Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

507 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Effects of Three Different Educational Approaches on Children's Drawing Ability: Steiner, Montessori, and Traditional

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: British Journal of Educational Psychology, vol. 70, no. 4

Pages: 485-503

See More

Abstract/Notes: Although there is a national curriculum for art education in the UK there are also alternative approaches in the private sector. This paper addresses the issue of the effect of these approaches on children's drawing ability. Aim. To compare the drawing ability in three drawing tasks of children in Steiner, Montessori and traditional schools. Sample. The participants were 60 school children between the ages of 5;11 and 7;2. Twenty children were tested in each type of school. Method. Each child completed three drawings: a free drawing, a scene and an observational drawing. Results. As predicted, the free and scene drawings of children in the Steiner school were rated more highly than those of children in Montessori and traditional schools. Steiner children's use of colour was also rated more highly, although they did not use more colours than the other children. Steiner children used significantly more fantasy topics in their free drawings. Further observation indicated that the Steiner children were better at using the whole page and organising their drawings into a scene; their drawings were also more detailed. Contrary to previous research Montessori children did not draw more inanimate objects and geometrical shapes or fewer people than other children. Also, contrary to the prediction, Steiner children were significantly better rather than worse than other children at observational drawing. Conclusion. The results suggest that the approach to art education in Steiner schools is conducive not only to more highly rated imaginative drawings in terms of general drawing ability and use of colour but also to more accurate and detailed observational drawings.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1348/000709900158263

ISSN: 2044-8279, 0007-0998

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Research on the Impact of the Emotional Expression of Kindergarten Teachers on Children: From the Perspective of the Class Micro-Power Relationship

Available from: Frontiers in Psychology

Publication: Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 13

Pages: Article 808847

Asia, China, East Asia, Montessori method of education - Evaluation

See More

Abstract/Notes: During the preschool years, the socio-emotional responses children receive from interactions with teachers are incorporated into their own social behaviors. This is one of the key ways in which children acquire social and emotional skills. Based on field studies, it can be found that this learning process is not simple imitation of children, but of a more complex context of group interaction. To further clarify the impact of kindergarten teachers’ emotion on the sociometric status and behavior of 3–5 year-old children in their classes, the researchers chose a Montessori mixed-age kindergarten in Beijing as the field site and observed five classes within the kindergarten over a 2-month period in this ethnographic case study. The study found that the power gap between teacher and pupil spreads rapidly to all children in the classroom as a result of the teacher’s emotions, and even stimulates power stratification within the children. In addition, there are differences in the social behaviors between the children of different levels of power. As preschool children are in a critical developmental window when social knowledge is being accumulated and social skills are being acquired, using power relations within the kindergarten classroom as an entry point to analyze the impact of teachers’ emotions on children’s social behavior provides a new breakthrough for the professional development of early childhood education and the better achievement of educational goals.

Language: English

DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2022.808847

ISSN: 1664-1078

Article

Guiding Children 'Back from the Edge' Preparing an Environment to Support Children at Risk

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 42, no. 2

Pages: 169-190

⛔ No DOI found

See More

Abstract/Notes: "The children who demand more attention than others, who are disruptive, unmotivated, oppositional, aggressive, or do not give us the positive feedback we get from others…This is where we dig in and find compassion, and understanding, and the knowledge that no child wants to be disruptive, oppositional, or aggressive. They do this because they are hurt, and we are here to help." Sarah Werner Andrews provides an approach to the children who pose a challenge because they themselves are facing challenges. She offers practical tools and approaches that are first based on positive relationships, then on the relationship with the environment, and finally on positive, collaborative interventions. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Children on the Edge: Creating a Path for Happy, Healthy Development," January 12-15, 2017 in New Orleans, LA.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Mengte suo li jiaoxue fa dui xueling qian naotan ertong ren zhi de yingxiang / 蒙特梭利教学法对学龄前脑瘫儿童认知的影响 [Effect of Montessori Teaching Method on Cognition of Preschool Children with Cerebral Palsy]

