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Article

Where Do I Fit In?

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 25, no. 1

Pages: 20-23

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: The children and staff at Council Oak Montessori enjoy a unique opportunity to experience Dr. Montessori's theory of Cosmic Education through all of its stages--from the 3-year-old who first comes to the school to the 15-year-old who completes its Middle School program. And it makes the author thinks much more actively about how the faculty and staff lay the foundation for this experience in Children's House. The Children's House, physically and philosophically, reflects Dr. Montessori's belief that children are better prepared to be independent, confident, and responsible individuals through Cosmic Education. Montessori maintained that children learn best in an environment that encourages freedom of movement and discovery, and a space to develop an early understanding about their place as individuals in the universe. In the Children's House, the prepared environment provides an order that allows for educating the whole child in every aspect, from the use of materials that lead to natural consequences to furniture and works specifically designed for small hands.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Report

The Sands School Project: First-Year Results

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: This study was initiated to make a preliminary evaluation of the effects of Montessori education when children continued with the same method in public schools that they experienced in prekindergarten. Subjects were 72 black 5- and 6-year-olds from lower-middle and lower economic class families. There were two experimental classes in nongraded primary classrooms. One experimental group had Montessori preschool experience; the other, Head Start. Two control groups had conventional public classroom experience. One control group had experienced Head Start; the other had no formal preschool education. In a multiple-assessment procedure, children were measured according to ability(1) to create novel solutions to a maze puzzle; (2) to match appropriate objects among a sample of 3; (3) to separate an item from the field or context of which it is a part; (4) to control and restrain impulse action (Draw-a-Line-Slowly); (5) to repeat sentences (WPPSI); and (6) to initiate investigative behavior (curiosity measures.) Findings indicated that the non-graded primary combined with preschool experience showed the best results; subtracting either preschool or non-graded practices reduced the progress of the children. (AJ)

Language: English

Published: Cincinnati, Ohio, 1968

Article

A World Of Learning In Chicago

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 27, no. 2

Pages: 15

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Abstract/Notes: The school's varied studies of natural, political, and cultural geography, at both the Elementary and Middle School levels, prepare students to have a broad global awareness.(AMS-Accredited School) THE NEW SCHOOL OF LANCASTER LANCASTER, PA Earlier this year, the New School of Lancaster's Sustainability Fund Committee approved grants for teacher- and parent-led projects to enhance students' experiences; the projects, from raised garden beds to filmmaking equipment, will be funded with $24,000 from an endowment initiated last year by the school.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Qian tan meng te suo li jiao yu fa zai you er jiao yu zhong de ying yong / 浅谈蒙特梭利教育法在幼儿教育中的应用 [Talking about the application of Montessori education method in early childhood education]

Publication: Zhong xiao xue jiao xue yan jiu / 中小學敎學硏究 [Teaching Research for Primary and Middle Schools], vol. 2014, no. Z2

Pages: 121-122

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Abstract/Notes: 蒙台梭利(Montessori)教学法是由意大利教育家玛莉亚·蒙特梭利博士倾其毕生经历所创造的,其教学法的精髓在于培养幼儿自觉主动的学习和探索精神。在蒙氏教室里,有丰富多彩的教具,它们都是根据儿童成长发展敏感期所创立的适宜儿童成长的“玩具”,孩子通过自我重复操作教具创新建构完善的人格,在自由操作中得到多方面的能力训练。

Language: Chinese

Doctoral Dissertation

Fostering Prosocial Behaviors in Urban Elementary Schools: A Closer Look at the Montessori Approach

