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Article

Field Notes

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 8, no. 1

Pages: 30

Public Montessori

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Abstract/Notes: Preschools in Georgia, Denver, Colorado; Schools in Hartford, Connecticut, Savannah, Georgia, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Romania, South Africa; Training in Scotch Plains, NJ, offers college credits

Language: English

Article

John McDermott and the Road to Montessori Public Schools

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 26, no. 3

Pages: 46-49

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: In this article, the author states that, for over 45 years, she has explored the issues of leadership and change, and, along the way, she has examined how diversity fits in with these ideas. She states that she found all three of these concepts embodied in the person of John McDermott, a leader in the American Montessori movement in the United States. McDermott helped establish the framework for putting Montessori education into an American cultural context. His message was always the need for public education, the necessity of embracing African-Americans and the poor in Montessori schools, and the damage to cities caused by white flight. McDermott held to his view that the quality of public education was key to the future of the republic. He decried the economic and social disparity between poor urban and inner-city schools and those of the affluent middle class, along with the ever-widening gap between the poor and the affluent and between blacks, Latinos, and whites. McDermott continued to stress the need to make Montessori education relevant to present problems, although he did not view Montessori education as a single solution to the problems in American education. He challenged the American Montessori Society to examine the ways in which growth and change occur in America.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Students Work for the Greater Good

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 28, no. 3

Pages: 17

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: While I was accustomed to seeing students take on projects to collect funds (or canned food, shoes, blankets, etc.) for people in need, Middle School students at Valley Montessori School (Livermore, CA) took things further a few years ago.(Both purchases helped to protect and preserve threatened and endangered habitats.) Classes have also raised funds for the grassroots campaign Nothing but Nets, which provides much-needed bed nets to keep out mosquitoes and help prevent malaria in Africa.After learning that AMS 2016 Living Legacy Carolyn Kambich spoke about building Montessori schools and teacher training centers in Uganda at the AMS 2016 Annual Conference, Valley Middle School students determined that they should host a breakfast and boutique event, in which they would make and sell breakfast foods and craft items, to educate others about and raise money for this endeavor.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

2017 AMS Grants and Awards

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 29, no. 2

Pages: 26-27

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Over a career spanning more than five decades, Virginia (Ginny) Hennes has served the Montessori community in numerous roles: parent, volunteer, lead teacher, teacher education program director, teacher education instructor, founder of three Montessori schools, field consultant, chair of the AMS Review Committee, member of a MACTE on-site review committee, and MACTE commissioner.Barbara Nelson, $500 The Montessori House Elementary School, in Richmond, TX, will use their grant to aid in the construction of a student-maintained natural playscape, peace garden, and conflict-resolution area.Katie Brown, "Evaluating the Effectiveness ofMontessori Reading and Math Instruction for Third Grade African American Students in Urban Elementary Schools" Anthony Setari, "Construction and Validation of a Holistic Education School Evaluation Tool Using Montessori Erdkinder Principles" Master's Thesis Two theses tied for first place; $500 will go to each winner:

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Montessori Milestones

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 7, no. 4

Pages: 16

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Abstract/Notes: U.N. report; Archives committee; Montessori Teacher Education Collaborative consults in South Africa

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

The Revelation of the Universal Child

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 40, no. 2

Pages: 1-13

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Abstract/Notes: Lynne Lawrence puts forward the solemn belief that each child is fulfilling the destiny of every human being. As children make their own contributions to their unique family, society, and global life, they are putting the common good above their own needs. Lawrence begins her case for universality with a moving statement from an African teacher in a Montessori training course. She then goes on to observe the human tendencies and constructive energies that every child carries across the planes of development. Lawrence's solid global framework stands as the preface for this journal. [This chapter is adapted from the talk that was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Fostering Montessori Preparedness for Global Citizenship" in Seattle, WA, November 13-16, 2014.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Societal Values and Policies May Curtail Preschool Children’s Physical Activity in Child Care Centers

Available from: American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)

Publication: Pediatrics, vol. 129, no. 2

Pages: 265-274

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Abstract/Notes: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Three-fourths of US preschool-age children are in child care centers. Children are primarily sedentary in these settings, and are not meeting recommended levels of physical activity. Our objective was to identify potential barriers to children’s physical activity in child care centers. METHODS: Nine focus groups with 49 child care providers (55% African American) were assembled from 34 centers (inner-city, suburban, Head Start, and Montessori) in Cincinnati, Ohio. Three coders independently analyzed verbatim transcripts for themes. Data analysis and interpretation of findings were verified through triangulation of methods. RESULTS: We identified 3 main barriers to children’s physical activity in child care: (1) injury concerns, (2) financial, and (3) a focus on “academics.” Stricter licensing codes intended to reduce children's injuries on playgrounds rendered playgrounds less physically challenging and interesting. In addition, some parents concerned about potential injury, requested staff to restrict playground participation for their children. Small operating margins of most child care centers limited their ability to install abundant playground equipment. Child care providers felt pressure from state mandates and parents to focus on academics at the expense of gross motor play. Because children spend long hours in care and many lack a safe place to play near their home, these barriers may limit children's only opportunity to engage in physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: Societal priorities for young children—safety and school readiness—may be hindering children’s physical development. In designing environments that optimally promote children’s health and development, child advocates should think holistically about potential unintended consequences of policies.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1542/peds.2011-2102

ISSN: 0031-4005, 1098-4275

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