Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

512 results

Bachelor's Thesis

Perbedaan tingkat kemandirian anak Prasekolah di sekolah Montessori dengan sekolah non Montessori [Differences in the level of independence of preschool children in Montessori schools and non-Montessori schools]

Available from: CORE

Asia, Australasia, Comparative education, Indonesia, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Southeast Asia

See More

Abstract/Notes: Kemandirian adalah kemampuan seseorang untuk melakukan segala sesuatunya sendiri sesuai dengan tugas perkembangannya yang didasari oleh inisiatif, keinginan, kontrol diri dan kepercayaan pada kemampuannya sendiri. Anak perlu dilatih kemandiriannya sejak usia dini supaya tugas perkembangan dapat berkembang secara optimal. Sekolah memiliki peran penting untuk meningkatkan kemandirian anak. Menurut Santrock (2002:242), lingkungan bermain sangat penting dalam optimalisasi perkembangan anak. Salah satu sekolah dengan pendekatan seperti di atas adalah sekolah Montessori. Pendekatan Montessori menerapkan agar anak belajar mandiri dan tidak bertanya kepada guru atau menunggu jawaban (Hainstock 2008:38-40). Anak yang dididik dengan pendekatan Montessori diberi kesempatan untuk bekerja sendiri dengan material-material yang ada di lingkungannya, mengungkapkan keinginannya untuk memilih aktivitas, mengembangkan disiplin, dan anak perlu mengetahui apa yang baik dan buruk. Apabila hal-hal ini telah dipenuhi, maka kemandirian anak akan terbentuk (Modern Montessori International n.d.:40-41). Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui secara empiris ada tidaknya perbedaan tingkat kemandirian anak prasekolah di sekolah Montessori dengan sekolah non Montessori. Subjek penelitian (N=28) adalah anak prasekolah berusia 3-4 tahun yang bersekolah di sekolah Montessori “X” dan sekolah non Montessori “Y” Teknik pengambilan sampel menggunakan seluruh populasi playgroup 2. Pengambilan data menggunakan rating scale terhadap kemandirian anak di sekolah Montessori maupun di sekolah non Montessori. Data dianalisis dengan teknik Uji t (t-test). Nilai t = 0.364, dengan p = 0.720 (p > 0.05) yang berarti hipotesis penelitian ditolak. Hal ini berarti tidak ada perbedaan signifikan tingkat kemandirian anak prasekolah di sekolah Montessori “X” dengan sekolah non Montessori “Y”. [Independence is a person's ability to do things on their own in accordance with their developmental tasks based on initiative, desire, self-control and belief in their own abilities. Children need to be trained to be independent from an early age so that developmental tasks can develop optimally. Schools have an important role in increasing children's independence. According to Santrock (2002: 242), the play environment is very important in optimizing children's development. One of the schools with such an approach is the Montessori school. The Montessori approach applies so that children learn independently and do not ask the teacher or wait for answers (Hainstock 2008:38-40). Children who are educated with the Montessori approach are given the opportunity to work alone with materials in their environment, express their desire to choose activities, develop discipline, and children need to know what is good and bad. If these things have been fulfilled, then the child's independence will be formed (Modern Montessori International n.d.: 40-41). This study aims to determine empirically whether there are differences in the level of independence of preschool children in Montessori schools and non-Montessori schools. The research subjects (N=28) were preschoolers aged 3-4 years who attended Montessori schools "X" and non-Montessori schools "Y" The sampling technique used the entire playgroup population 2. Data collection used a rating scale on the independence of children in Montessori schools. as well as in non-Montessori schools. The data were analyzed by using the t-test technique (t-test). The value of t = 0.364, with p = 0.720 (p > 0.05) which means the research hypothesis is rejected. This means that there is no significant difference in the level of independence of preschool children in Montessori schools "X" with non-Montessori schools "Y"]

Language: Indonesian

Published: Surabaya, Indonesia, 2009

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Montessori Public School Pre-K Programs and the School Readiness of Low-Income Black and Latino Children

Available from: APA PsycNet

Publication: Journal of Educational Psychology, vol. 106, no. 4

Pages: 1066-1079

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Latin American community, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Public Montessori, United States of America