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori education emphasizes the development of prosocial skills, which are correlated with positive educational and behavioral outcomes in both middle-class and low-income school environments. Two recent studies document the effectiveness of the Montessori approach in this area. Historically, the Montessori method, developed in Italy in 1906, became widespread in American independent schools in the 1950s. With the advent of charter school legislation, the number of public Montessori schools serving lower income children has been increasing over the last decade. The purpose of this study was: (a) to observe and describe how Montessori teachers foster prosocial skills, and (b) to explore whether and how this differs in public and private Montessori schools serving students of different backgrounds/SES. Five mixed-age (first-third grade) Montessori classrooms (two private, three public) were observed and videotaped on two occasions between December 2006 and February 2007. An observation tool developed for non-Montessori classrooms was used to record teacher behaviors linked to prosocial skills development. Similar teacher strategies to promote prosocial skills were recorded in both the public and private schools. These similarities were apparent despite vastly different student and school characteristics. A number of teacher strategies typically associated with the promotion of prosocial skills which were emphasized in the observation tool were not observed in either school. The findings of this study raise questions about the use of observation tools outside of the context in which they were developed. This finding may also be attributed to the timing of the observations (in winter), as the teacher behaviors are more likely to be exhibited during the first few months of school. Interviews with teachers and principals also revealed different leadership needs of a start-up school as opposed to an established school.

Language: English

Published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 2007

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Les Écoles Montessori Dans le Monde: La Diversité Interne d’un Réseau en Expansion [Montessori Schools Around the World: The Internal Diversity of an Expanding Network]

Available from: Open Edition

Publication: Revue Internationale d’Éducation de Sèvres, no. 76

Pages: 51-62

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Abstract/Notes: Les écoles Montessori se multiplient dans tous les pays du monde. L’article s’appuie sur l’étude de l’auto-présentation d’une centaine d’écoles, pour montrer qu’elles sont très diverses. Dans un contexte d’accentuation du consumérisme scolaire et du développement de nouvelles classes moyennes des pays émergents soucieuses d’éducation, le succès international de cette pédagogie tient au fait qu’elle est fondée sur l’utilisation d’un matériel très concret qui la rend immédiatement compréhensible et qu’elle est, de toutes les pédagogies nouvelles, la moins subversive et la plus acceptable socialement. Surtout, cette pédagogie réussit à concilier des exigences qui semblent en partie contradictoires : en mettant à la fois l’accent sur les apprentissages académiques précoces et sur le bien-être et l’autonomie des élèves ; en se présentant aussi comme une pédagogie « de l’élite » mais accessible à tous et favorisant la réussite des plus défavorisés ; en conciliant enfin modernité et religion. [Montessori schools are multiplying in all countries of the world. The article is based on the study of the self-presentation of a hundred schools, to show that they are very diverse. In a context of accentuation of school consumerism and the development of new middle classes of emerging countries concerned with education, the international success of this pedagogy is due to the fact that it is based on the use of very concrete material which makes it immediately understandable and that it is, of all new pedagogies, the least subversive and the most socially acceptable. Above all, this pedagogy succeeds in reconciling requirements which seem in part contradictory: by emphasizing both early academic learning and the well-being and autonomy of the pupils; by also presenting itself as an “elite” pedagogy but accessible to all and promoting the success of the most disadvantaged; finally reconciling modernity and religion.]

Language: French

DOI: 10.4000/ries.6047

ISSN: 1254-4590

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Concept of Work in Maria Montessori and Karl Marx

Available from: Philosophy Documentation Center

Publication: Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association, vol. 79

Pages: 247-260

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Abstract/Notes: Surprising as it may appear, the philosophical writings of political economist Karl Marx (1818–1883), and those of philosopher, educator Maria Montessori(1870–1952), show thematic resemblances that invite further exploration. These resemblances reflect both keen awareness of the historical period they shared, but also important common threads in their philosophical anthropology, ethical and political values, and goals. In this paper, I examine one central thread which both take as fundamental, namely, the centrality of work in achieving the harmonious development of humankind. I critique Marx’s description of the dynamic process leading to his classless society, because he fails to supply the proximate, efficient cause or middle term that effects this goal. My thesis is that Montessori supplies this missing causal link through her scientific demonstration of the work and function of the child and her holistic understanding of the human person in its full historical dimension, and human and cosmic telos.

