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587 results

Doctoral Dissertation

An Historical Analysis of the Role of Magnet Schools in the Desegregation of Riverview School District

Available from: University of Illinois - IDEALS

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Abstract/Notes: This historical study provides a concise history of desegregation in public schools in the United States and the subsequent establishment of magnet schools. An historical timeline from the establishment of the first magnet schools to current magnet schools models of excellence was presented. Equity theory framed this study as educational practitioners continue to strive for equal access to educational programs for all students. This study examined historical, racial, and socio-economic data from a school district in central Illinois that established magnet programs in 1979 to stop White flight. The results of the study included information regarding the historical and political events that led to the establishment of magnet programs. Additional data examined if the magnet programs led to improved integration in the school district and if there were differences between students enrolled in both the magnet classes and the non-magnet classes in terms of race and socio-economic status. The study found that there were many factors which led to the establishment of the magnet programs in Riverview. Additionally, the study found that the magnet programs did not accomplish their initial task, and that there are some significant racial and socio-economic differences between students enrolled in magnet and non-magnet classes. Recommendations for further study were provided.

Language: English

Published: Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, 2015

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Montessori Early Childhood Teacher Perceptions of Family Priorities and Stressors

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 1, no. 1

Pages: 1-13

Perceptions

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Abstract/Notes: Teachers of young children work closely with families. One component of teacher-family partnerships is teachers’ understanding of family priorities and stressors. This study examines Montessori early childhood (ages three through six) teacher perceptions of family priorities and stressors through an analysis of responses to two parallel surveys. Eighty teachers (37% of those who received the survey) and forty-nine family members (representing a 55% response rate) completed the survey. Significant differences were found between teachers’ perceptions of four (of seven) family priorities and families’ actual responses. Teachers ranked “making academic progress” as the most important of seven possible family priorities. However, families stated that “developing kindness” is the most important priority for their young children. No significant differences were found when comparing teacher rankings of family stressors with actual family responses. Montessori early childhood teachers ranked “not having enough time” as the most stressful of six possible stressors. Families confirmed that time pressures cause them the most stress. Maria Montessori’s recommendations for teachers and families are summarized. Recommendations for building stronger family partnerships in the context of Montessori’s philosophy, for example on-going self-reflection, are provided.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v1i1.4939

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

Maria Montessori and Educational Forces in America

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 19, no. 1

Pages: 34-47

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: When Maria Montessori addressed two wildly enthusiastic American audiences at Carnegie Hall in December 1913, she thrilled the parents in attendance, but sent a shock wave through the educational establishment. Instead of accommodating skeptics from the teacher-training institutions seated there that night, she appealed directly to parents who found in the Montessori message an antidote to the miasma in their children's schools. Subsequently, the educational establishment that found more to dislike than to admire in Montessori marshaled their considerable power to discourage any permanent American Montessori movement for years to come. This article explores the clash between Montessori and optimistic American families versus the American educational establishment of the time. For further historical perspective, the author offers an analysis of the growth of the kindergarten movement and the emergence of progressivism in education as an outgrowth of the American Progressive movement at the turn of the 20th century. Maria Montessori's presentations at Carnegie Hall occurred at the apex of these convulsive forces.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

An Excerpt from Diverse Families, Desirable Schools: Public Montessori in the Era of School Choice

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 31, no. 2

Pages: 55

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: In a Boston Globe Sunday Magazine feature, the school was described as a "a scrubbed oasis," in a neighborhood of vacant lots and empty buildings, overseen by Gadpaille, "an angel priestess in red oxfords and a blue smock." Though she started her teaching career at private, predominantly White Montessori schools, including Rambusch's Whitby School, and as the founding director of Lexington Montessori School, Gadpaille's Montessori Family Center was designed for Roxbury's working-class Black families, offering full-day year-round childcare with half of the children attending tuition free through Head Start funding. Gadpaille envisioned a community of 150 Black-owned homes centered around a Montessori school serving ages birth to 18, and she recruited famed architect R. Buckminster Fuller, noted for his space-age geodesic domes, who skipped part of his Harvard reunion to volunteer the design.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Culture, Race, Diversity: How Montessori Spells Success in Public Schools