Publication: Zhongguo Fuyou Jiankang Yanjiu / 中国妇幼健康研究 [Chinese Journal of Maternal and Child Health Research], vol. 29, no. 6

Pages: 685-690

See More

Abstract/Notes: Objective To explore the application effect of Montessori teaching method on cognitive training of children with cerebral palsy (CP) .Methods A total of 116 children with CP aged 30 - 36 months old who were admitted to the department of children healthcare and rehabilitation in Xianyang Caihong Hospital during July 2013 to July 2016 were selected and divided into two groups randomly .The children in control group (n = 57) were given conventional cognitive teaching ,while the children in intervention group (n = 59) adopted the Montessori teaching method to carry out cognitive teaching .The teaching lasted for 12 months ,and each assessment was conducted ,recorded and analyzed statistically at the 6th ,9th ,and 12th month respectively .Results After training for 9 and 12 months ,the completion rate of the children in color matching test in the intervention group was better than that in the control group (χ2 value was 5 .098 and 5 .954 ,respectively ,both P < 0 .05) .After training for 6 months ,in 4 items such as color matching ,item matching ,color expression ,and shape expression ,the speed of children in the intervention group was higher than that in the control group (t value was 2 .041 ,3 .037 ,2 .155 and 2 .468 ,respectively ,all P < 0 .05) .After training for 9 months ,the matching speed and expression attention speed of 3 dimensions including color ,shape and item of children in the intervention group were all higher than those in the control group (t value was 2 .856 ,3 .454 ,5 .509 ,5 .837 ,8 .424 and 4 .923 , respectively ,all P < 0 .05) .After training for 12 months ,the matching speed and expression attention speed of the 3 dimensions including color ,shape and item of children in the intervention group were all higher than those in the control group (t value was 2 .888 ,3 .273 ,6 .672 ,6 .672 ,3 .567 and 4 .290 ,respectively ,all P < 0 .05) .For the errors number in the color matching test after training for 9 and 12 months ,and the errors number in the color expression test after training for 12 month ,the children in the intervention group were less than those in the control group (t value was 2 .713 ,2 .846 and 2 .467 ,respectively ,all P < 0 .05) . Conclusion The Montessori teaching method can promote the cognitive development of children with CP .

Language: Chinese

ISSN: 1673-5293

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Interaction of Children with and without Communication Disorders Using Montessori Activities for the Tablet

Available from: SpringerLink

Publication: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, vol. 25

Pages: 495-507

Children with disabilities, Communicative disorders in children, Inclusive education, Montessori method of education, Montessori method of education, People with disabilities

See More

Abstract/Notes: Mobile technologies used for education may offer advantages for children with Communication Disorders, among which we can find language disorders and speech disorders, which are identified in DSM-V. In this research, we have introduced two educational activities, “Matching Cards” and “Cards & Sounds”, based on the Montessori Method and which deal with the first stages of reading and writing. We have tested these two activities with children with and without Communication Disorders in order to study how they interact. These groups of children use a Tablet to perform the two activities, which vary in visual and auditory stimuli. The activities employ two touch interactions: tap and drag & drop. Based on Montessori, the activity and the interaction do not produce either positive or negative feedback. The analysis performed with the variables of time, interaction and mistake has shown that children from both groups change their efficiency of use. Differences regarding the interaction of children with and without Communication Disorders have also been observed. Additionally, children with Communication Disorders need additional strategies as explicit indicators in the interaction which may be a guide to be able to carry out specific actions.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s00779-020-01471-7

ISSN: 1617-4909, 1617-4917

Doctoral Dissertation

A Comparison of Traditional vs. Montessori Education in Relation to Children's Self-Esteem, Self-Efficacy, and Prosocial Behavior

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Academic achievement, Americas, Caribbean, Comparative education, Elementary education, Latin America and the Caribbean, Montessori schools, Puerto Rico, Student attitudes