Language: English

DOI: 10.5840/acpaproc20057925

ISSN: 0065-7638

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Effectiveness of a Counseling Program Based on the Use of Montessori Method on Adaptive Environmental Behavior in a Sample of Children with Mild Intellectual Disability

Available from: The Egyptian Knowledge Bank

Publication: Journal of Environmental Science, vol. 49, no. 9

Pages: 181-216

Africa, Children with disabilities, Counseling, Egypt, Middle East, Montessori method of education, North Africa

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Abstract/Notes: The present study aims to identify the effectiveness of a counseling program based on the use of the Montessori method on the environmental adaptive behavior in a sample of children with mild intellectual disabilities, identifying also the differences in the level of behavioral adaptation in a sample of children on the adaptive behavior scale pre/post application of the program. The researchers define a sample of (40) items, applied to a sample consisting of (40) children with mild intellectual disabilities, aged between (10-12) years, selected from boys, divided equally to (20) experimental samples and (20) control samples, from Al-Ghafir Foundation for people with special needs. The researcher has used the (experimental) method and applied the scale of adaptive behavior. The research has come to several results, the most important of which is that there is a statistically significant correlation between the average scores of the control group and the experimental group, regarding the post application of the total adaptive behavior scale. There are statistically significant differences between the average scores of the experimental group, regarding the post/ follow up application of the adaptive behavioral scale. There are statistically significant differences between the average scores of the control group and the experimental group regarding the post-application of the total behavior scale, in favor of the experimental group. The research reached a set of recommendations, the most important of which are: the necessity of providing the necessary tools for developing skills for children with disabilities within government institutions, setting a special budget.

Language: Arabic

DOI: 10.21608/jes.2020.206380

ISSN: 1110-0826

Article

The Effect of Using Montessori Method on Developing Kindergartener's Speaking and Reading skills

Available from: The Egyptian Knowledge Bank

Publication: مجلة التربية في القرن 21 للدراسات التربوية والنفسية [Journal of Education in the 21st Century for Educational and Psychological Studies], vol. 1, no. 10

Pages: 1-23 (Article 3)

Africa, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Egypt, Language development, Middle East, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North Africa, Reading - Academic achievement

