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477 results

Article

The Frustrations of Progress

Publication: American Montessori Society Bulletin, vol. 6, no. 2

Pages: 1-8

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Address given to the Annual Conference of the American Association of School Administrators, Atlantic City, NJ, 1968

Language: English

ISSN: 0277-9064

Book Section

Differential Outcomes of a Montessori Curriculum

Book Title: Montessori Schools in America: Historical, Philosophical, and Empirical Research Perspectives

Pages: 143-155

Americas, Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This article was originally published in Elementary School Journal, v. 72, no. 8 (May 1972), p. 419-433. This article also appeared in the American Montessori Society Bulletin - Stodolsky, Susan S., and Alfred L. Karlson. 1973. “Differential Outcomes of a Montessori Curriculum.” American Montessori Society Bulletin 11 (2).

Language: English

Published: Lexington, Massachusetts: Ginn Custom Pub., 1983

Edition: 2nd ed.

ISBN: 0-536-04367-1

Article

Supporting Sensory-Sensitive Children in a Sensory-Intensive World

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 29, no. 1

Pages: 34-39

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, Sensory disorders in children, Sensory integration dysfunction in children, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: For American children with educational challenges, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (or DSM-5) (American Psychiatric Association, 2013), is critically important because inclusion of a disorder in the DSM-5 allows for treatment and support to be paid for by the child's public school district if it interferes with his or her educational achievement. Early parent observation of sensory differences is often a child's first reported sign of autism, occurring as early as 9-12 months of age (Murray-Slutsky & Paris, 2000; Baranek, 2002). * Sensory profiles can distinguish among children with autism, children with ADHD, and children without those diagnoses (Tomchek & Dunn, 2007; Yochman, Parush, & Ornoy, 2004). * Well-developed sensory integration has strong correlation with academic achievement and cognitive processing. Early detection and management of sensory challenges can tie to predicting later academic performance deficits (Parham, 1998; Koenig & Rudney, 2010). * In a review of studies examining links between SI and ADHD, sensory-motor abilities of children with ADHD were lower than those of a control group. Other literature examines connections with disorders ranging from fragile X syndrome, mood disorders, behavioral disorders, and nonverbal learning disabilities (NVLD) to physically based conditions, such as premature birth, prenatal drug exposure, cerebral palsy/spina bifida/ Down syndrome, language delay, and other learning disabilities, as well as environmentally caused deficits, including abuse, neglect, or trauma.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Lessons from the Periphery: The Role of Dispositions in Montessori Teacher Training

Available from: Western Washington University

Publication: Journal of Educational Controversy, vol. 2, no. 2

Jacqueline Mary Cossentino - Writings, Keith Whitescarver - Writings, Montessori method of education, Training, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: In 2002 the term “dispositions” entered the vocabulary of teacher education with a vengeance when the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) added the concept to its inventory of required standards. Teacher education programs across the country developed lists of professional dispositions that their graduates should attain based on NCATE provided guidelines. Caring, fairness, honesty, responsibility, and social justice were values included in NCATE suggestions; these values were emphasized and, subsequently, assessed in teacher education programs. Students who were found lacking in these traits were counseled out of education programs or given unsatisfactory grades, at least at some institutions. A few of the affected students objected to their treatment, and local administrators heard their complaints. Controversy at the local level quickly accelerated to national stories as conservative-leaning newspapers like the New York Post, and conservative commentators like George Will, brought to the attention of the American public what they viewed as the latest round in American culture wars.

Language: English

ISSN: 1935-7699

Book

Bringing Montessori to America: S. S. McClure, Maria Montessori, and the Campaign to Publicize Montessori Education

Americas, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, McClure's Magazine, North America, S. S. McClure - Biographic sources, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Traces in engrossing detail one of the most fascinating partnerships in the history of American education - that between Maria Montessori and S.S. McClure, from their first meeting in 1910 until their final acrimonious dispute in 1915. Gerald and Patricia Gutek trace the dramatic arc of the partnership between the Italian teacher and American publisher united by a vision of educational change.

Language: English

Published: Tuscaloosa, Alabama: University of Alabama Press, 2016

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Anti-Bias Multicultural Education Using Children’s Literature

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This action research project was completed to test the effects of reading and discussing multicultural children’s literature on young children’s positive self-concept and appreciation of human differences. The setting was a Montessori primary (preK-K) classroom of 18 children, ages two years 10 months to five years 10 months. Ten children were White, four were biracial, three were Asian American, and one was Latin American. Data was collected using a tally sheet, picture test, self-concept test, discussion log, and self-assessment journal. Readings took place each day and books centered on topics such as individuality, race, skin color, diversity, inclusion, and activism. The results indicated that children did show a decrease in negative attitudes towards human differences and an increase in positive attitudes towards human differences throughout the intervention. The action plan implications conclude that the study could be conducted with a narrower focus and within an intersectional framework.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2019

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Sign Language on Second Language Acquisition

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This action research project examined the effects of sign language on the ability of primary students to learn new Spanish vocabulary in a bilingual Montessori classroom. The research took place at a public charter Montessori school in Washington, District of Columbia. Twenty-seven primary school aged children were included in this seven-week study. Sources of data collection included a parent-teacher questionnaire, a baseline assessment, daily observation logs, a daily checklist, a weekly journal, and a summative assessment. Students were grouped by Spanish fluency and taught eight different vocabulary words in Spanish. Half of the words were taught alongside a sign in American Sign Language and the other half were taught without an accompanying sign. The summative assessment data showed that students of all ages displayed a significant increase in their ability to recall new Spanish vocabulary words that were introduced with an accompanying sign in American Sign Language. Future research could examine the roles of sign language and gesturing in helping children recall vocabulary in the long-term.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2016

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Songs on Hmong Vocabulary Acquisition

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Americas, Bilingualism, Displaced communities, Hmong (Asian people), Hmong American children, Hmong American families, Hmong songs, Immigrants, Language acquisition, North America, Refugees

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Abstract/Notes: This action research assessed the effects of singing a song to learn language in a bilingual classroom. The research took place at a bilingual Hmong-English Montessori preschool program. 28 preschool-aged children participated in the research which was conducted over five weeks. Data sources included a parent questionnaire, vocabulary pre-test, vocabulary post-test with a follow-up conversation, daily observation logs, and tally sheet. The children were taught 16 Hmong vocabulary words with half the words sung to the tune of a common children’s song and the other half by simple reciting. The results from the vocabulary post-test showed that there was an increase in the children’s ability to recall Hmong vocabulary taught through the song and the follow-up conversation showed that the children enjoyed learning by singing. Further research could examine the continued use of singing vocabulary to common children’s songs and its effects on language learning in the long-term.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2019

Article

Do Not Bequeath a Shamble: The Child in the Twenty First Century: Innocent Hostage to Mindless Oppression or Children as Messengers to the World

Publication: American Montessori Society Bulletin, vol. 18, no. 3

Pages: 1-10

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Paper presented at the 20th Anniversary American Montessori Society Annual Seminar, New York, 1980.

Language: English

ISSN: 0277-9064

Article

Something's Wrong with My Child

Publication: American Montessori Society Bulletin, vol. 13, no. 2

Pages: 1-11

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: From talks presented at the American Montessori Society Seminar, Boston, June, 1974; and Palm Beach Junior College, FL, December, 1974.

Language: English

ISSN: 0277-9064

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