See More

Abstract/Notes: Within the United States, there are a variety of early education models and curricula aimed at promoting young children's pre-academic, social, and behavioral skills. This study, using data from the Miami School Readiness Project (Winsler et al., 2008, 2012), examined the school readiness gains of low-income Latino (n = 7,045) and Black (n = 6,700) children enrolled in 2 different types of Title-1 public school pre-K programs: those in programs using the Montessori curriculum and those in more conventional programs using the High/Scope curriculum with a literacy supplement. Parents and teachers reported on children's socio-emotional and behavioral skills with the Devereux Early Childhood Assessment (Lebuffe & Naglieri, 1999), whereas children's pre-academic skills (cognitive, motor, and language) were assessed directly with the Learning Accomplishment Profile-Diagnostic (Nehring, Nehring, Bruni, & Randolph, 1992) at the beginning and end of their 4-year-old pre-K year. All children, regardless of curriculum, demonstrated gains across pre-academic, socio-emotional, and behavioral skills throughout the pre-K year; however, all children did not benefit equally from Montessori programs. Latino children in Montessori programs began the year at most risk in pre-academic and behavioral skills, yet exhibited the greatest gains across these domains and ended the year scoring above national averages. Conversely, Black children exhibited healthy gains in Montessori, but they demonstrated slightly greater gains when attending more conventional pre-K programs. Findings have implications for tailoring early childhood education programs for Latino and Black children from low-income communities.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1037/a0036799

ISSN: 0022-0663, 1939-2176

Article

Spaces for Children: Listing to Young Children about Their Early Childhood Environments

Publication: Montessori International, vol. 84

Pages: 16–17

See More

Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Effect of Montessori And Traditional Methods of Education on Emotional Intelligence of Children

Available from: European Journal of Education Studies

Publication: European Journal of Education Studies, vol. 3, no. 4

Pages: 367-382

Asia, India, South Asia

See More

Abstract/Notes: The Montessori Method of education is becoming more popular in Indian cities in the recent decades. The parents, educationists and policy makers are keenly interested in the overall development of their children or stakeholders. Since its inception, the Montessori Method of education is adopting several procedures based on its basic principles of cognitive, social and emotional development of the children. Although every principle of Montessori education is not followed in the Indian Montessori schools, the schools are adhering to several of them. The present article adopted comparative analyses to determine the effect of Montessori and traditional method of education on emotional intelligence of the school children. A total sample of 1082 children between the age group of 12 – 16 years was selected from the schools of Montessori and traditional education. The data were collected using the Bar-on, (1997, 2000) Emotional Intelligence scale with Likert response patterns ranging 1 to 5. The obtained data was subjected to ‘t’ test analysis and it was evident in the result findings that the children of Montessori method of education has significantly higher emotional intelligence than the children of traditional method on the total and as well on all dimensions of emotional intelligence. This highlights the education intervention method having strong bearing on emotional development of the children. Further, the findings related to gender effect provides inconclusive results both with Montessori and traditional children.

Language: English

DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.399050

ISSN: 2501-1111

Book Section

Written Language: The Old Methods of Teaching Reading and Writing; My First Experiments with Defective Children; First Experiments with Normal Children

Book Title: The Discovery of the Child

Pages: 199-216

Maria Montessori - Writings

See More

Abstract/Notes: Formerly entitled The Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in the Children's Houses. This book was first published in 1909 under the title 'Il Metodo della Pedagogia Scientifica Applicato all'Educazione Infantile nelle Case dei Bambini' ('The Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in the Children's Houses) and was revised in 1913, 1926, and 1935. Maria Montessori revised and reissued this book in 1948 and renamed it 'La Scoperta del Bambino'. This edition is based on the 6th Italian edition of 'La Scoperta del Bambino' published by the Italian publisher Garzanti, Milan, Italy in 1962. M. J. Costelloe, S. J. translated this Italian version into the English language in 1967 for Fides Publishers, Inc. In 2016 Fred Kelpin edited this version and added many footnotes. He incorporated new illustrations based on AMI-blueprints of the materials currently in use.

Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company, 2017

ISBN: 978-90-79506-38-5

Series: The Montessori Series , 2

Bachelor's Thesis

Testování jemné motoriky dětí ve věku 3-6 let navštěvujících Montessori předškolní zařízení testovou baterií MABC-2 / Fine Motor Skills Testing of Children in the Preschool Age Visiting Montessori Kindergarten by the battery test MABC-2

Available from: Univerzita Karlova Institutional Repository

See More

Abstract/Notes: Cíl: V rámci bakalářské práce bylo provedeno měření jemné motoriky u dětí předškolního věku pravidelně navštěvujících Montessori mateřskou školu. Cílem měření bylo posoudit, zdali jsou výsledné hodnoty dětí z Montessori MŠ (mateřská škola) lepší v porovnání s hodnotami dětí, které pravidelně docházejí do běžné mateřské školy. Metodika: Ke sběru dat byla aplikována testová baterie MABC-2. Pro účely výzkumného šetření byla dále použita data z měření jemné motoriky u výběru dětí z pražského komplexu běžných MŠ (autorem dosud nepublikovaného výzkumu je Mgr. Jakub Kokštejn, Ph.D.) a data, která ve své práci uvádí Mgr. Ludvík Valtr. Nejdříve proběhlo porovnání výsledků dětí z Montessori MŠ s hodnotami pražských dětí a poté komparace výsledků zjištěných v Montessori MŠ a hodnot dětí uvedených v diplomové práci Mgr. Ludvíka Valtra. Výsledky a diskuze: V rámci obou porovnání byl patrný statisticky významný rozdíl pouze v motorické dovednosti číslo 1, kdy u prvního zmíněného vzorku vykazovaly ukazatele úrovně jemné motoriky lepší hodnoty u souboru dětí z běžné MŠ a u druhého byla naopak patrná dovednostní převaha dětí z Montessori MŠ. Z výsledků tedy jednoznačně nevyplývá potvrzení ani vyvrácení hypotézy, která předpokládala dosažení jasně lepších výsledků dětmi z Montessori MŠ. / The Aim of the Thesis: We will measure fine motor skills of children in preschool age visiting Montessori kindergarten. We will compare measured results with children who visit common kindergartens. Method: We used battery test MABC-2 for measuring. We also used data from measuring fine motor skills among children from selection of kindergartens in Prague. This research is done by Mgr. Jakub Kokštejn, Ph.D. and has not been publishet yet. We also used data presented by Mr. Ludvík Valtr. We compared results between children from the Montessori kindergarten and children visiting prague kindergartens- sample one. Then we compared our results with results from the Diploma thesis by Mr. Ludvík Valtr- sample two. Results and Discussion: We found statistically significant result only in measuring of motor skill number one. In first mentioned sample we found better results between children from common kindergartens. In second mentioned sample we found better results between children from the Montessori kindergarten. We can not confirm or disprove the hypothesis where we expected significantly better results between children visiting Montessori kindergarten.

Language: Czech

Published: Prague, Czechia, 2015

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Interaction of Children with and without Communication Disorders Using Montessori Activities for the Tablet

Available from: SpringerLink

Publication: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, vol. 25

Pages: 495-507

Children with disabilities, Communicative disorders in children, Inclusive education, Montessori method of education, Montessori method of education, People with disabilities

See More

Abstract/Notes: Mobile technologies used for education may offer advantages for children with Communication Disorders, among which we can find language disorders and speech disorders, which are identified in DSM-V. In this research, we have introduced two educational activities, “Matching Cards” and “Cards & Sounds”, based on the Montessori Method and which deal with the first stages of reading and writing. We have tested these two activities with children with and without Communication Disorders in order to study how they interact. These groups of children use a Tablet to perform the two activities, which vary in visual and auditory stimuli. The activities employ two touch interactions: tap and drag & drop. Based on Montessori, the activity and the interaction do not produce either positive or negative feedback. The analysis performed with the variables of time, interaction and mistake has shown that children from both groups change their efficiency of use. Differences regarding the interaction of children with and without Communication Disorders have also been observed. Additionally, children with Communication Disorders need additional strategies as explicit indicators in the interaction which may be a guide to be able to carry out specific actions.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s00779-020-01471-7

ISSN: 1617-4909, 1617-4917

Article

Mrs. Ernest Thomson-Seton at Opening of Montessori School for New York Tenement Children

Available from: ProQuest Historical Newspapers

Publication: The Evening Record (Windsor, Ontario, Canada)

