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Article

Classroom Resources [plays for reading; flip reference guides; science sourcebook]

Publication: AMI Elementary Alumni Association Newsletter, vol. 26, no. 2

Pages: 9

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Language: English

Article

Montessori and Resources for Infant Educarers (RIE) Part 2: Similarities

Publication: Infants and Toddlers, vol. 4, no. 3

Pages: 11–16

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Language: English

Article

Both Teach Little Ones; Chinese and Italian Shake Hands at Reception; Madame Montessori Guest of Honor at Pasadena

Available from: ProQuest Historical Newspapers

Publication: Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, California)

Pages: II-8

Americas, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: "Pasadena, May 7 - Madame Maria Montessori of Italy and Sz-To-Wal of Canton, China, two noted educators and founders of methods for teaching the young, met last night at the reception given the charming Italian at the Hotel Maryland by the Pasadena Board of Trade and seventeen other organizations. Dr. Sz-To-Wal has been in California just one week, and came over from Los Angeles last night to meet and talk to the woman who is devoting her life to the kind of endeavor which he has chosen as his life's work. The man from China is teaching 180 children in the Canton Christian College by his method. He endeavors to emphasize in his pupils self-activity and individuality, which is also included in the Montessori system. He has come to America to learn the methods employed in teaching the young already in vogue here. "Education in China," he declared "is still young, and we will be most happy if we can learn the American system." The reception, from many viewpoints, was the most remarkable ever given in the Crown City. Dr. Montessori gave an address, and as she speaks no English, was assisted by Father Tonelli of Los Angeles as interpreter. At the conclusion of her address everybody was presented and there were many who begged for enlightenment from the half-dozen familiar with Italian so that they might say "howdy-do" in her native tongue. Preceding the reception Madame Montessori was guest of honor at a dinner at which covers were laid for Dr. Jeremiah Rhodes, Dr. J. H. McBride, Dr. George Abbott, Mrs. A. F. Gartz, Miss Virginia Pease, Miss Mildred Johnson, Mrs. Johnson, President James A. B. Scherer of Throop, Mr. and Mrs. W. S. McCay and Father Tonelli, who sat at Madame Montessori's right."

Language: English

Article

Houston’s Strongest Little Magnet

Available from: HathiTrust

Publication: American Education, vol. 17, no. 9

Pages: 19-22

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Language: English

ISSN: 0002-8304

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Helen Parkhurst: The First Female Reformer in the Field of Organization of Education

Available from: PNO Journal

Publication: Perspektivy Nauki i Obrazovaniya / Перспективы Науки и Образования [Perspectives of Science and Education], vol. 2, no. 56

Pages: 523-533

Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Helen Parkhurst - Biographic sources

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Abstract/Notes: Проблема повышения уровня преподавания в сфере общего и профессионального образования является одной из наиболее значимых в современной педагогике. В связи с этим современные дидакты внимательно изучают наследие своих выдающихся предшественников, – педагогов прошлого. К числу таких ученых, оставивших неповторимый след в педагогической науке и практике, относится американская учительница Хелен Паркхерст (1886-1973). Статья написана в связи с 135-летием со дня рождения Х. Паркхерст.Американская учительница-новатор Хелен Паркхерст, наряду с Марией Монтессори, нарушила монополию мужчин на право считаться крупным ученым в области педагогики. Ее педагогическая деятельность включала в себя стремление к постоянному профессиональному самосовершенствованию, поиску новых путей в решении встававших перед ней педагогических проблем. Ее главным методическим достижением стала разработка Дальтон-плана, в соответствии с которым она успешно перестроила работу в одной из американских школ. Методическая новация Паркхерст получила одобрение со стороны вначале педагогов США, а затем повсюду в мире. В СССР в 1920-1930-х гг. этот метод также активно использовался, правда, без особого успеха. Применение Дальтон-плана в советской школе нашло отражение в ряде произведений художественной литературы (М. Г. Розанов, Н. И. Кочин). Методические идеи Хелен Паркхерст в наши дни крайне востребованы и активно используются в современной образовательной практике многих стран мира, в том числе в России. В то же время их позитивный потенциал еще не вполне изучен и освоен, поэтому наследие Х. Паркхерст заслуживает дальнейшего внимательного исследования дидактами и историками педагогики. / The problem of raising the level of teaching in the field of general and vocational education is one of the most significant in modern pedagogy. In this regard, modern didactic students are carefully studying the legacy of their outstanding predecessors, teachers of the past. The American teacher Helen Parkhurst (1886-1973) is one of these scientists who left an inimitable mark on pedagogical science and practice. The article was written in connection with the 135th anniversary of the birth of H. Parkhurst. The American teacher-innovator Helen Parkhurst, along with Maria Montessori, violated the monopoly of men on the right to be considered a major scientist in the field of pedagogy. Her pedagogical activity included the desire for constant professional self-improvement, the search for new ways in solving the pedagogical problems that confronted her. Her main methodological achievement was the development of the Dalton Plan, according to which she successfully restructured work in one of the American schools. The methodical innovation of Parkhurst was approved first by educators in the United States, and then all over the world. In the USSR in the 1920-1930s. this method was also actively used, however, without much success. The use of the Dalton plan in the Soviet school was reflected in a number of works of fiction (M. G. Rozanov, N. I. Kochin). The methodological ideas of Helen Parkhurst are extremely in demand these days and are actively used in modern educational practice in many countries of the world, including Russia. At the same time, their positive potential has not yet been fully explored and mastered, so the legacy of Helen Parkhurst deserves further careful study by didactics and historians of pedagogy.