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 18, no. 4

Pages: 9

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Addressing the many complex issues associated with culture, race, and diversity is tough under any circumstances. But such issues become even more complex in school settings where large numbers of students speak different languages and reflect diverse ethnicities and socioeconomic statuses. In this article, the author describes how the faculty members and the administrators at Fort Wayne Community Schools (FWCS) in Indiana found a balance between quality education and student diversity. FWCS offers a district-wide school choice program that features a number of different educational offerings. Interestingly, as the district's student population (nearly 32,000) has become increasingly diverse--it now has about 80 languages/dialects represented by students--its Montessori magnet program has grown more successful. The author also relates that FWCS' Montessori magnet program is superbly suited to prepare students to flourish in culturally and racially diverse environments. As such, it is highly in demand among parents.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Renewing Children's House Science: A Study of the Past with an Eye Toward the Future

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 27, no. 3

Pages: 46-53

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Wherever elementary school students sprout beans, grow sugar crystals from solution, and count the number of robins in their yards, the Handbook exerts its influence. When Mario's American emissary Nancy Rambusch requested more scientific rigor in the training process, as well as other changes, Mario refused, and they parted ways in 1963 (Whitescarver & Cossentino, 2006, p. 4). Since this schism, the Early Childhood science area has not evolved much in AMS or AMI teacher education. In a widely circulated position paper, the National Science Teachers Association stated that "learning science and engineering in the early years can foster children's curiosity and enjoyment in exploring the world and lay the foundation for a progression of science learning in K-12 settings and their entire lives" (NSTA, 2014, p. 1). Adding physical science to the Early Childhood curriculum, as well as introducing engineering and technology, seems especially relevant given that: [The] National Science Foundation's Discovery Research K-12 program has begun to solicit and fund proposals to study science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) educational programs that support prekindergarten children and those who teach them.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

What Belongs in a Montessori Primary Classroom?

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 23, no. 3

Pages: 18-32

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: There are two major types of Montessori teacher education in the United States: (1) AMI-USA (the American branch of the Association Montessori Internationale, founded by Dr. Montessori to carry on her work); and (2) AMS (American Montessori Society, founded by Nancy Rambusch to represent Montessori in America). This article presents the results from a survey which points out what materials are highly agreed on by teacher educators from both AMI and AMS centers to be necessary and/or desirable in a Montessori Primary classroom. There is a large set of agreed-upon materials across most areas, and with Art and Science/Geography--two areas to which Montessori herself allocated little attention in discussions of the first plane of development. For other areas, when there were divergences, they stemmed from two sources: (1) materials appearing to aim too high or too low (some Math and Language materials, for example, that are for children more advanced or some Practical Life materials that are preliminary to other skills); or (2) divergent opinions as to whether the activity has a clear positive developmental purpose (the tape recorder or fantasy books, for example). (Contains 2 footnotes.)

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Montessori Elementary Philosophy Reflects Current Motivation Theories

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 23, no. 1

Pages: 22-33

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori's theories, developed more than 100 years ago, certainly resonate with current psychological research on improving education. Autonomy, interest, competence, and relatedness form the foundation for three contemporary efforts to organize the vast literature on motivation into a parsimonious theory. These four elements also comprise fundamental aspects of Montessori elementary educational practice. By integrating modern motivation theory development with well-established Montessori practice, one could argue that Maria Montessori was a woman before her time. She was passionate in the early 1900s about the importance of students becoming actively engaged in their own learning. Montessori schools around the world today live that vision through practices that are beginning to be recognized as crucial to the formation of internal motivation. (Contains 1 figure.)

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Prospects of Morality-Based Education in the 21st Century

Available from: University of Management and Technology (Pakistan)

Publication: Journal of Islamic Thought and Civilization, vol. 11, no. 1

Pages: 1-21

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Abstract/Notes: This article proposes to re-focus education towards morality and universal values, which have always been the traditional aim of education. This paper is designed using a qualitative research method applying content analysis to textual and video materials from a historical and contemporary perspectives. The paper demonstrates morality problems of the current mainstream education systems and how alternative systems are better equipped to inculcate values. It is observed that trans-disciplinary, problem-based and religious education helps build stronger ethical foundation in students regardless of their geographical location or income levels. The article proposes for schools and universities to include community engagement programmes in their curricula, support religious communities through special programmes, and promote values education at all levels not through academic subjects but through studies, research and development of real-life application of ethics at local and international levels. The paper adds value to existing research on ethics and values-based education and calls for further research in the field of education. It is also relevant to policy makers and researchers in public policy disciplines.morality-based education, trans-disciplinary approach, holistic education, universal values, ethics, alternative education