Pages: 8

See More

Abstract/Notes: "To prove that the Montessori system of education is both practical and available for the poor children of the tenements as well as for those who have every advantage that can be had for money, is the purpose of the Montessori Educational Association, which has just established a school for poor children in the upper East Side in one of the most thronged of the tenement sections of New York. The Montessori idea of education is diametrically opposed to the system in vogue. All the time commonly spent in training children to be passive is in the Montessori schools spent in awakening activity and encouraging initiative. Dr. Montessori, the founder of the new system of education, says that one of the most important tasks of the teacher lies in 'seeing that the child does not confound the idea of good with immobility, and evil with activity.' Instead of devoting months of arduous labor drilling the alphabet and elements of reading and writing into the heads of the little children, Montessori methods develop the various senses which give them control of the apparatur through which they must get all their knowledge of the world. One of the most remarkable things notied by the observers of the new school was the spontaneity with which the children learned to write. From tracing sand-paper letters and building of words by the aid of blocks, many of the children took up bits of chalk and began to write, not a few, but many words. The children learn to observe, to reason and to use their senses rather than clog their memoriy with useless rules. The school furnishes the little tots with luncheon, but even in this they are stimulated to activity. They have little waitresses who learn to move about freely and gracefully, to carry things without breaking them, and to avoid clumsiness and awkwardness. When the meal is over the children will all go into their small kitchen, roll up their sleeves and wash the dishes from which they had been eating. The picture shows Mrs. Ernest Thompson-Seton, the wife of Ernest Thompson-Seton, the Canadian author and naturalist, who is one of the trustees of the Montessori Educational Association, telling a little waitress to pose for the picture."

Language: English

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Colour Preference Among Children in a Nigerian Montessori School

Available from: Mediterranean Center of Social and Educational Research (MCSER)

Publication: Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences, vol. 5, no. 1

Pages: 325-332

Africa, Montessori schools, Nigeria, West Africa, West Africa

See More

Abstract/Notes: Colour preference among children has been explored in a variety of populations and cultures. However, there is scanty research on the psychology of colour and, in particular, colour preference among children in Nigeria. Sixty (60) children (30 males and 30 females) randomly drawn from a population of students of a Montessori School in Ibadan, Nigeria participated in the study. A One-Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) for Repeated Measures Design was used to test five hypotheses stated in the study. Results identified the order of colour preference by the children as red, yellow, tint, white, green, blue, brown and black. Red and yellow were significantly preferred to black. There was significant difference in order of colour among female children, children of age group 9-12 years and children of age group 3-8 years. In conclusion, red and yellow prove to be more stimulating and attractive than any other colour. These findings will be helpful to teaching agencies, and advertising companies and entrepreneurs that major in the production of children materials to know the right colour to use on their products. DOI: 10.5901/mjss.2014.v5n1p325

Language: English

DOI: 10.5901/mjss.2014.v5n1p325

ISSN: 2039-2117

Article

Supporting Sensory-Sensitive Children in a Sensory-Intensive World

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 29, no. 1

Pages: 34-39

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, Sensory disorders in children, Sensory integration dysfunction in children, ⛔ No DOI found

See More

Abstract/Notes: For American children with educational challenges, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (or DSM-5) (American Psychiatric Association, 2013), is critically important because inclusion of a disorder in the DSM-5 allows for treatment and support to be paid for by the child's public school district if it interferes with his or her educational achievement. Early parent observation of sensory differences is often a child's first reported sign of autism, occurring as early as 9-12 months of age (Murray-Slutsky & Paris, 2000; Baranek, 2002). * Sensory profiles can distinguish among children with autism, children with ADHD, and children without those diagnoses (Tomchek & Dunn, 2007; Yochman, Parush, & Ornoy, 2004). * Well-developed sensory integration has strong correlation with academic achievement and cognitive processing. Early detection and management of sensory challenges can tie to predicting later academic performance deficits (Parham, 1998; Koenig & Rudney, 2010). * In a review of studies examining links between SI and ADHD, sensory-motor abilities of children with ADHD were lower than those of a control group. Other literature examines connections with disorders ranging from fragile X syndrome, mood disorders, behavioral disorders, and nonverbal learning disabilities (NVLD) to physically based conditions, such as premature birth, prenatal drug exposure, cerebral palsy/spina bifida/ Down syndrome, language delay, and other learning disabilities, as well as environmentally caused deficits, including abuse, neglect, or trauma.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Advanced Search