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Article

The Montessori Model in Puebla, Mexico: How One Nonprofit Is Helping Children

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 20, no. 1

Pages: 20-25

Americas, Central America, Latin America and the Caribbean, Mexico, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: In this article, the author discusses how the JUCONI Foundation in Puebla, Mexico is helping children. (JUCONI is an acronym for "Junto con los Ninos", or "Together with the Children)." This Mexican nongovernmental organization (NGO) has been successfully working with distressed families and children in Puebla since 1989. For the JUCONI Foundation, success means breaking destructive cycles of poverty and abuse, and reintegrating children and parents into society, where it is possible for them to attain education and steady jobs. With a success rate greater than 80 percent, JUCONI has been recognized for its innovative work by such organizations as UNESCO, the World Bank, the European Union, the British government, and the International Youth Foundation. The JUCONI Foundation helps 350 children and 150 families a year. The JUCONI Day Center offers educational and therapeutic services to families and children (up to age 13) working in the markets and provides a Montessori model of education for children ages 18 months to 5 years. Children attend a child-friendly center where they engage in activities designed to foster their creativity, curiosity, and independence. Based upon the guiding principle of fostering a love of learning in children through self- and teacher-initiated experiences, the JUCONI Day Center benefited from the teachings of an experienced guide who played a key role in the implementation of the Montessori model. The Montessori model for the younger children prepares them for the challenges of public education. It is an integrated program designed to help the children realize their emotional, cognitive, social, and physical potential, so they can benefit more from the services available to them.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Supporting Sensory-Sensitive Children in a Sensory-Intensive World

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 29, no. 1

Pages: 34-39

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, Sensory disorders in children, Sensory integration dysfunction in children, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: For American children with educational challenges, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (or DSM-5) (American Psychiatric Association, 2013), is critically important because inclusion of a disorder in the DSM-5 allows for treatment and support to be paid for by the child's public school district if it interferes with his or her educational achievement. Early parent observation of sensory differences is often a child's first reported sign of autism, occurring as early as 9-12 months of age (Murray-Slutsky & Paris, 2000; Baranek, 2002). * Sensory profiles can distinguish among children with autism, children with ADHD, and children without those diagnoses (Tomchek & Dunn, 2007; Yochman, Parush, & Ornoy, 2004). * Well-developed sensory integration has strong correlation with academic achievement and cognitive processing. Early detection and management of sensory challenges can tie to predicting later academic performance deficits (Parham, 1998; Koenig & Rudney, 2010). * In a review of studies examining links between SI and ADHD, sensory-motor abilities of children with ADHD were lower than those of a control group. Other literature examines connections with disorders ranging from fragile X syndrome, mood disorders, behavioral disorders, and nonverbal learning disabilities (NVLD) to physically based conditions, such as premature birth, prenatal drug exposure, cerebral palsy/spina bifida/ Down syndrome, language delay, and other learning disabilities, as well as environmentally caused deficits, including abuse, neglect, or trauma.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Report

Ancona Montessori Research Project for Culturally Disadvantaged Children. September 1, 1968 to August 31, 1969. Final Report

Available from: ERIC

Academic achievement, Americas, Cognitive development, Comparative education, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Elementary education, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This paper, part of a long term study, reports the effect of a modified Montessori preschool experience on cognitive development, school-related behaviors, and social interactions and perceptions of disadvantaged children. Each of thirty-five disadvantaged Negro children (31 in nursery classes and 4 in elementary classes) was pair-matched with a middle class child. In the disadvantaged group, 17 children were attending nursery classes for the first time. Pre- and posttests were made of cognitive ability, on the Stanford-Binet, Piaget tests of length conservation, and sociometric features. Also, children were rated by testers on performance and by teachers rated classroom behaviors. Data from previous years on some of the children were used in reference to long term change. Part I (nursery school) test results show that neither first nor second-year children significantly increased their I.Q. scores. Both disadvantaged and middle class children scored similarly on task orientation. Middle class children showed more friendship choices forming across social-class lines. Part II (elementary school) results present limited support for the theory that children who continue in Montessori, rather than public, school will show better school achievement. Data included school records of more than 30 children. A future study will investigate diffusion effects on mothers and younger siblings, and testing with measures more directly relevant to Montessori curriculum. (NH)

