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Book Section

Peace Education: Education and Peace

Book Title: The Bloomsbury Handbook of Montessori Education

Pages: 91-95

Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Maria Montessori - Writings, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - History, Peace education

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Abstract/Notes: This chapter examines Maria Montessori’s text, Education and Peace (1972) which was first published in 1949 in Italian. The text is a series of speeches she gave throughout Europe during the Interwar period of 1932-1939 and is divided into three parts. Part I is an introduction to Montessori’s vision for peace education. Part II collects the lectures from the Sixth International Montessori Congress in Copenhagen, 1937. Part III focuses on the lecture, “The Importance of Education in Bringing about Peace,” from an address to the International School of Philosophy in Amersfoort, 1937. The final section contains Montessori’s “Address to the World Fellowship of Faiths” in London, 1939. Montessori’s works assume a worldview where peace is the most natural state of consciousness and express her belief that humans can concretely address the fact that humanity seems to be devolving into greater forms of violence instead of advancing toward peace.

Language: English

Published: New York, New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2023

ISBN: 978-1-350-27561-4 978-1-350-27560-7 978-1-350-27562-1

Series: Bloomsbury Handbooks

Article

Education for Life [Montessori Special Education School of Cleveland, OH]

Publication: Montessori Special News, vol. 3, no. 1

Pages: 1

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Language: English

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Montessori Approach in Character Education in Early Childhood Education

Available from: Journal of Positive School Psychology

Publication: Journal of Positive School Psychology, vol. 6, no. 6

Pages: 5936-5947

Asia, Australasia, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Indonesia, Montessori method of education, Southeast Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Character education is an effort to form good values imprinted in a person and manifested in the form of behavior so they can distinguish themselves from others. This character education aims to form a strong and noble human being. All educational institutions realize how important the development of character education is for students in their institutions. However, the process of character education has not been fully able to run effectively in all educational institutions because schools emphasize more on increasing students' cognitive abilities. This study aimed to obtain an overview of the extent to which teachers understand the importance of character education in Early Childhood Education (ECE) and the Montessori Method in shaping the character of students. This study is quantitative with a descriptive approach. The sample in this study was ECE teachers in Panongan Sub-district, Tangerang Regency, totaling 112 people. The selection of samples was done using the Simple Random Sampling method. The instrument used was a survey distributed to respondents via Google form. The results of the study indicate that ECE teachers have understood the importance of character education and the Montessori Method which is integrated into 6 aspects of early childhood development through a character education process that is provided continuously at every level.

Language: English

ISSN: 2717-7564

Bachelor's Thesis

Mediakasvatus montessoripedagogisessa varhaiskasvatuksessa / Media education in Montessori pedagogical early childhood education

Available from: Theseus (Finland)

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Abstract/Notes: The aim of the thesis was to map what media education is like in Montessori-pedagogical early childhood education. The purpose was to examine how Montessori pedagogy developed more than a hundred years ago meets children's digitized growth environment and media culture. The research was qualitative. The theoretical basis of the work was research on children's media use and media education, the national foundations of the early childhood education plan and the principles of Montessori pedagogy. The data collection method was a semi-structured thematic interview. The interviewees were six early childhood education teachers who worked in Montessori kindergartens for 3-6 year olds in the capital region. The transcribed material was analyzed using theory-driven content analysis. In the research questions, I clarified the Montessori educators' views on media education and its challenges, as well as the special features of Montessori pedagogical media education. In addition, it was mapped how different media content and information and communication technology were utilized in the pedagogical practices of Montessori kindergartens. The key result was that the Montessori educators had a positive attitude towards media education and were more aware than before, but there was also a need for development. The goals of teaching media literacy and information and communication technology skills were seen to be the child's inclusion, supporting agency and equality. Media education aimed to strengthen children's active media skills, i.e. children's own production and expression. A critical attitude towards media devices and content was also considered important. Learning in Montessori pedagogy is based on the concreteness and sensibility of Montessori tools, which is still seen as a working method. Therefore, supplementing the prepared learning environment with technology should be done pedagogically. On the other hand, the child-oriented nature of Montessori pedagogy, the learning of phenomena, and the effort to help the child function in their own everyday life create a good starting point for reforming Montessori pedagogy as needed with media education tools, applications, and content. Awareness of media education and supporting technical skills are ways, which strengthen the position of media education in Montessori pedagogical early childhood education.

Language: Finnish

Published: Helsinki, Finland, 2019

Article

Development of a Peace Education Program by the Kindergarten Teacher Awareness for Peace Education in Korea

