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Article

Dr. Montessori in India

Available from: ProQuest Historical Newspapers

Publication: Times of India (Mumbai, India)

Pages: 8

Asia, India, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: "Madras, November 5. Dr. Maria Montessori, the famous authority on child education and the founder of the Montessori system of education, arrived at the Meenambakkam aerodrome yesterday. She is staying at the Theosophical Society, Adyar. She will inaugurate the Montessori training course on November 11 at Adyar

Language: English

Article

María Montessori y la Educación Cósmica [Maria Montessori and Cosmic Education]

Available from: Universidad de Costa Rica - Portal de Revistas Académicas

Publication: REHMLAC (Revista de Estudios Históricos de la Masonería Latinoamericana y Caribeña), vol. 7, no. 2

Pages: 290-326

Asia, Cosmic education, India, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, South Asia, Theosophical Society, Theosophy

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Abstract/Notes: La etapa de Montessori en la India fue uno de los periodos más enriquecedores en la vida de Maria Montessori. Allí escribió y publicó La Mente Absorbente del niño, y una serie de libros fundamentales. En su obra La educación de las potencialidades humanas desarrolló los principios de la “Educación Cósmica” que adaptó para el currículo de Primaria. Invitada en 1939 a dar unas conferencias en la India por el Presidente de la Sociedad Teosófica, Montessori y su hijo, se vieron atrapados por el estallido de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, y su posterior desarrollo. Tenía 69 años cuando llegó a Madrás. Permaneció diez años. Pero nada sería igual que antes. Había una Montessori antes de la India, y otra mucho más profunda después. Cuando regresaba a Europa declaró, a los que le preguntaban qué había hecho en la India: “creo que he aprendido a aprender, como el Niño”. [The decade Maria Montessori spent in India was one of the most enriching periods of her life. During that phase, she wrote and published The Absorbent Mind of the Child, as well as a number of fundamental books in her career. In The Education of Human Potentialities, she developed the principles of the “Cosmic Education”, a curriculum which she adapted for elementary students. Invited in 1939 to give lectures by the president of the Theosophical Society, Maria Montessori and her son were trapped by the outbreak of World War II and its subsequent development. She was 69 when she arrived to Madras. She stayed ten years. There was a Maria Montessori before India, and a much deeper one later. When she returned to Europe, when asked what she had done in India, she declared, “I think I’ve learned how to learn, as if I were a Child”.]

Language: Spanish

DOI: 10.15517/rehmlac.v7i2.22697

ISSN: 1659-4223

Article

New Zealand Theosophists in “New Education” networks, 1880s-1938

Available from: Emerald Insight

Publication: History of Education Review, vol. 46, no. 1

Pages: 42-57

Asia, Australasia, Australia and New Zealand, India, Montessori method of education, New Education Fellowship, New Education Movement, New Zealand, Oceania, South Asia, Theosophical Society, Theosophy

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Abstract/Notes: Purpose It is well-known that Beatrice Ensor, who founded the New Education Fellowship (NEF) in 1921, was a Theosophist and that from 1915 the Theosophical Fraternity in Education she established laid the foundations for the NEF. However, little research has been performed on the Fraternity itself. The travels of Theosophists, texts, money and ideas between Auckland, India and London from the late nineteenth century offer insights into “New Education” networking in the British Commonwealth more broadly. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach This paper draws on archival documents from the Adyar Library and Research Centre, International Theosophical Society (TS) headquarters, Chennai, India; the archive at the headquarters of the New Zealand Section of the TS, Epsom, Auckland; the NEF files at the archive of the London Institute of Education; papers past digital newspaper archive. Findings New Zealand’s first affiliated NEF group was set up by the principal of the Vasanta Gardens Theosophical School, Epsom, in 1933. She was also involved in the New Zealand Section of the Theosophical Fraternity, which held conferences from 1917 to 1927. New Zealand’s Fraternity and Theosophical Education Trust had close links with their counterparts in England and India. The setting up of New Zealand’s first NEF group was enabled by networks created between Theosophists in New Zealand, India and England from the late nineteenth century. Originality/value The contribution of Theosophists to the new education movement has received little attention internationally. Theosophical educational theory and Theosophists’ contributions to New Zealand Education have not previously been studied. Combining transnational historiography with critical geography, this case study of networks between New Zealand, Adyar (India) and London lays groundwork for a wider “spatial history” of Theosophy and new education.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1108/HER-10-2015-0024

ISSN: 0819-8691

Article

The Montessori Movement

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 16, no. 1

Pages: 5-13

Albert Max Joosten - Writings, Asia, India, South Asia, Montessori method of education - History, Montessori movement, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: The development of the Montessori movement is followed from Montessori's birth and her work with children in Italy to its history in India, where Dr. Montessori lived and worked for ten years offering teacher training programs in India. These classes gave special consideration to conditions in India and placed particular emphasis on the Montessori method as a practical means to ensure and foster principles of nonviolence in the relationship between the adult and fhe child. Urgent tasks that still remain for the movement in India include wider availability to the poor and those in rural areas and the need for government involvement to achieve it. This article, in its historical approach, provides insight into Montessori international origins and their motivation for social change. (Reprinted from Around the Child I, 1956.)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Performing Gender, Class and Nation: Rukmini Devi Arundale and the Impact of Kalakshetra