Language: Russian

DOI: 10.32744/pse.2022.2.31

ISSN: 2307-2334

Archival Material Or Collection

Box 9, Folder 15 - Manuscripts, ca. 1921-ca.1966 - "The Montessori Movement in Many Lands" unidentified letter [title pg: The Montessori Teacher by Helene Helming. Aachen, Germany]

Available from: Seattle University

Edwin Mortimer Standing - Biographic sources, Edwin Mortimer Standing - Writings, Montessori method of education - History, Montessori movement

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Language: English

Archive: Seattle University, Lemieux Library and McGoldrick Learning Commons, Special Collections

Doctoral Dissertation

The Growth of the Montessori Movement in the United States, 1909-1970

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Americas, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to examine the growth of the Montessori Movement in the United States during the periods 1909-1921 and 1952-1970. The Montessori system was viewed as an innovation in American education and special attention was directed to the leaders of the movement and the role they played in its growth. The primary sources used for the initial period were the papers of Mabel Bell kept in the Bell Room of the National Geographic Society and the McClure Manuscripts housed in the Lilly Library at Indiana University. For the latter period, the following sources were utilized: American Montessori Society files, files of Whitby School, tape recordings from the American Montessori Society, interviews with Nancy Rambusch, Cleo Monson, John McDermott and correspondence with Mario Montessori and Margaret Stephensen. In addition to visits to the original Casa dei Bambini in Rome and modern Case in Italy, many Montessori schools in the United States were observed. The background of Dr. Montessori was discussed and the influences, principles and contributions of her method were examined. The period from 1909-1921 was analyzed with reference to the leadership of Maria Montessori, S.S. McClure, Mabel Bell, Helen Parkhurst and William Kilpatrick. The social, educational, political, theoretical and communications problems were examined to determine possible reasons for the demise of Montessori education in that era. The renascance [sic] of Montessori education in the United States (1952-1970) was examined with emphasis on the leadership of Mario Montessori, Nancy Rambusch, Margaret Stephenson, Cleo Monson and John McDermott. The areas of social, educational, theoretical and communications were studied for likely reasons for the resurgence of Montessori education in America. A paradigmatic schema was used to compare the role of the leaders in each period: Policy maker- Maria Montessori and Mario Montessori; Promoter- S.S. McClure and Nancy Rambusch; Organizer- Mabel Bell and Cleo Monson; Disciple- Helen Parkhurst and Margaret Stephenson; Professional Educator- William Kilpatrick and John McDermott. The qualities of leadership which led to the original demise of the Montessori Movement were: 1) Mistrust and lack of direct contact with United States educators and Montessori promoters by Maria Montessori; 2) Withdrawal of lecture and film rights from S.S. McClure by Dr. Montessori; 3) Dissolution of Montessori organizations by Mabel Bell and Helen Parkhurst because of lack of confidence in them by Maria Montessori; 5) Strong influence by William Kilpatrick (who did not believe in the Montessori method) on kindergarten teachers. The rebirth of the Montessori Movement was influenced by: 1) Mario Montessori's strong adherence to the original ideas of Maria Montessori; 2) Nancy Rambusch's proper use of leadership and timing and the formation of the American Montessori Society by her; 3) The organized efforts of the American Montessori Society and its teacher-training and public relations function by Cleo Monson; 4) The loyalty and knowledge displayed by Margaret Stephenson in running the Association Montessori Internationale teacher-training course in Washington; 5) the efforts of John McDermott to put Montessori in an American cultural context in teacher-training and professionalization of Montessori education. The writer finds strong indications for the thesis that it was the leadership which effected the growth of the Montessori Movement in the United States and recommends further research into other educational innovations in the United States such as the British Infant School Movement and Headstart with attention to the leadership.

