method of education, Special education

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Language: Italian

ISSN: 0042-7241

Article

Montessori Schools and Nursery Schools

Available from: The Times Educational Supplement Historical Archive - Gale

Publication: The Times Educational Supplement (London, England)

Pages: 353

, Spain

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Language: English

ISSN: 0040-7887

Article

A High School Model: Inside Cincinnati's Clark Montessori Secondary School

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 15, no. 3

Pages: 12

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

AMI School Launches Somalian Outreach [Mater Amoris Montessori School, Ashton, MD]

Publication: AMI/USA News, vol. 6, no. 3

Pages: 2

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Language: English

Book

The Parent-Centered Early School: Highland Community School of Milwaukee

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

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Abstract/Notes: In May, 1991, the newly chosen Milwaukee Public Schools Superintendent, Dr. Ho,vard Fuller, visited Highland Community School. His main question to parents and staff assembled to greet him was, "What lessons can we public school people learn from you?" Highland people had cogent ideas to pass on to him. This book is a more formal response in which I hope the hundreds of people who have continuously created Highland in its first twenty-five years speak through me in answer to him and to his colleagues elsewhere in public education. Highland began in late 1968, and by 1994 was one of only ten schools in the entire country to qualify for state-financed vouchers to independent urban schools. It is small: about seventy ethnically and economically diverse students aged two-and-a-half to ten years, three teachers and three assistants, a full-time executive director, and three part-time helpers, including a parent coordinator. One of the teachers doubles as principal. Annual expenditures per pupil are about $2,800. The curriculum is Montessori-based. The building is a century-old mansion. The school is governed by a nine-member parent board of directors and helped, primarily in fund-raising, by an advisory group of trustees. It is located in Milwaukee's Near West Side, an economically depressed and violent neighborhood (Jeffrey Dahmer's apartment, since razed, was only five blocks from the school). This is the story of a small school. Faced with the vastness of urban decay and its impact on educational institutions, the reader might question whether describing and analyzing this diminutive organization has any relevance to urban education. Despite differences between it and stereotypical urban public schools, however, it brings a message to American education much more important than its size seems to warrant. Its size is precisely the point. Change nucleates and incubates in small settings. Our huge society conditions us to think in terms of large numbers, sweeping change, vast federal programs. Government may be able to create contexts for change, but the changes themselves have to be brought about where individuals assemble to meet their mutual needs. Whether their relationships will be harmonious and productive, or acrimonious and dysfunctional, depends on how the organization is structured and what spirit has been breathed into it. This book fleshes out the organizational and attitudinal reasons that Highland works so well and what public education can learn from this small inner-city educational oasis. As a framework for the organization of this study, let us first review factors that research has revealed make a school effective.

Language: English

Published: New York, New York: Garland, 1997

Edition: 1st

ISBN: 978-1-315-05106-2

Series: Studies in Education and Culture , 10

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