See More

Abstract/Notes: The present study compares elementary school children from Traditional and Montessori programs. The purpose is to investigate how different educational philosophies and teaching methods affect perceived levels of self-esteem, self-efficacy, prosocial behavior and aggressive behavior in children. The participants in this study consisted of second through sixth grade students who were attending Montessori and Traditional schools since the age of five, or earlier. All children completed the Washington Self-Description Questionnaire (WSDQ), three subscales of the Children's Multi-dimensional Self-Efficacy Scales (i.e., academic achievement, self-regulated learning, & social), the Physical and Verbal Aggression Scale, and the Prosocial Behavior Scale. No significant differences were revealed between the Montessori and Traditional programs in relation to the children's perceived levels of self-esteem, self-efficacy for academic achievement, self-efficacy for self-regulated learning, social self-efficacy, or prosocial behavior. However, the Montessori children reported significantly lower levels of physical/verbal aggression than the Traditional children. Moreover, as Montessori children develop a heightened ability to work within a group of peers, they seem to develop lower levels of physical/verbal aggression, which was not found among Traditional children. Furthermore, Montessori children's perceived ability to make and keep friends of the same gender was found to significantly improve with increased years in the program, which was not found in the Traditional method. For Montessori children, their perceived ability to work together in a group was found to be positively associated with heightened levels of self-efficacy for academic achievement and self-efficacy for self-regulated learning. Furthermore, the Montessori children's levels of self-esteem were correlated significantly with their perceived levels of self-efficacy for academic achievement and self-efficacy for self-regulated learning. Although Traditional children were also found to gain self-efficacy for self-regulated learning through working together at young ages, as they proceed to higher grade levels, their self-efficacy for self-regulated learning decreased.

Language: English

Published: San Juan, Puerto Rico, 2002

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Effectiveness of Montessori Sensorial Training Program for Children with Mild Intellectual Disabilities in Pakistan: A Randomized Control Trial

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: International Journal of Disability, Development and Education

Pages: 1-11

Asia, Children with disabilities, Developmentally disabled children, Pakistan, Sensorial education, Sensorial materials, South Asia

See More

Abstract/Notes: Intellectual disability is a serious lifelong disability that places heavy demands on society and the health system. The study was designed to determine the extent to which the intellectually challenged children are capable of improving their cognitive abilities as well as adaptive functioning through the Montessori Sensorial Training program when introduced in a different setting (i.e. special education school system). With randomised control trial (RCT) of pre-and post-testing, 30 children with mild intellectual disabilities were randomly allocated to Montessori Sensorial Training intervention condition (n = 15) and waitlist control condition (n = 15). The intervention group showed significant improvement in cognitive abilities (i.e. classification, seriation, recognition, ordination, and visual and auditory discrimination) as compared to the control group at post-assessment. Children who received training also showed improvement in communication and self-care domain as compared to the control group. This study provides evidence that Montessori Sensorial Training is not only effective for children going to mainstream schools but also for children with intellectual disabilities. Despite some limitations, the results of the study are encouraging and suggesting that Montessori Sensorial Training is an effective intervention to facilitate self-based learning, independence, and decision-making skills in children with mild intellectual disabilities.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/1034912X.2021.2016657

ISSN: 1034-912X

Article

Spaces for Children: Listing to Young Children about Their Early Childhood Environments

Publication: Montessori International, vol. 84

Pages: 16–17

See More

Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

Bachelor's Thesis

Testování jemné motoriky dětí ve věku 3-6 let navštěvujících Montessori předškolní zařízení testovou baterií MABC-2 / Fine Motor Skills Testing of Children in the Preschool Age Visiting Montessori Kindergarten by the battery test MABC-2