Language: English

DOI: 10.32350/jitc.111.01

ISSN: 2520-0313

Doctoral Dissertation

La pédagogie Montessori entre tradition et innovation: le cas de l'enseignement de la correspondance grapho-phonologique en français [Montessori pedagogy between tradition and innovation: the case of teaching grapho-phonological correspondence in French]

Available from: Theses Portal (France)

Europe, France

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Abstract/Notes: Nous montrons que la pédagogie de Maria Montessori a ses racines d’une part dans le mouvement sensualiste de Comenius, Locke, Condillac et Rousseau, et d’autre part dans celui pédagogique de Pestalozzi, Itard et Séguin. La scientificité de sa conception et la tradition de sa transmission depuis un siècle garantissent sa crédibilité et sa pertinence ; nous constatons une cohérence dans l’ensemble du matériel pour les différentes matières enseignées et dans son emploi pour les enfants de 2 à 6 ans. Cependant, concernant l’apprentissage de la lecture et de l’écriture, des variations importantes peuvent apparaître selon les langues. Ainsi le matériel utilisé aujourd’hui en Angleterre est-il particulièrement développé et performant, alors que celui en usage en France est moins riche ; mais surtout, les « Dictées muettes©» en vogue dans certaines classes nous apparaissent non seulement désuètes mais sans aucun fondement phonologique et seraient avantageusement remplacées par les « Mots-images©» en cours d’expérimentation. À cette condition, la pédagogie montessorienne pourrait être sollicitée pour renouveler l’enseignement des correspondances grapho-phonologiques du français, y compris pour les élèves en difficulté. We show that Maria Montessori’s pedagogy has its roots on the one hand in the sensualist movement of Comenius, Locke, Condillac and Rousseau and on the other hand in the pedagogic movement of Pestalozzi, Itard and Séguin. The scientificity of its conception and its traditional way of transmission since one century guarantees its credibility and its relevance. We ascertain a coherence in the whole of Montessori’s apparatus of the various subjects taught and its use by the children from 2 to 6 years old.    Nevertheless, concerning the learning of reading and writing, there are important variations from language to language.   For instance, the material used today in Great Britain is particularly numerous and impressive, whereas the one used in France is less prolific and effective. Particularly the “Dictées muettes©” that are very fashionable in many classrooms seem to us not only out-of-date but also without any phonologic foundation. It would be beneficial to replace them by the “Mots-images©” (Word-Picture Cards) that are actually under experimentation. It is a prerequisite so the Montessori pedagogy could be adopted to renew the teaching of including to students in remedial education. [We show that Maria Montessori's pedagogy has its roots on the one hand in the sensualist movement of Comenius, Locke, Condillac and Rousseau, and on the other hand in the educational movement of Pestalozzi, Itard and Séguin. The scientific nature of its conception and the tradition of its transmission for a century guarantee its credibility and relevance; we see consistency in all the material for the different subjects taught and in its use for children from 2 to 6 years old. However, when it comes to learning to read and write, there may be significant variations between languages. Thus the equipment used today in England is particularly developed and efficient, while that in use in France is less rich; but above all, the "Dictées muettes ©" in vogue in certain classes appear to us not only obsolete but without any phonological basis and would be advantageously replaced by the "Words-images ©" currently being tested. Under this condition, Montessori pedagogy could be called upon to renew the teaching of grapho-phonological correspondences in French, including for pupils in difficulty. We show that Maria Montessori’s pedagogy has its roots on the one hand in the sensualist movement of Comenius, Locke, Condillac and Rousseau and on the other hand in the pedagogic movement of Pestalozzi, Itard and Séguin. The scientificity of its conception and its traditional way of transmission since one century guarantees its credibility and its relevance. We ascertain a coherence in the whole of Montessori’s apparatus of the various subjects taught and its use by the children from 2 to 6 years old. Nevertheless, concerning the learning of reading and writing, there are important variations from language to language. For instance, the material used today in Great Britain is particularly numerous and impressive, whereas the one used in France is less prolific and effective. Particularly the “Dictées muettes ©” that are very fashionable in many classrooms seem to us not only out-of-date but also without any phonologic foundation. It would be beneficial to replace them by the “Mots-images ©” (Word-Picture Cards) that are actually under experimentation. It is a prerequisite so the Montessori pedagogy could be adopted to renew the teaching of including to students in remedial education.]

Language: French

Published: Nantes, France, 2009

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