Language: English

Published: New York, 1971

Article

Dr. Montessori Aims to Aid Poor: Italian Educator Says Their Children Are More Eager to Learn

Available from: Chronicling America (Library of Congress)

Publication: New York Tribune (New York, New York)

Pages: 6

Americas, Margaret Naumburg - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: "Yesterday the Dottoressa Maria Montessori held the first conference with her pupils in America. It was at the Children's House, 520 East Seventy-seventh Street. The Children's House is one of the thirty Montessori schools which have sprung up in New York during the last three years. The conference was impressive. The great Italian teacher greeted her pupils, her disciples , if you like, with delight and apparent amazement at the development of her work in New York. "This beautiful house of the children!" She cried. "You have so much here; in Italy we cannot give the children all this, we have it not to give, but little is much when children are free." Her work is growing fast in Italy. In the districts which have been devastated by the earthquakes twelve schools have been established. "I have now developed a method of educating children from five to ten years old. By it they learn reading, writing, arithmetic very easily - but especially nature, science, the languages. Then they are ready to enter the high schools, I believe you call it. Two years are saved in the school life of every child. My elementary methods have been put into sixteen schools in Italy. Signorini Maccheroni is training teachers and opening our schools in Spain." Miss Anne E. George, who introduced Dr. Montessori's work into this community, asked how Montessori teachers in the United States could learn the methods for older pupils. "Signorina Fidele might come here and supervise the elementary classes which you form." "But you, Dottoressa," exclaimed Margaret Naumberg, "why won't you stay and help us?" Dr. Montessori didn't say she would, but I noticed particularly that she didn't say she wouldn't. She is now on her way to California, where she will give a four months' course in Montessori methods in Los Angeles and San Diego. Her latest book, describing her work with older children, will be published in the fall. "Now, that is all my news, and I want to hear what you are doing. I want always to keep in close touch with you and with your work. Tell me what you are doing." Mrs. A. Reno Margulies, of 534 West 187th Street, told of her work with deaf and backward children. Miss George spoke of hers. "Ah," said Dr. Montessori, "but are you not working with the children of the well-to-do? Tell me what you are doing for the children of the poor." Miss Zoé Bateman, secretary of the Montessori Association, explained that the Children's House in which the conference was held was a free school, supported by contributions. "It is very hard to get the work taken up by the public schools," said Margaret Naumberg. "We have just secured permission to establish a class in Public School 4. It was only possible because of the enthusiasm of the principal, Simon Hirsdansky, for Dr. Montessori's work. "Until the work is developed by the Board of Education it cannot be carried very far among the poor, for teachers must live as well as teach." "It is easier to teach the children of the poor," said Dr. Montessori. "They are more eager to learn." "Oh, no" cried her pupils in chorus, "The children who have better homes, better food and better care learn much faster than the poorer children." "I had a group of poor children last winter, and a group of well-to-do children this winter," said Margaret Naumberg, "and the latter learned in six weeks more than the former learned in a year.""

Language: English

ISSN: 1941-0646

Article

Plan to Take Course: San Francisco Teachers Will Enroll for Montessori Study

Available from: Newspapers.com

Publication: Stevens Point Journal (Stevens Point, Wisconsin)

Pages: 1

Americas, Helen Parkhurst - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, North America, United States of America

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Language: English

Article

A Montessori Club: First Organization of Kind in State Formed Here

Available from: Newspapers.com

Publication: Stevens Point Journal (Stevens Point, Wisconsin)

Pages: 1

Americas, Helen Parkhurst - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, North America, United States of America

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Language: English

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