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Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Longitudinal Comparison of Montessori versus Non-Montessori Students’ Place-Value and Arithmetic Knowledge

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 2, no. 1

Pages: 1-15

Americas, Comparative education, Mathematics education, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Base-10 and place value understanding are important foundational math concepts that are associated with higher use of decomposition strategies and higher accuracy on addition problems (Laski, Ermakova, & Vasilyeva, 2014; Fuson, 1990; Fuson & Briars, 1990; National Research Council, 2001). The current study examined base-10 knowledge, place value, and arithmetic accuracy and strategy use for children in early elementary school from Montessori and non-Montessori schools. Children (N = 150) were initially tested in either kindergarten or first grade. We followed up with a subgroup of the sample (N = 53) two years later when the children were in 2nd and 3rd grade. Although Montessori curriculum puts a large emphasis on the base-10 structure of number, we found that children from Montessori schools only showed an advantage on correct use of base-10 canonical representation in kindergarten but not in first grade. Moreover, there were no program differences in place value understanding in 2nd and 3rd grade. Although Montessori children used different strategies to obtain answers to addition problems in 2nd and 3rd grade as compared with non-Montessori children, there were no program differences in addition accuracy at any grade level. Educational implications are discussed.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v2i1.5677

ISSN: 2378-3923

Thesis

Projeto pedagógico de Maria Montessori

Americas, Brazil, Latin America and the Caribbean, Montessori method of education, South America

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Abstract/Notes: Este trabalho pretende contribuir para o debate sobre a fundamentacao teorico-metodologica da pratica docente na medida em que procura refletir sobre um dos metodos mais difundidos e controvertidos do seculo xx: montessori. A pesquisa busca explicitar a relacao existente entre o projeto educacional e o projeto social de maria montessori. Parte-se, do pressuposto de que aquilo que e privilegiado no processo escolar por uma dada teoria, esta vinculado a forma como sao apreendidas as questoes fundamentais encontradas na pratica social. A comparacao da teoria montessoriana com as de outros educadores pertencentes a epocas diferentes e utilizada para possibilitar tal reflexao. Onde se encontram as origens do metodo, quais sao para montessori as questoes essenciais e que encaminhamentos apresenta para resolve-las, sao o cerne do universo desse trabalho. [This work intends to contribute to the debate on the theoretical-methodological foundation of teaching practice as it seeks to reflect on one of the most widespread and controversial methods of the twentieth century: montessori. The research seeks to clarify the relationship between the educational project and the social project of Maria Montessori. It starts with the assumption that what is privileged in the school process by a given theory is linked to the way in which the fundamental issues found in social practice are apprehended. The comparison of Montessori theory with those of other educators from different times is used to enable such reflection. Where are the origins of the method, what are the essential questions for Montessori and what steps it presents to resolve them, are the core of the universe of this work.]

Language: Portuguese

Published: São Paulo, Brazil, 1994

Book Section

Adelia Pyle: From Montessori Disciple to Padre Pio Disciple

Available from: Springer Link

Book Title: America's Early Montessorians: Anne George, Margaret Naumburg, Helen Parkhurst and Adelia Pyle

Pages: 185-216

Adelia Pyle - Biographic sources, Americas, Montessori method of education - History, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Unlike George, Parkhurst, and Naumburg, Adelia Pyle’s role in the early history of the Montessori movement came from discipleship rather than education. Trained as a directress in 1913, Pyle, the daughter of a wealthy New York family, became Montessori’s faithful aide and translator. From 1915 to 1919, the Pyle family was the principal financial contributor to the Montessori Promotion Fund founded by Maria Montessori. The fund purchased the American House of Childhood which manufactured and sold Montessori’s didactic materials. However, the Pyle family’s withdrawal of financial support, due to a conflict between Adelia’s mother, Adelaide McAlpin Pyle and Maria Montessori, had a devastating effect on the expansion of the Montessori Method in the United States. While living and traveling with Montessori, a Roman Catholic, Adelia, a Presbyterian, converted to Catholicism. In 1923, she met the famous Padre Pio, a charismatic Roman Catholic priest in Italy, who was acclaimed as bearing the stigmata, the wounds of the crucified Christ. Adelia Pyle, who seemed to seek the role of disciple, had found a new master. She transferred her allegiance from Montessori to Pio and was his disciple for forty-five years. She died on April 26, 1968 in San Giovanni Rotondo. There has been a movement to have her canonized as a saint of the Catholic Church.

Language: English

Published: Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020

ISBN: 978-3-030-54835-3

Series: Historical Studies in Education

Report

The Bronx New School: Weaving Assessment into the Fabric of Teaching and Learning. A Series on Authentic Assessment and Accountability

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: In 1987, parents and teachers from diverse neighborhoods of a local school district in New York (New York) founded the Bronx New School, a small public elementary school of choice that was meant to be learner-centered, with high standards for all. The school was organized into heterogeneous, multi-age classes and structured to encourage collaboration among faculty, students, and families. In spite of political stresses, the school's founding values have survived. This report focuses on the first 3 years of its life, a time when a comprehensive assessment system was designed and used throughout the school. The assessment system was designed to support instruction and learning through the collection of descriptive records of student growth. Teacher-kept records, student-kept records, and samples of student work in portfolios are used in combination to develop a picture of student learning. A developmental framework constructed by teachers provides a general guide for expectations of

