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1293 results

Article

Perfect Organization: Guarantors of Montessori Fund Meet to Make Preliminary Plans

Available from: Newspapers.com

Publication: Stevens Point Journal (Stevens Point, Wisconsin)

Pages: 1

Americas, Helen Parkhurst - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, North America, United States of America

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Language: English

Article

A Montessori Club: First Organization of Kind in State Formed Here

Available from: Newspapers.com

Publication: Stevens Point Journal (Stevens Point, Wisconsin)

Pages: 1

Americas, Helen Parkhurst - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, North America, United States of America

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Language: English

Article

Succeeds Madam Montessori in U.S.

Available from: Newspapers.com

Publication: Stevens Point Journal (Stevens Point, Wisconsin)

Pages: 1

Americas, Helen Parkhurst - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Montessori movement, North America, United States of America

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Language: English

Article

Dr. Montessori Has No Pictures of Self

Available from: Newspapers.com

Publication: Stevens Point Journal (Stevens Point, Wisconsin)

Pages: 1

Americas, Helen Parkhurst - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, North America, United States of America

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Language: English

Article

Remembering Margaret Homfray and Phoebe Child

Publication: Montessori Education, vol. 8, no. 1

Pages: 36

Margaret Homfray - Biographic sources, Obituaries, Phoebe Child - Biographic sources

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Language: English

ISSN: 1354-1498

Master's Thesis

Research and Resources for the Primary Grades in a Montessori Classroom

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Classroom environment, Elementary education, Learning environments, Montessori method of education, Primary education, Reading

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Abstract/Notes: Maria Montessori and Lev Vygotsky believed that children learn best through having personal experiences and social interactions with the people and the environment around them (Lawrence & Snow, 2011; Montessori, 1995; Vygotsky, 1978). Students lose important general classroom instructional time and learning opportunities when they are pulled out to receive reading intervention lessons. When teachers collaborate and approach reading intervention in a connected way, while providing explicit instruction to the students, learning is capitalized. Grounded in the Sociocultural theory, this study and project aimed to address the learning needs of students who struggle with reading in the primary grades of the general education classroom. Anchored in culturally responsive teaching techniques, the research in this project highlight ways teachers are able to respect the diverse student populations housed in American classrooms in respectful and motivating ways. The methods used in this study was in the form of qualitative and quantitative research through conducting surveys. Survey participants were Lead Teachers, Teacher Assistants, and Reading Specialists in a Montessori Setting. The results of the feedback received from the surveys tailored the handbook of resources that will help meet the reading needs for students who struggle with learning how to read. Additionally, this study provides recommendations in addressing reading motivation and identifying the responsibilities of literacy professionals at the school and network level that are rooted in International Literacy Association Standards.

Language: English

Published: Sacramento, California, 2022

Article

Mrs. Ernest Thomson-Seton at Opening of Montessori School for New York Tenement Children

Available from: ProQuest Historical Newspapers

Publication: The Evening Record (Windsor, Ontario, Canada)

Pages: 8

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Abstract/Notes: "To prove that the Montessori system of education is both practical and available for the poor children of the tenements as well as for those who have every advantage that can be had for money, is the purpose of the Montessori Educational Association, which has just established a school for poor children in the upper East Side in one of the most thronged of the tenement sections of New York. The Montessori idea of education is diametrically opposed to the system in vogue. All the time commonly spent in training children to be passive is in the Montessori schools spent in awakening activity and encouraging initiative. Dr. Montessori, the founder of the new system of education, says that one of the most important tasks of the teacher lies in 'seeing that the child does not confound the idea of good with immobility, and evil with activity.' Instead of devoting months of arduous labor drilling the alphabet and elements of reading and writing into the heads of the little children, Montessori methods develop the various senses which give them control of the apparatur through which they must get all their knowledge of the world. One of the most remarkable things notied by the observers of the new school was the spontaneity with which the children learned to write. From tracing sand-paper letters and building of words by the aid of blocks, many of the children took up bits of chalk and began to write, not a few, but many words. The children learn to observe, to reason and to use their senses rather than clog their memoriy with useless rules. The school furnishes the little tots with luncheon, but even in this they are stimulated to activity. They have little waitresses who learn to move about freely and gracefully, to carry things without breaking them, and to avoid clumsiness and awkwardness. When the meal is over the children will all go into their small kitchen, roll up their sleeves and wash the dishes from which they had been eating. The picture shows Mrs. Ernest Thompson-Seton, the wife of Ernest Thompson-Seton, the Canadian author and naturalist, who is one of the trustees of the Montessori Educational Association, telling a little waitress to pose for the picture."

Language: English

Article

Famous Dr. Montessori Begins to Teach L. A. Children Next Monday

Available from: Newspapers.com

Publication: Los Angeles Record (Los Angeles, California)

Pages: 4

Americas, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: "Dr. Maria Montessori, the noted Italian educator, who has won such renown throughout the world for her discovery of new methods of teaching little children, will begin her third international demonstration classes at Boyle Heights intermediate school Monday. These sun-kissed, happy, healthy little children, pupils of the Montessori class, established by Miss Katherine Moore of this city at East Seventh st. school will constitute one of the three groups to be taught during the demonstration. EDUCATORS COME HERE. Notable educators from all parts of the United States are arriving daily to attend the instruction course which Dr. Montessori will give during her stay. The course will continue two months. This will be the first time the famed teacher of little children has ever conducted a demonstration class outside of Rome, Italy. Though invited to give this third international class at many notable points in this country, she has chosen Los Angeles. There are probably three reasons for this. The first, perhaps, is the fact that Miss Katherine Moore, teacher of the local Montessori classes, was a favorite student and a member of the first class graduated by Dr. Montessori in Rome. FORMS FIRST CLASS. The second, probably, is the fact that Miss Moore established the Montessori system in Los Angeles, making it the first place in this country to follow the specific teachings of the Italian educator. The third is the fact that scores of invitations have been issued by various educational organizations in this city. SHOWER BATH. Preparations for the gala event are already in order at the East Seventh st. school. Each day of demonstration classes, the 30 youngsters representing seven or eight nationalities, none Americans, will be taken from their school to the Boyle Heights Intermediate school on the car. Though the children don't understand just what it is all about, they know they are to have a treat of some sort. The idea of a car ride is a joy in itself for them. The board of education has granted Principal Larkey of the East Seventh st. school sufficient funds to pay for transportation. The first thing on the program each morning for these 30 expectant youngsters will be a shower bath apiece. Then each will be dressed in clean little aprons and the trip started. There are three Montessori schools in this divinity, all started by Miss Moore. The other two are at St. Catherine's school on West Adams st. and in the Hotel Maryland at Pasadena. Dr. Montessori will go from here to San Diego, where the exposition committee has appropriated $1000 for equipment and a building in which she can hold her classes. Later she goes to San Francisco."

Language: English

Article

ドルトン・プランの成立過程とヘレン・パーカーストの思想形成 [The Development of the Dalton Plan and the Growth of the Thought of Helen Parkhurst]

Available from: J-Stage

Publication: Nihon no kyoiku shigaku: Kyoikushi gakkai kiyo / 日本の教育史学: 教育史学会紀要 / Studies in the history of education : research bulletin of the Japan Society for Historical Studies of Education, vol. 42

Pages: 132-148

Americas, Dalton laboratory plan - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Helen Parkhurst - Biographic sources, Helen Parkhurst - Philosophy, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, North America, United States of America

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Language: Japanese

DOI: 10.15062/kyouikushigaku.42.0_132

ISSN: 2189-4485, 0386-8982

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