Available from: Univerzita Karlova Institutional Repository

See More

Abstract/Notes: Cíl: V rámci bakalářské práce bylo provedeno měření jemné motoriky u dětí předškolního věku pravidelně navštěvujících Montessori mateřskou školu. Cílem měření bylo posoudit, zdali jsou výsledné hodnoty dětí z Montessori MŠ (mateřská škola) lepší v porovnání s hodnotami dětí, které pravidelně docházejí do běžné mateřské školy. Metodika: Ke sběru dat byla aplikována testová baterie MABC-2. Pro účely výzkumného šetření byla dále použita data z měření jemné motoriky u výběru dětí z pražského komplexu běžných MŠ (autorem dosud nepublikovaného výzkumu je Mgr. Jakub Kokštejn, Ph.D.) a data, která ve své práci uvádí Mgr. Ludvík Valtr. Nejdříve proběhlo porovnání výsledků dětí z Montessori MŠ s hodnotami pražských dětí a poté komparace výsledků zjištěných v Montessori MŠ a hodnot dětí uvedených v diplomové práci Mgr. Ludvíka Valtra. Výsledky a diskuze: V rámci obou porovnání byl patrný statisticky významný rozdíl pouze v motorické dovednosti číslo 1, kdy u prvního zmíněného vzorku vykazovaly ukazatele úrovně jemné motoriky lepší hodnoty u souboru dětí z běžné MŠ a u druhého byla naopak patrná dovednostní převaha dětí z Montessori MŠ. Z výsledků tedy jednoznačně nevyplývá potvrzení ani vyvrácení hypotézy, která předpokládala dosažení jasně lepších výsledků dětmi z Montessori MŠ. / The Aim of the Thesis: We will measure fine motor skills of children in preschool age visiting Montessori kindergarten. We will compare measured results with children who visit common kindergartens. Method: We used battery test MABC-2 for measuring. We also used data from measuring fine motor skills among children from selection of kindergartens in Prague. This research is done by Mgr. Jakub Kokštejn, Ph.D. and has not been publishet yet. We also used data presented by Mr. Ludvík Valtr. We compared results between children from the Montessori kindergarten and children visiting prague kindergartens- sample one. Then we compared our results with results from the Diploma thesis by Mr. Ludvík Valtr- sample two. Results and Discussion: We found statistically significant result only in measuring of motor skill number one. In first mentioned sample we found better results between children from common kindergartens. In second mentioned sample we found better results between children from the Montessori kindergarten. We can not confirm or disprove the hypothesis where we expected significantly better results between children visiting Montessori kindergarten.

Language: Czech

Published: Prague, Czechia, 2015

Article

Mrs. Ernest Thomson-Seton at Opening of Montessori School for New York Tenement Children

Available from: ProQuest Historical Newspapers

Publication: The Evening Record (Windsor, Ontario, Canada)

Pages: 8

See More

Abstract/Notes: "To prove that the Montessori system of education is both practical and available for the poor children of the tenements as well as for those who have every advantage that can be had for money, is the purpose of the Montessori Educational Association, which has just established a school for poor children in the upper East Side in one of the most thronged of the tenement sections of New York. The Montessori idea of education is diametrically opposed to the system in vogue. All the time commonly spent in training children to be passive is in the Montessori schools spent in awakening activity and encouraging initiative. Dr. Montessori, the founder of the new system of education, says that one of the most important tasks of the teacher lies in 'seeing that the child does not confound the idea of good with immobility, and evil with activity.' Instead of devoting months of arduous labor drilling the alphabet and elements of reading and writing into the heads of the little children, Montessori methods develop the various senses which give them control of the apparatur through which they must get all their knowledge of the world. One of the most remarkable things notied by the observers of the new school was the spontaneity with which the children learned to write. From tracing sand-paper letters and building of words by the aid of blocks, many of the children took up bits of chalk and began to write, not a few, but many words. The children learn to observe, to reason and to use their senses rather than clog their memoriy with useless rules. The school furnishes the little tots with luncheon, but even in this they are stimulated to activity. They have little waitresses who learn to move about freely and gracefully, to carry things without breaking them, and to avoid clumsiness and awkwardness. When the meal is over the children will all go into their small kitchen, roll up their sleeves and wash the dishes from which they had been eating. The picture shows Mrs. Ernest Thompson-Seton, the wife of Ernest Thompson-Seton, the Canadian author and naturalist, who is one of the trustees of the Montessori Educational Association, telling a little waitress to pose for the picture."

Language: English

Advanced Search