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451 results

Article

Communication Board as a Montessori Apparatus in Teaching Mathematics to Autism Students

Available from: Ukrainian Journal of Educational Studies and Information Technology

Publication: Ukrainian Journal of Educational Studies and Information Technology, vol. 7, no. 3

Pages: 25-31

Asia, Australasia, Autism in children, Europe, Indonesia, Mathematics education, Montessori materials, People with disabilities, Southeast Asia

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Abstract/Notes: The research of mathematics teachers and instructors is still focused on normal students. Students with special needs are often ruled out. In fact, they also need to learn mathematics. Mathematics is a very basic subject and must be mastered by everyone, including students with special needs. This research is intended to apply mathematics learning to autism students by using communication boards as a Montessori apparatus. Communication is chosen because autistic students have a visual learning style. Furthermore, the learning method is done with Montessori because it takes the concept of learning with the environment, in accordance with the main purpose of learning for autism students to be able to live independently and be empowered in the community. The study used the descriptive qualitative method. According to the research results several Montessori apparatuses have been chosen used including visual schedules, visuals to structure the environment, visual scripts, a visual rule reminder, the visual task analysis, and a choice board.

Language: English

DOI: 10.32919/uesit.2019.03.03

ISSN: 2521-1234

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Mathematical Literacy: The Effects of Mathematics Journals on Student Understanding of Fractions in a Montessori Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Upper elementary

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Abstract/Notes: It is a typical Monday morning. As students enter the classroom wearing brightly colored polo shirts embroidered with the school logo, their smiles are equally bright. This Title I public school in the heart of the city where 96% of the students qualify for free or reduced lunch has recently opened a Montessori option. Walking into the classroom, one 5th grade student eagerly asks, “Who’s on the bread committee this week?” Baking bread is a weekly occurrence in the upper elementary (4th – 6th grade) Montessori classroom. During the first week of school, this same student vehemently threw materials to the floor declaring, “I HATE fractions!” In an effort to positively engage students in mathematics, the weekly bread-making tradition was implemented. Through cooking, students experience the importance of fractions in everyday life. Each week, two students work together, read several recipes, select one, and submit a precise written list of needed ingredients. The next day, with the aid of a bread machine bought for $10 at the local thrift store, the students work together to follow directions, read fractions, measure ingredients, and bake bread. Once baked, students divide the bread into equal portions and serve. After several months of this routine, some recipes will need to be doubled or halved, and on it goes… The bread committee provides a “hook” for some resistant students. It is also a practical application of the role of literacy in mathematics. The choice to focus on mathematical literacy and the effect of journaling on student understanding was influenced by research around mathematical vocabulary as well as the instructional practices of noted educators and researchers. The rigor of upper elementary math as defined in the common core requires students to not only perform calculations with accuracy, but to demonstrate strong reading comprehension through the interpretation of real-world word problems, and to articulate an understanding of MATHEMATICAL LITERACY 3 mathematical reasoning through clear and concise writing. Achieving grade level proficiency has practical life implications for students because research showed mathematical knowledge during elementary school as a strong predictor of financial stability in adulthood, and understanding fractions in fifth grade as a predictor of overall achievement in mathematics (Siegler & Lortie-Forgues, 2015).

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2019

Article

What Makes Mathematics Manipulatives Effective? Lessons From Cognitive Science and Montessori Education

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: SAGE Open, vol. 5, no. 2

Pages: 1-8

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Abstract/Notes: Manipulatives are ubiquitous in early childhood classrooms; yet, findings regarding their efficacy for learning mathematics concepts are inconsistent. In this article, we present four general principles that have emerged from cognitive science about ways to ensure that manipulatives promote learning when used with young children. We also describe how Montessori instruction offers a concrete example of the application of these principles in practice, which may, in turn, explain the high levels of mathematics achievement among children who attend Montessori programs during early childhood. The general principles and concrete examples presented in this article should help early childhood programs maximize the benefits of using manipulatives for developmentally appropriate mathematics instruction.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/2158244015589588

ISSN: 2158-2440

A Comparison of Academic Achievement of Montessori and Non-Montessori Students in a Public School Setting

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Abstract/Notes: Relationships between academic achievement and type of curriculum delivery system, Montessori or traditional, in a diverse group of learners from a public school district were examined in this study. In a repeated measures, within subjects design, students from an elementary Montessori program were paired with agemates from a traditional group on the basis of similar Stanford Achievement Test Scores in reading or math during the baseline year. Two subsequent administrations of the Stanford were observed for each subject to elucidate possible differences which might emerge based on program affiliation over the three year duration of the study. Mathematics scores for both groups were not observed to be significantly different, although following the initial observation, the Montessori group continued to produce higher mean scores than did the traditional students. Marginal significance between the groups suggests that the data analysis should continue in an effort to elucidate a possible trend toward significance at the .05 level. Reading scores for the groups demonstrated marginally significant differences by one analytical method, and significant differences when analyzed with a second method. In the second and third years of the study, Montessori students produced means which consistently outperformed the traditional group. Recommendations included tracking subsequent administrations of the Stanford Achievement Test for all pairs of subjects in order to evaluate emerging trends in both subject areas.

Language: English

Article

A Comparison of Reading and Math Achievement for African American Third Grade Students in Montessori and Other Magnet Schools

Available from: JSTOR

Publication: Journal of Negro Education, vol. 86, no. 4

Pages: 439-448

Academic achievement, African American community, African Americans, Americas, Comparative education, Lower elementary, Mathematics - Academic achievement, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, Reading - Academic achievement, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori programs are expanding in public schools, serving a large proportion of African American students. Although recent Montessori research has focused on diverse public school populations, few studies have examined outcomes for African American students at the lower elementary level. This quasi-experimental study compares reading and math achievement for African American third grade students in public Montessori and other magnet schools in a large, urban district in North Carolina. Scores from end-of-grade state tests of reading and math are compared using a multivariate analysis of covariance. No significant difference in math scores was identified, but students in Montessori schools scored significantly higher in reading. This suggests that Montessori lower elementary instruction may be beneficial for African American students.