Available from: The Korean Society for Early Childhood Education

Publication: International Journal of Early Childhood Education, vol. 9, no. 2

Pages: 39-69

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Abstract/Notes: This study examines the baseline data of peace educational ideas in the level of recognition and practice among Korean kindergarten teachers. Data was collected through a questionnaire survey. Subjects served for this study consisted of 265 kindergarten teachers including 93 Montessori teachers and 172 traditional kindergarten teachers among 42 kindergartens located in Seoul and Kyungki province area, a using random sampling method. Data was analyzed by IBM-PC computer, using a SPSS program. Statistical methods employed were frequency: of item, t-test, and ANOVA. The authors developed a peace education activity, and applying the kindergarten based on the data obtained from this study and Montes-sort four domains for a peace education to be reviewed. The results of this study were as follows: There was no significant difference in the awareness of peace education between Montessori teachers and traditional kindergarten teachers. The teachers who had much more teaching experiences showed the higher awareness for peace educational practice than younger teachers with the shorter teaching career. Even though Montessori and traditional kindergarten teachers had the high recognition for a peace education did not have the systemically peace education program. Authors developed 12 activities of peace education included self-awareness (3 activities), community awareness (3 activities), cultural awareness (3 activities), and global environmental awareness (3 activities). The peace educational program on the basis of research data and the Montessori had four domains. The standards of a peace educational program are decided and accomplished on the basis of these four categorical interactions and all practical data available for the real state of affairs in a specific cultural community and country. In conclusion, standards of peace education are subject to change as the actual circumstances of country and the world change and teacher practice patterns for the peace education evolve. These parameters of peace education should be considered in peace education programs only.

Language: English

ISSN: 1226-9557, 2733-9653

Article

Life Education [Drug education program]

Publication: Montessori Today (London), vol. 1, no. 5

Pages: 12-13

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Language: English

ISSN: 0952-8652

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The New Curriculum of Education in Kenya: a Linguistic and Education Paradigm Shift

Available from: eRepository at University of Nairobi, Kenya

Publication: International Journal of Novel Research in Education and Learning, vol. 5, no. 1

Pages: 15-27

Africa, East Africa, Kenya, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Abstract/Notes: The current system of education in Kenya is the 8-4-4 structure, where children study for eight years of Basic (primary) education, four years of Secondary education and four years of University education. This system was introduced in 1985 to promote man-power capable of performing blue collar jobs, as compared to the former 7-6-3 system that targeted developing a local workforce to replace the British workforce who largely held white collar jobs in the new, independent Kenya. However, over the years, the 8-4-4 curriculum has been widely criticised for a myriad of reasons. The criticisms against this curriculum are that it is too heavily loaded with content, purely examinations-oriented, and generally violating the Rights of the Child by placing undue physical and psychological pressure on learners. In order to address this problem therefore, a new curriculum was hastily crafted and taken through a rushed pilot drive in April 2017 and is expected to replace the current 8-4-4 system by January 2018. Admittedly, this new education system addresses some of the weaknesses of the current 8-4-4 education system, since it is competency-based and focuses more on skills acquisition as opposed to a purely knowledge-based acquisition system. The issues addressed in this paper is how this new and hurriedly crafted curriculum (as well as the introduction of Free Secondary School Education) will be implemented by teachers who are yet to come to terms with the new paradigm shift of teaching and learning. The second issue addressed is whether the crafters of this system took into consideration children’s rights, or whether at all, the system was crafted from a child-centred perspective. The concerns are that apart from the manner in which this syllabus was been crafted and planned for implementation, if not reviewed comprehensively may not only violate the rights of future generations of children, but also enhance negative ethnicity from a linguistic perspective

Language: English

ISSN: 2394-9686

Book

Report on the Montessori System of Education: Presented to the Council of Education, Witwatersrand

Africa, L. C. Wynsouw - Writings, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Language: English

Published: Johannesburg, South Africa: Council of Education, 1915

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Inclusive Education for Exceptional Children in Egypt and the US: Reforming Egyptian Inclusive Education System in Post-pandemic World

Available from: Knowledge E Publishing

Publication: Gulf Education and Social Policy Review (GESPR), vol. 3, no. 2

Pages: 318-344

Africa, Americas, Educational change, Egypt, Inclusive education, Middle East, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North Africa, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Inclusive education means that exceptional children (EC) can fully participate in the learning process alongside their typically developing peers, supported by reasonable accommodations and teaching strategies that are tailored to meet their individual needs. The main goal of inclusion policies for EC is to provide high-quality education for all without discrimination and to ensure the implementation of equal opportunity principles. The primary purpose of this study is to explore the reality of inclusive education systems in Egypt and the United States (US) and to develop a better understanding of similarities and differences and thus identify the lessons learned. The study applied a comparative analysis method. Research findings revealed that the progress towards inclusion practices in Egyptian inclusive public schools is minimal and hindered by many challenges. Among them are lacking financial resources and a shortage of qualified teachers trained to differentiate curricula for EC. Based on the research findings, the study concludes with recommendations to improve the Egyptian inclusive education for EC.

Language: English

DOI: 10.18502/gespr.v3i2.12617

ISSN: 2709-0191

Report

Comparing Montessori Education and Conventional Education on Aspects of Creativity

Available from: Syracuse University

Comparative education, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: My Honors Thesis compares creativity in children taught in a Montessori classroom with students taught in a conventional classroom. I tested 58 children at Belle Valley Elementary School in Erie Pennsylvania, half in the Montessori program, half in traditional classrooms. Their ages ranged from 5-9, from kindergarten to 3rd grade. I hypothesized that the independence allowed in Montessori classrooms would help foster creativity in its students. The project uses two forms of evaluation to test the concept of creativity, the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking and consensual assessment to score a creative collage. Significant developmental differences were found; older children scored higher on the creativity tests. There was, however, no significant difference between Montessori and conventionally taught children. The conclusion is that in young children creativity develops over time, but that the type of schooling does not moderate this development.

Language: English

Published: Syracuse, New York, 2005

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