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: South Asia Research, vol. 39, no. 3_suppl

Pages: 61S-79S

Asia, India, Kalakshetra (Institute: Chennai, India), Rukmini Devi Arundale - Biographic sources, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Rukmini Devi Arundale, herself a choreographer and dancer, is considered one of the key figures in re-creating Bharatanatyam. Through her utopian arts colony, Kalakshetra, started during the movement towards Indian independence, she taught what she deemed to be a classical, religious and aesthetically pleasing form of dance. Her rejection of what she termed vulgarity and commercialism in dance reflects her Theosophical worldviews and her class position in a rapidly changing South India. The article examines the ways in which her understanding of Bharatanatyam developed in the context of contested forms of nationalism as a gender regime that contributed to creating proper middle-class, Hindu and Indian subjects. It also examines the impacts of this form of cultural heritage relating to gender, culture and nationalism in today’s globalised South Asian dance scenario.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/0262728019872612

ISSN: 0262-7280

Article

Education for Tomorrow: The Vision of Rabindranath Tagore

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Asian Studies Review, vol. 40, no. 1

Pages: 1-16

Asia, India, Rabindranath Tagore, Rabindranath Tagore - Biographic sources, Santiniketan (India), South Asia, Sriniketan (India), Viśva Bhāratī

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Abstract/Notes: This article investigates Rabindranath Tagore’s educational vision, which underpinned the three institutions he set up in India – Santiniketan (1901), Visva-Bharati (1921) and Sriniketan (1922). It argues that this vision is still relevant for the world of today and tomorrow, and that it should be taken into account in designing any educational model for the future. Tagore rejected the modern mechanical learning that focuses merely on cultivation of the individual’s mind, in favour of learning that encourages the creativity, imagination and moral awareness of students. He believed that education should be not for mere “success” or “progress” but for “illumination of heart” and for inculcation of a spirit of sympathy, service and self-sacrifice in the individual, so that s/he could rise above egocentrism and ethnocentrism to a state of global consciousness or worldcentrism. In pursuing this argument, I refer to Tagore’s letters, lectures, interviews and essays, both in Bengali and in English, a body of his short stories, his novel The Home and the World and his allegorical poem “Two Birds”. I also explain his awareness of the educational movements of his time in the West, and draw brief parallels with selected Western luminaries in the field, such as Plato, Montaigne, Rousseau and John Dewey. My contention is that although some may dismiss Tagore’s educational principles as “rickety sentimentalism” in a world that is palpable and real, his ideas of human fellowship, unity and creativity, and kinship for nature seem irrefutable with the rise of multiculturalism and the looming ecological crisis threatening world peace.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/10357823.2015.1125441

ISSN: 1035-7823

Article

Benediction

Available from: Stadsarchief Amsterdam (Amsterdam City Archives)

Publication: Around the Child, vol. 5

Pages: i

Asia, India, Indian Montessori Training Course (24th, Delhi, India, 1959-1960), South Asia, Trainings, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Accompanied by a photo of Radindranath Tagore and on opposing page a photo of "Dr. Maria Montessori with an Indian Child."

Language: English

ISSN: 0571-1142

Book Section

The Need for Order

Book Title: Creative Development in the Child: The Montessori Approach

Pages: 12-18

Asia, India, Maria Montessori - Speeches, addresses, etc., South Asia, Organization, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Maria Montessori lectured in Italian during the first International Montessori Course in 1939 at Madras, India. These 75 lectures were translated into English by her son Mario, as she spoke. And were taken down near verbatim in short hand, transcribed and set into galleys overnight. One such set of proofs forms the original manuscript for this book. For the most part, each chapter in this book encompasses a single lecture. The lectures are left in the same order as they were given, swinging between psychology and the use of the materials. India’s diversity of language, social custom and religious practice enriched her research. During this time, Dr. Montessori worked with children in Madras and put into practice her theories of adapting the environment, furniture and the Practical Life materials to local conditions. In these lectures, Maria Montessori speaks with the mature wisdom of a lifetime spent studying, not just early childhood, but human development as a whole and gives a complete, wonderful and colorful overview of her pedagogy and philosophy.

Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company, 2020

ISBN: 978-90-79506-52-1

Series: The Montessori Series , 24

Book Section

The Power of Movement

Book Title: Creative Development in the Child: The Montessori Approach

Pages: 4-7

Asia, Child development, India, South Asia, Maria Montessori - Writings, Movement education, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Maria Montessori lectured in Italian during the first International Montessori Course in 1939 at Madras, India. These 75 lectures were translated into English by her son Mario, as she spoke. And were taken down near verbatim in short hand, transcribed and set into galleys overnight. One such set of proofs forms the original manuscript for this book. For the most part, each chapter in this book encompasses a single lecture. The lectures are left in the same order as they were given, swinging between psychology and the use of the materials. India’s diversity of language, social custom and religious practice enriched her research. During this time, Dr. Montessori worked with children in Madras and put into practice her theories of adapting the environment, furniture and the Practical Life materials to local conditions. In these lectures, Maria Montessori speaks with the mature wisdom of a lifetime spent studying, not just early childhood, but human development as a whole and gives a complete, wonderful and colorful overview of her pedagogy and philosophy.

Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company, 2020

ISBN: 978-90-79506-52-1

Series: The Montessori Series , 24

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