Language: English

DOI: 10.7709/jnegroeducation.86.4.0439

ISSN: 0022-2984

Article

Math Achievement Outcomes Associated with Montessori Education

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Early Child Development and Care, vol. 191, no. 7/8 (Early Childhood Theorists and Pioneers)

Pages: 1207-1218

Academic achievement, Angeline Stoll Lillard - Writings, Mathematics education - Achievement, Montessori materials, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: The math curriculum of the Montessori system of education for children ages 3–12 is distinctive, incorporating multiple manipulatives and educational practices which have theoretical and empirical support in research. However, studies investigating the math achievement and learning of Montessori students and alumni have not consistently found Montessori programmes to be more effective than conventional or other programmes. Through a detailed review of such studies, we find that a Montessori advantage in math is more likely when programmes adhere to important principles of Montessori education, when students have had longer immersion in Montessori programmes, and when assessments are more conceptual in nature. We suggest that future research should take into account programme fidelity and enrolment duration, and outline other directions for future research. Part of a special issue titled: Early Childhood Theorists and Pioneers

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/03004430.2020.1860955

ISSN: 0300-4430, 1476-8275

Doctoral Dissertation (Ed.D.)

The Influence of Montessori-Based Literacy Instruction and Methods on Reading Achievement of Students in Grades 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7

Available from: Seton Hall University eRepository

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Abstract/Notes: This study examines the influence of Montessori-based literacy curriculum and instruction on student achievement in Grades 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7. I studied 71 matched pairs of urban charter school students (n=142) to determine if there was a statistically significant difference in reading achievement, as measured by the Maryland School Assessment (MSA), between students who were instructed by their teachers in Montessori literacy methods and curriculum and students from a nearby charter school who were instructed by their teachers using a basal reading method. T-tests were used to compare the mean scores of the combined grade levels from each cohort on the 2011-2012 Maryland School Assessment (Reading section). The results of this study suggest that there was no significant difference in reading achievement between the two groups of students. There is very limited empirical research available examining reading achievement in Montessori public charter schools. Further research is recommended with similar groups of students from public Montessori school settings, or in this same setting with a different comparison group or a different evaluation tool.

Language: English

Published: South Orange, New Jersey, 2013

Article

Levels of Abstraction in Mathematics Learning Through Montessori Materials

Publication: MoRE Montessori Research Europe newsletter

Pages: 6

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: "MORE Abstracts 2003? It is time for innovation and thus for contrasting developmental and conservative boosts to come to the attention of the various places in which school action is performed everyday. Montessori materials seem to want to contribute to the representation of the complex concepts of arithmetic and geometry and certainly have allowed the identification and definition of learning models and teaching patterns that have led to defining the Montessori proposal as a method. They have played a key role in the construction of teaching processes that can determine an effective and motivating repertoire of task environments, consistent with the needs and mathematical knowledge of the times in which they were introduced and that they contributed to generate. Certain processes, such as those of abstraction, codification, decoding, transcodification and transfer characterising mathematics learning, in particular, in the various phases of developmental age, may be found in those processes, but also revisited in the light of intentional interconnections within the current developmental state of mathematical, psychological and scientific pedagogical knowledge. The conceptual, theoretical and applicative characterisations in the field of mathematics teaching dictated by the needs to explore the invariant and variable aspects of reality and to seek order to place as a basis of a method, may start up a construction and reconstruction process of the codes of logical and mathematical language on the part of learners, within the specific semantic fields that the task environment may propose. In this sense the materials could be reconsidered as a junction between interdisciplinary maps with specific perspectives inside the “method” but able to enrich themselves thanks to the contribution of the learning experience that “multimedia” children gain in other real and virtual places that go to develop the sense of self-effectiveness in the area of mathematics – a territory which cannot be considered, even today, as very appealing – and within reach of the child’s mind.

Language: English

ISSN: 2281-8375

Article

Montessori Mathematics: A Model Curriculum for the Twenty-First Century

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 19, no. 1

Pages: 3-9

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Abstract/Notes: Maintains that the Montessori mathematics curriculum is on the cutting edge of meeting the mathematical literacy needs of elementary and middle school students. Discusses how the curriculum adheres to and uses the five standards or goals for school mathematics as stated by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. (BB)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Montessori Mathematics Curriculum and Lower Elementary Students Understanding of Length Measurement

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Lower elementary, Mathematics education

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Abstract/Notes: The intent of this action research project was to determine to what extent the Montessori Mathematics curriculum support lower elementary students’ understanding of length measurement. The research took place in a private Montessori school classroom with first and second-grade students. There were 22 students in the class, 11 first graders, and 11 second-graders. Data was collected through a pre and post-test, field notes, and observations. The students also kept a journal and performed self-assessments. Photographs were taken to record the students’ use of different measurement tools. Children’s literature about length measurement was read and discussed with the students. The data indicated that students in first and second grade have a difficult time understanding length measurement, particularly reading standard measurement tools. While the Montessori mathematics curriculum supports student understanding of length measurement, it is clear that some of the students need to have other opportunities using nonstandard tools. Overall, the Montessori mathematics curriculum supported students understanding of length measurement. The findings suggest that additional materials need to be introduced in the classroom for students to utilize, and many opportunities are available to measure with nonstandard tools to completely understand measurement and length.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2015

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