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., Aug 31, 1969

Doctoral Dissertation

Evidence Based Social Skills Interventions for Young Children with Asperger’s Syndrome and the Montessori Educational Method: An Integrative Review

Available from: University of Pennsylvania Libraries

Asperger's syndrome in children, Autism in children, Children with disabilities, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, People with disabilities

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Abstract/Notes: Asperger’s Syndrome (AS) is a medically recognized disorder on the Autism Spectrum. One in 88 children age eight are diagnosed with AS (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, 2014). A key feature of AS is a deficiency in social skills. In the past ten years five main types of social skills interventions have been researched for their impact on young children with AS. Data suggest these treatments help children with AS acquire social skills. More research is needed on the types of learning environments that incorporate or lend themselves to utilizing these types of social skills interventions. One potential model, the Montessori Method of education was initially designed to teach children with significant developmental, social, and educational disabilities, with an intentional focus on individualized learning and socialization. To date, the potential overlap between empirically supported interventions to teach social skills to children with AS and the Montessori Method of education has not been researched. A comprehensive literature review was conducted to compare five researched interventions for social skill acquisition in children with AS with the Montessori Method of education. Findings suggest that of these five interventions, three bear significant resemblance to the Montessori Method of education while the other two do not. Implications and recommendations for parents, teachers, educational administrators, and social workers and other mental health practitioners who assist children with AS are provided.

Language: English

Published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 2014

Article

The 'Cosmic' Task of the Youngest Children – Direct, Anticipate or Respect? Experiences Working with Small Children

Available from: Journal of Montessori Research and Education

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research and Education, vol. 2, no. 1

Pages: 1–12

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Abstract/Notes: The article derived from Grazia Honegger Fresco’s years in close cooperation with Maria Montessori and Adele Costa Gnocchi. The author illustrates how small children from the moment they start using their hands and are standing unassisted on their own legs must act in their own way. The teacher must observe before acting and intervene as little as possible. Honegger Fresco follows the work of Montessori and Costa Gnocchi and she compares the findings with different fields of science, such as ethnology and neurology. As a result of her observations and experiences she points toward the relationship between a good childhood, and in the long term, human responsibility on Earth, using the concept “the Cosmic Task”. The method in this article is based on autoethnography, as the author shares her personal experience and reflections, both as a teacher and as an educator. The aim is to shed light on aspects regarding the needs of small children and to point at the essential role of adults, educators as well as parents. As Schiedi explains, autoethnography “extends its narrative horizon to a social, professional, organizational dimension of the self” (2016). During Honegger Fresco’s career, she was primarily inspired by Maria Montessori’s research about child development and children’s needs and rights, and she had continuously deepened her understanding by studying other researchers in this field. Thus, the article will share her conviction that by serving the creative spirit of the youngest children we will build a better future for our planet.

Language: English

DOI: 10.16993/jmre.10

ISSN: 2002-3375

Report

Ancona Montessori Research Project for Culturally Disadvantaged Children. Final Report

Available from: ERIC

Academic achievement, Americas, Cognitive development, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Elementary school students, Longitudinal studies, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Parent participation, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This is the final report of the Ancona Montessori Research Project for Culturally Disadvantaged Children begun in 1965 to investigate the effects of a modified Montessori program for disadvantaged children in the preschool and early elementary years. This report deals with the academic year 1969-1970, in which 29 disadvantaged children and a comparable group of 29 middle class children are the central focus of study. In addition, there is a followup on the school careers of disadvantaged children who attended Ancona at one time. A number of hypotheses about the potential effects of the project on the children's cognitive, social development are studied. Part I of the report deals with findings relative to the nursery school children, and includes a discussion of data from three measures of intellectual development (Stanford Binet, WPPSI and Merrill-Palmer) and from tester and teacher ratings of school-related behaviors and attitudes and social interaction. Part II details findings on the elementary school children and followup data on children who attended Ancona in previous years but are now elementary school students in other schools. In addition, data regarding children whose families have had long term involvement in the school is discussed. The appendix includes Ancona school Head Start program ratings of behavior during individual intelligence testing. (MS)

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., Aug 31, 1970

Article

The Effects of Three Different Educational Approaches on Children's Drawing Ability: Steiner, Montessori, and Traditional

