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382 results

Article

Why Is Montessori Relevant for the 1980's?

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 3, no. 5

Pages: 2

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Language: English

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Theoretical Perspectives and Empirical Evidence Relevant to Classroom Instruction with Manipulatives

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: Educational Psychology Review, vol. 26, no. 1

Pages: 1-7

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Abstract/Notes: The papers in this special issue focus on instructional strategies with manipulatives. Often described as “hands-on learning”, these strategies emphasize the use of physical and, more recently, virtual objects to represent target information and concepts. These strategies are frequently suggested as effective techniques for teaching across many domains of learning. This special issue presents contemporary theoretical perspectives and empirical evidence, regarding instructional manipulatives with a focus on application in classroom contexts. In this introduction, we present the primary topics of interest to the special issue and provide broad overviews of the contributors’ papers.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s10648-014-9257-3

ISSN: 1040-726X, 1573-336X

Article

Computers: Relevant Issues for Montessorians

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: The Constructive Triangle (1974-1989), vol. 9, no. 4

Pages: 4–6

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Language: English

ISSN: 0010-700X

Master's Thesis

Culturally Responsive Teaching Within a Montessori Learning Environment

Available from: Hamline University – Digital Commons

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Abstract/Notes: In 1954 the Supreme Court, in Brown vs. the Topeka Board of Education , ruled that the legal segregation of schools based on race was unconstitutional. Sixty-six years later there still exists an academic achievement gap between white students and students of color. Given that this gap exists in Montessori schools with high standardized test scores, this capstone project examines how the use of Culturally Responsive Teaching in a Montessori Learning environment may help eliminate the academic achievement gap ? This capstone reviews literature pertaining to the role culture plays in education and the alignment of Culturally Responsive Teaching with Montessori teaching practices and philosophy. The information in the capstone was presented at three professional development sessions which consisted of a slideshow and a teacher toolkit. The goal of the project was to motivate Montessori teachers to incorporate the ideas of Culturally Responsive Teaching into their lessons, thereby giving all students the opportunity to see their cultures reflected throughout the school.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2020

Book Section

Montessori with the Culturally Disadvantaged: A Cognitive-Developmental Interpretation of Some Research Findings

Book Title: Montessori Schools in America: Historical, Philosophical, and Empirical Research Perspectives

Pages: 169-180

African American community, Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This article was originally published as an entry in Early Education, eds. R. D. Hess and R. M. Bear (Chicago: Aldine, 1968), p. 105-118.

Language: English

Published: Lexington, Massachusetts: Ginn Custom Pub., 1983

Edition: 2nd ed.

ISBN: 0-536-04367-1

Book Section

Montessori with the Culturally Disadvantaged: A Cognitive-Developmental Interpretation of Some Research Findings

Book Title: Montessori Schools in America: Historical, Philosophical, and Empirical Research Perspectives

Pages: 153-162

African American community, Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This article was originally published as an entry in Early Education, eds. R. D. Hess and R. M. Bear (Chicago: Aldine, 1968), p. 105-118.

Language: English

Published: Lexington, Massachusetts: Ginn Custom Pub., 1981

Edition: 1st ed.

ISBN: 0-536-03647-0

Article

Early Education for the Culturally Disadvantaged: A Pictorial Essay

Publication: American Montessori Society Bulletin, vol. 3, no. 4

Pages: 1-8

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Language: English

ISSN: 0277-9064

Master's Thesis (M.A. In Education)

How Montessori Educators in the US Address Culturally Responsive Teaching

Available from: American Montessori Society

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to investigate how Montessori educators in a public school setting in California address the pluralistic nature of their students’ cultural, racial and linguistic backgrounds. The Montessori method of education has been an alternative approach to education used around the world for 100 years. In the U.S., teachers’ backgrounds are often culturally and linguistically different from those of their students. How aware of these differences are Montessori teachers as they use the materials, curriculum, and method of the Montessori approach to education? The participants were six Montessori elementary teachers from the same public school, including the researcher. The participants met weekly for one hour focus group meetings which were audio recorded and transcribed by the researcher. Other data included researcher’s field notes in the form of reflections written after focus group meetings. Data was analyzed for generative themes and are presented here framed in theory from the literature on critical pedagogy and the Montessori method of education.

Language: English

Published: San Francisco, California, 2007

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Effects of a Culturally Adapted Group-Based Montessori-Based Activities on Engagement and Affect in Chinese Older People with Dementia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: BMC Geriatrics, vol. 21, no. 1

Pages: Article 24

Alzheimer's disease, Asia, China, Dementia, East Asia, Gerontology, Montessori method of education, Montessori therapy, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming (MBDP), Montessori-based interventions (MBI)

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Abstract/Notes: The Montessori Method underpinned by the principle of person-centered care has been widely adopted to design activities for people with dementia. However, the methodological quality of the existing evidence is fair. The objectives of this study are to examine the feasibility and effects of a culturally adapted group-based Montessori Method for Dementia program in Chinese community on engagement and affect in community-dwelling people with dementia.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1186/s12877-020-01967-0

ISSN: 1471-2318

Report

Report of a Research and Demonstration Project for Culturally Disadvantaged Children in the Ancona Montessori School

Available from: ERIC

Academic achievement, Classroom environments, Early childhood education

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Abstract/Notes: A preschool experience was provided for lower-income negro children, and then their gains or losses in IQ and social integration were evaluated in terms of the type of the teaching method used. Thirty lower-income negro children and 17 middle-income negro and white children were separated into three groups and exposed to three teaching methods. Class one was unintegrated (all lower-income negro children) and non-Montessorial in methodology. It was the most unrestricted in terms of teacher control. Class two as integrated and non-Montessorial, but teacher control and restriction was more evident. Class three was integrated and Montessorial. The pupils here were the most disciplined and controlled. A thorough study was made of these classroom procedures, teaching techniques, and pupil activities. The results of the Stanford Binet intelligence tests showed no significant iq gain among the groups or within a group from test one at the beginning of the eight-week summer session to test two at the end of the session. But individual gains appeared. These were found to be an inverse function of distractibility. A winter pre-school session, with new pupils and using only the Montessori method, resulted in IQ gains. This was attributed to an improved classroom atmosphere. In general, the sessions did increase the children's readiness to begin school work and helped them to gain social confidence. Encouraging parental interest and participation was a collateral aspect of the programs. (WD)

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., 1966

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