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Abstract/Notes: play and have fun, the learning and teaching processes should be suited totheir nature. There is a number of known interesting learning activitieswhich are based on the arts, games and other oral activities. Thus Englishshould be taught as a means of communication and researchers should dotheir best to help EFL learners to develop their reading and speaking skills.Ur (2000: 12) declared that "out of all the four skills ,listening,speaking, reading and writing, speaking seems the most important, peoplewho speak a language are known as speakers of the language, as if speakingincluded all other kinds of knowing a target language" Today, many secondlanguage learners give the speaking skill priority in their learning because ifthey master this skill then they will be considered as if they have masteredall of the other skills.The importance of speaking is best shown with the integration of theother language skills. For instance, speaking can help students develop theirvocabulary and grammar and improve their writing skill. Ability to read isthe primary fundamental skill required for children to achieve academicsuccess. Currently, the expectation is that all children should begin readingearly and be able to read on grade level by third grade (U.S. Department ofEducation, 2002)Another way that speaking and reading are connected is throughdecoding .decoding is the process of pulling apart the sounds that each(1)letter makes, and then putting them back together to make a word.it is mucheasier for a child to sound out a word on the page that they have alreadyheard in conversation, than a completely new word. There less informationto process since the meaning and the pronunciation of the word are alreadyknown. A child who has heard more words spoken is at an advantage whenlearning to read, the skill of reading is special and often difficult to acquire.the fact that anyone learns how to read is something of a miracle. Learningto read is different from learning to speak; in the development of humanhistory, speaking precedes reading by thousands of yearsItalian educator and physician Maria Montessori developed aninnovative teaching methodology for children that left an indelible mark oneducation curricula throughout the world. Montessori education is a sensorybasedpedagogy that is based on the belief that children learn at their ownpace through manipulation of objects (Lopata, Wallace, & Finn,2005).According to Montessori, (Montessori, 1967, p.14). the goal ofeducation is “to be able to find activities that are so intrinsically meaningfulthat we want to throw ourselves into them” (Crain : 2004) confirmed thisassertion by noting that “when children find tasks that enable them todevelop their naturally emerging capacities, they become interested in themand concentrate deeply on them.In general, there is a need for more research regarding successfuleducational methods and pedagogy for this disenfranchised populationbecause the existing research does not adequately provide educationalplanners with the resources or information to develop effective programs(Williams:2001) examined the impact of the Montessori Method on(2)refugee children‟s social, cognitive and motor development using adifference-in-difference approach .The Montessori method of teachingaimed the fullest possible development of the whole child, ultimatelypreparing him for life‘s many rich experiences. Complemented by hertraining in medicine, psychology and anthropology, Dr .Maria Montessori(1870-1952) developed her philosophy of education based upon actualobservation of children.Students are assigned their own personal workstations designed witheducational items that correspond to the daily lesson plans and activities.Students are responsible for setting up the work area, choosing the learningactivity, applying the physical materials, and returning the materials back tothe shelves (Pickering: 2004).Children are always free to move around theroom and are not given deadlines for the various learning tasks. Desks arearranged into open networks that encourage meaningful group discourse, aswell as independent learning.Students work together with the teachers to organize time strategicallyin order to complete the necessary learning tasks of the day. The amount ofteachers in the classroom varies based on class size, but usually two teachersare used for sections with thirty or more students, In most settings, childrenare grouped in mixed ages and abilities based on three to six-year incrementssuch as 0-3, 3-6, 6-12, 12-15 and 15-18 (other Montessori schools use onlythree year increment settings). Ages are mixed so that older students canassist and mentor the younger children in the group. Students are groupedaccording to common interests and experiences rather than the ability andskill level (Pickering: 2004).According to Montessori, from birth to age three the child learnsprimarily through the “unconscious absorbent mind.” During education in(3)the first three years, Montessori believed that it was necessary for theparents to develop in the role of unobtrusive educator; there to protect andguide without infringing on the child‟s right to self-discovery (Crain: 2004).This early developmental model enabled children to learn their own skillsat their own place. During the ages of three to six the child begins to utilizethe “conscious absorbent mind” which prompts students to participate increative problem-solving consisting of wooden and metal objects of varioussizes and shapes, personally designed by Montessori. If a problem becomestoo difficult or overwhelming for the student, the teacher delays the projectfor a future day. Children also engage in practical work consisting ofhousehold tasks and personal maintenance.

Language: Arabic

DOI: 10.21608/jsep.2020.84322

ISSN: 2682-1931

Article

Challenges of Implementing Montessori English Teaching Model in Saudi Arabian Elementary Schools

Available from: The Egyptian Knowledge Bank

Publication: مجلة دراسات في المناهج وطرق التدريس [Journal of Studies in Curriculum and Teaching Methods], no. 245

Pages: 1-25 (Article 2)

Asia, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Middle East, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Saudi Arabia, Western Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori English Teaching Model (METM) is a unique way of instruction that uses specifically designed learning settings and approaches to nurture students' intrinsic desire to learn. English achievements for Saudi students have been for long very low. The current study aimed to investigate the real challenges of implementing Montessori English Teaching Model in Saudi Arabian elementary schools. Qualitative method, namely focus group discussion, was used. Four purposive focus groups with different educational positions and experiences were formulated, namely school supervisors (SS), school principals (SP), English teachers (ET), and English curriculum specialists (ES). The major findings of the study were that1) major challenges existed for implementing the METM in Saudi elementary schools, 2) the challenges concentrated on four categories: educational context, work ethics and environment, nature of teachers and students, and social aspects, and 3) agreements on some of the sub-themes fluctuated. Recommendations for further investigations are made for interested and educational personnel.

Language: Arabic

DOI: 10.21608/mjat.2019.101825

ISSN: 2535-213X

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