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: British Journal of Educational Psychology, vol. 70, no. 4

Pages: 485-503

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Abstract/Notes: Although there is a national curriculum for art education in the UK there are also alternative approaches in the private sector. This paper addresses the issue of the effect of these approaches on children's drawing ability. Aim. To compare the drawing ability in three drawing tasks of children in Steiner, Montessori and traditional schools. Sample. The participants were 60 school children between the ages of 5;11 and 7;2. Twenty children were tested in each type of school. Method. Each child completed three drawings: a free drawing, a scene and an observational drawing. Results. As predicted, the free and scene drawings of children in the Steiner school were rated more highly than those of children in Montessori and traditional schools. Steiner children's use of colour was also rated more highly, although they did not use more colours than the other children. Steiner children used significantly more fantasy topics in their free drawings. Further observation indicated that the Steiner children were better at using the whole page and organising their drawings into a scene; their drawings were also more detailed. Contrary to previous research Montessori children did not draw more inanimate objects and geometrical shapes or fewer people than other children. Also, contrary to the prediction, Steiner children were significantly better rather than worse than other children at observational drawing. Conclusion. The results suggest that the approach to art education in Steiner schools is conducive not only to more highly rated imaginative drawings in terms of general drawing ability and use of colour but also to more accurate and detailed observational drawings.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1348/000709900158263

ISSN: 2044-8279, 0007-0998

Bachelor's Thesis

Perbedaan tingkat kemandirian anak Prasekolah di sekolah Montessori dengan sekolah non Montessori [Differences in the level of independence of preschool children in Montessori schools and non-Montessori schools]

Available from: CORE

Asia, Australasia, Comparative education, Indonesia, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Southeast Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Kemandirian adalah kemampuan seseorang untuk melakukan segala sesuatunya sendiri sesuai dengan tugas perkembangannya yang didasari oleh inisiatif, keinginan, kontrol diri dan kepercayaan pada kemampuannya sendiri. Anak perlu dilatih kemandiriannya sejak usia dini supaya tugas perkembangan dapat berkembang secara optimal. Sekolah memiliki peran penting untuk meningkatkan kemandirian anak. Menurut Santrock (2002:242), lingkungan bermain sangat penting dalam optimalisasi perkembangan anak. Salah satu sekolah dengan pendekatan seperti di atas adalah sekolah Montessori. Pendekatan Montessori menerapkan agar anak belajar mandiri dan tidak bertanya kepada guru atau menunggu jawaban (Hainstock 2008:38-40). Anak yang dididik dengan pendekatan Montessori diberi kesempatan untuk bekerja sendiri dengan material-material yang ada di lingkungannya, mengungkapkan keinginannya untuk memilih aktivitas, mengembangkan disiplin, dan anak perlu mengetahui apa yang baik dan buruk. Apabila hal-hal ini telah dipenuhi, maka kemandirian anak akan terbentuk (Modern Montessori International n.d.:40-41). Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui secara empiris ada tidaknya perbedaan tingkat kemandirian anak prasekolah di sekolah Montessori dengan sekolah non Montessori. Subjek penelitian (N=28) adalah anak prasekolah berusia 3-4 tahun yang bersekolah di sekolah Montessori “X” dan sekolah non Montessori “Y” Teknik pengambilan sampel menggunakan seluruh populasi playgroup 2. Pengambilan data menggunakan rating scale terhadap kemandirian anak di sekolah Montessori maupun di sekolah non Montessori. Data dianalisis dengan teknik Uji t (t-test). Nilai t = 0.364, dengan p = 0.720 (p > 0.05) yang berarti hipotesis penelitian ditolak. Hal ini berarti tidak ada perbedaan signifikan tingkat kemandirian anak prasekolah di sekolah Montessori “X” dengan sekolah non Montessori “Y”. [Independence is a person's ability to do things on their own in accordance with their developmental tasks based on initiative, desire, self-control and belief in their own abilities. Children need to be trained to be independent from an early age so that developmental tasks can develop optimally. Schools have an important role in increasing children's independence. According to Santrock (2002: 242), the play environment is very important in optimizing children's development. One of the schools with such an approach is the Montessori school. The Montessori approach applies so that children learn independently and do not ask the teacher or wait for answers (Hainstock 2008:38-40). Children who are educated with the Montessori approach are given the opportunity to work alone with materials in their environment, express their desire to choose activities, develop discipline, and children need to know what is good and bad. If these things have been fulfilled, then the child's independence will be formed (Modern Montessori International n.d.: 40-41). This study aims to determine empirically whether there are differences in the level of independence of preschool children in Montessori schools and non-Montessori schools. The research subjects (N=28) were preschoolers aged 3-4 years who attended Montessori schools "X" and non-Montessori schools "Y" The sampling technique used the entire playgroup population 2. Data collection used a rating scale on the independence of children in Montessori schools. as well as in non-Montessori schools. The data were analyzed by using the t-test technique (t-test). The value of t = 0.364, with p = 0.720 (p > 0.05) which means the research hypothesis is rejected. This means that there is no significant difference in the level of independence of preschool children in Montessori schools "X" with non-Montessori schools "Y"]

