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476 results

Article

Directory of American Montessori Teachers, December 1964

Publication: Bulletin of the American Montessori Teachers

Pages: D1-D14

American Montessori Society (AMS), Americas, North America, United States of America

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Language: English

Conference Paper

Continuous Progress Evaluation of American Indian Preschoolers

Available from: ERIC

Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (Washington, DC, March 30-April 3, 1975)

Americas, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Monthly testing based on a counterbalanced matrix sampling plan in one psychomotor, three affective, and five cognitive areas provides a continuous picture of the development of native American children enrolled in three distinct curricula. Of the nine scales, one showed negative, two showed insignificant, and six showed significant positive changes. When compared with national norms, the results suggest that all three curricula have strong remedial effects across a broad range of important areas of preschool learning. (Author)

Language: English

Pages: 20

Article

A Tribute to Cleo Monson: First National Director of the American Montessori Society

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 22, no. 3

Pages: 18-25

American Montessori Society (AMS) - History, Americas, Cleo Monson - Biographic sources, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The early 1960s was a critical, albeit chaotic, period for the revival of the Montessori movement, which had been recently rekindled in the United States. The success or failure of the movement can arguably be said to have rested squarely upon the backs of those founding members and early supporters of the fledgling American Montessori Society, (AMS) which, in its infancy, was trembling under the weight of its own potential success--a social, cultural, and spiritual phenomena that was enfolded within an educational philosophy and methodology. The organization was vulnerable, and there was no way of predicting its future success or failure. There was no question that someone was needed to handle office affairs, and the importance of bringing the right person in for that job, at that specific time in the history of AMS, could not be minimized--although the full weight of the consequence of that hiring decision 50 years ago can be understood only in retrospect. Help was urgently needed, and it was soon to arrive in the person of Cleo Monson. As it happened, Monson embodied the essential traits and skills paramount to accomplishing the job, and she would later be credited, by many who knew her both professionally, as the critical pillar upon which would rest the survival and success of the AMS. (Contains 1 footnote.)

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Recollections and Reflections: The American Montessori Society

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 22, no. 1

Pages: 24-27

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Abstract/Notes: In this article, the author shares some of his recollections around the birth of the American Montessori Society (AMS), beginning in the 1950s. He explains the way AMS evolved in its earliest days which reveals something of who its members are now and how they have been part of the 50-year journey. He adds that by recounting the past, members of the American Montessori Society are able to connect what happened in the first days of AMS with the mission of the Society today.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

A Vision of the Future: American Montessori and the "Erdkinder"

Publication: Montessori Matters

Pages: 15–21, 24

Americas, Conferences, Montessori organizations - United States of America, North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Conferences, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Review of NAMTA conference, "Montessori Secondary in Action"; visits to American schools

Language: English

Honors Thesis

The Great Italian Educator: The Montessori Method and American Nativism in the 1910s

Available from: University of Kansas

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this project is to investigate to what extent Protestant nativism impeded the spread of the Montessori Method in the United States. The Montessori Method has experienced waves of popularity in America ever since it was first introduced in 1910. During the first wave of popularity, from 1910-1917, Dr. Maria Montessori, the founder, faced backlash from educators and educational philosophers for her scientific reasoning and her pedagogical and social philosophies. Some Montessori historians believe that these factors were critical in halting the spread of the Montessori Method in America in 1917. An additional theory is that Montessori’s personal identity, as an Italian Catholic woman, impeded the reception of her ideas in America. Considering that the time period was characterized by anti-Catholic rhetoric from political organizations as well as newspapers and journals, the theory makes sense. Research for this project was conducted by examining newspaper publications that covered the Montessori Method, rebuttals of the method published by American educators, and the books and articles written by Montessori advocates. Other primary sources include Catholic publications and Dr. Montessori’s own books and writings. Secondary sources, such as autobiographies of Maria Montessori’s life and examinations of nativist activity at the beginning of the 20th Century, help paint a picture of the state of America when Dr. Montessori visited in 1913. Overall, these sources indicate that anti-Catholic sentiments played a minor role, if any, in hampering the spread of the Montessori Method. Maria Montessori’s publicist, Samuel S. McClure, crafted a particular public image for Montessori, compatible with themes of social reform, Progressive educational reform, and feminism, which would appeal to most Americans. The creation of this public image is significant as it was a manifestation of the cultural upheaval experienced during the early 20th century and had lasting implications for Progressive education and the future of the Montessori Method in America. Supporters for the method emphasized the scientific foundation of the method, Dr. Montessori’s ideas for social reform through education, and the compatibility of the method with American ideals of individual freedom and responsibility. In the end, other factors such as leading educators’ disapproval of different aspects of the method, World War I, and Dr. Montessori’s personality led to the decline of the Montessori Method in America at that time.

Language: English

Published: Lawrence, Kansas, Apr 2019

Article

Learn Montessori Method: Sixty-seven of the 87 Enrolled at Italian School Are Americans

Publication: New York Times (New York, New York)

Pages: C5

Americas, Europe, Italy, Montessori method of education, North America, Southern Europe, Trainings, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: ROME, March 15. -- The Montessori system of teaching is attracting so much attention in the United States that the American committee has enrolled forty-two new students to come to Rome for direct instruction under Dr. Maria Montessori herself, making altogether a class of eighty-seven, of whom sixty-seven are Americans.

Language: English

ISSN: 0362-4331

Article

The American Montessori Society, Inc.

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 22, no. 1

Pages: 28-35

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Abstract/Notes: This article offers a brief history of the establishment of the American Montessori Society (AMS) and takes a closer look at its structure. The history of AMS has essentially been a search for standards and a search for community in its efforts to further the welfare of children in America. It has been an indigenous effort by American parents, and others who shared their concerns, to obtain the kind of educational and cultural development their children need for life today and for the life they will experience in their maturity during the twenty-first century. The AMS from the very beginning has been more a symbol than the reality of an adequately financed and staffed national organization. It is composed of professional and lay members and seeks to extend the use of Montessori principles and practices within the educational and cultural environment of America. (Contains 4 footnotes.)

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Book

Montessori in Contemporary American Culture

Available from: Books to Borrow @ Internet Archive

Americas, Conferences, Montessori method of education - History, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Based on a series of papers presented at a symposium on "Montessori in Contemporary American Culture", held in Arlington, Va., in April 1990, and sponsored by the American Montessori Society.

Language: English

Published: Portsmouth, New Hampshire: Heinemann, 1992

Article

American Montessori Society National Seminar

Publication: El Boletin [Comité Hispano Montessori], no. 16

Pages: 1-2

American Montessori Society (AMS), Americas, Comité Hispano Montessori - Periodicals, Conferences, North America, United States of America

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Language: English

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