Language: English

Published: New York, New York, Sep 1994

Article

Strategies to Support Concentration

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 42, no. 2

Pages: 45-60

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Annette Haines provides a comprehensive overview of concentration across the planes. She first lays the foundation for thinking about student engagement: It must be understood that concentration is found through the interest of the child, which is guided by the sensitive periods. When we understand the child's development in this way, we can offer the most likely "hooks" to catch the child's interest and create engagement. Haines offers examples of hooks at each plane. Along the way she weaves in the science of the brain to further enhance understanding of the development of the young child and to reinforce the "why" behind behavior. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled Finding the Hook: Montessori Strategies to Support Concentration, October 6-9, 2016, in Columbia, MD.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Doctoral Dissertation

An Intergrated Learning Programme for the Knysna Montessori School

Available from: SEALS (South East Academic Libraries System)

Africa, Knysna Montessori School (Knysna, South Africa), Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Abstract/Notes: In line with Montessori methodology, the Knysna Montessori School runs its programmes in an integrated and holistic manner. Learning programmes are based on a blend of various Montessori learning programmes and the Revised National Curriculum Statement (RNCS). Classes are divided into three year-age groupings; and integrated learning programmes are in place within the pre-school, (including grade R), the grade 1 to 3 class, and the grade 4 to 6 class. However, the grade 7 to 9 Montessori class has been running in a more traditional and less integrated manner since its inception in 2004. That has motivated the undertaking of this study. The main aim of this qualitative study has been to determine how to best arrange the RNCS according to Montessori principles, that is to say, in a holistic and integrated manner, with the intention of presenting a learning programme for the grade 7 to 9 class. This aim was based on a constructivist philosophical foundation and addressed in conjunction with interpretivism and critical theory. The grounded theory research paradigm was followed. In this paradigm research findings are grounded in the data gathering and the analysis. Three methods of data collection were applied, namely a literature review, interviews and document analysis. A literature review was conducted to gain a better overview and understanding of the RNCS and Outcomes-Based Education (OBE). Furthermore, through the literature review, an in-depth understanding of the Montessori method of education, adolescent development and integrated and holistic education have been achieved. Interviews were conducted with staff from the Knysna Montessori School, with the purpose of gathering information on the Knysna Montessori School and its current application to the RNCS, from pre-school to grade 6. An availability and purposive sampling method was applied, in order to determine which staff members to interview. Finally, document analysis was done. The learning areas for the senior phase (grades 7 to 9) of the General Education and Training Band (GET) of the RNCS were coded and analysed in order to discover emergent themes within the RNCS and how these link with the Montessori curriculum arrangement for this age group. It became apparent that Montessori classrooms, both prior to and for the senior phase, are divided into three areas, namely language, mathematics and cultural studies. Based on this knowledge, as well as the documentary analysis, an integrated learning programme, grounded in the data analysis, was designed. It was found that the RNCS matches well with Montessori’s curriculum arrangement. Thus, this learning programme is in line with Montessori’s curriculum arrangement for the senior phase of the GET band. Such a curriculum arrangement integrates the learning outcomes and assessment standards from arts and culture, economic and management sciences, life orientation, natural sciences, social sciences and technology into different studies. These are globally referred to as cultural studies. However, specific attention was also given to moral education, self-expression through music, art and drama, entrepreneurship, career education and sport. The conclusion was reached that an integrated learning programme, based on Montessori principles and in line with the RNCS requirement, is possible for the Knysna Montessori School.

Language: English

Published: Port Elizabeth, South Africa, 2010

Article

シュタイナー教育とモンテッソーリ教育に基づく発達障がい児教育モデルの構築 : 両教育の接点とシュタイナー療育の事例 [Development of an Educational Model for Children with Developmental Disabilities Based on Steiner and Montessori Education Systems and the Case of Steiner’s Therapeutic Education]

Available from: Hiroshima University Institutional Repository

Publication: Rinrigaku kenkyū / 倫理学研究 / Journal of Ethical Studies, no. 26

Pages: 1-14

Children with disabilities, Developmentally disabled children, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Waldorf method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Abstract/Notes: The primary purpose of this paper is to clarify the relationship between Montessori educational thought and the influence of theosophy in Montessori’s work before, during (1939–1946), and after the period she stayed in India. The image of the Montessori method is corrected by consideration and various concepts of the Montessori method compared with theosophy are presented as a new perspective. A peculiar vertical paradigm related to theosophy as a “relationship that I conform to the universe” and a “transformation of the subject for the rise of the spirit” is shown as an effective index for understanding Montessori educational thought. Through a profound perspective based on concepts such as holism, various concepts of the Montessori method, such as “social reformation,” “order,” “concentration,” “work,” and the “sensitive periods” are reviewed as a “prelude to religious awakening.” This vertical paradigm can also be found in Steiner educational thought. The second purpose of this paper is to introduce the practice of both therapeutic education systems based on this vertical paradigm.

Language: Japanese

DOI: 10.15027/50881

ISSN: 0916-247X

Article

What Is Montessori Education?

Publication: Montessori Articles (Montessori Australia Foundation)

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Language: English

Article

How Do Children Transition from Montessori to Traditional School?

Publication: Montessori Articles (Montessori Australia Foundation)

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Language: English

Article

An Unlikely Montessori Classroom

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 44, no. 1

Pages: 63-67

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Abstract/Notes: One parent found inspiration and grounding in Dr. Montessori’s teachings as she and her family spent three years on the water. The daily demands of manning a sailboat and navigating around the ocean provided real, meaningful work for this family’s two children, serving as an unusual classroom rich in activities of the hand and the head. Catherine DeNardo reflects on how with Montessori’s guidance and an open mind, unusual “classrooms” can be found almost anywhere.

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

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