Language: Indonesian

Published: Surabaya, Indonesia, 2009

Article

Objectively Measured Sedentary Behavior in Preschool Children: Comparison Between Montessori and Traditional Preschools

Available from: BioMed Central

Publication: The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, vol. 10, no. 2

Pages: Article 2

Americas, Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Background This study aimed to compare the levels of objectively-measured sedentary behavior in children attending Montessori preschools with those attending traditional preschools. Methods The participants in this study were preschool children aged 4 years old who were enrolled in Montessori and traditional preschools. The preschool children wore ActiGraph accelerometers. Accelerometers were initialized using 15-second intervals and sedentary behavior was defined as <200 counts/15-second. The accelerometry data were summarized into the average minutes per hour spent in sedentary behavior during the in-school, the after-school, and the total-day period. Mixed linear regression models were used to determine differences in the average time spent in sedentary behavior between children attending traditional and Montessori preschools, after adjusting for selected potential correlates of preschoolers’ sedentary behavior. Results Children attending Montessori preschools spent less time in sedentary behavior than those attending traditional preschools during the in-school (44.4. min/hr vs. 47.1 min/hr, P = 0.03), after-school (42.8. min/hr vs. 44.7 min/hr, P = 0.04), and total-day (43.7 min/hr vs. 45.5 min/hr, P = 0. 009) periods. School type (Montessori or traditional), preschool setting (private or public), socio-demographic factors (age, gender, and socioeconomic status) were found to be significant predictors of preschoolers’ sedentary behavior. Conclusions Levels of objectively-measured sedentary behavior were significantly lower among children attending Montessori preschools compared to children attending traditional preschools. Future research should examine the specific characteristics of Montessori preschools that predict the lower levels of sedentary behavior among children attending these preschools compared to children attending traditional preschools.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1186/1479-5868-10-2

ISSN: 1479-5868

Article

Research on the Impact of the Emotional Expression of Kindergarten Teachers on Children: From the Perspective of the Class Micro-Power Relationship

Available from: Frontiers in Psychology

Publication: Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 13

Pages: Article 808847

Asia, China, East Asia, Montessori method of education - Evaluation

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Abstract/Notes: During the preschool years, the socio-emotional responses children receive from interactions with teachers are incorporated into their own social behaviors. This is one of the key ways in which children acquire social and emotional skills. Based on field studies, it can be found that this learning process is not simple imitation of children, but of a more complex context of group interaction. To further clarify the impact of kindergarten teachers’ emotion on the sociometric status and behavior of 3–5 year-old children in their classes, the researchers chose a Montessori mixed-age kindergarten in Beijing as the field site and observed five classes within the kindergarten over a 2-month period in this ethnographic case study. The study found that the power gap between teacher and pupil spreads rapidly to all children in the classroom as a result of the teacher’s emotions, and even stimulates power stratification within the children. In addition, there are differences in the social behaviors between the children of different levels of power. As preschool children are in a critical developmental window when social knowledge is being accumulated and social skills are being acquired, using power relations within the kindergarten classroom as an entry point to analyze the impact of teachers’ emotions on children’s social behavior provides a new breakthrough for the professional development of early childhood education and the better achievement of educational goals.

Language: English

DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2022.808847

ISSN: 1664-1078

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