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Conference Paper

Is There a Need for Handicraft in Preschool? Attitudes of Preschool Teachers and Parents on Including Handicraft Activities in the Regular Preschool Program

Available from: IATED Digital Library

INTED2020 14th International Technology, Education and Development Conference

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Abstract/Notes: Alternative educational concepts evolved in response to classical educational methods in which children are placed in a passive position and the transfer of knowledge is cultivated as a form of teaching. Models of alternative pedagogy (Montessori, Waldorf, Reggio, Agazzi) advocate developmentally appropriate practices which Bredekamp (1993) describes as a presence of different strategies, i.e., child-oriented behaviours of teachers and responding to the child's individual needs. In order to help each child to grow into a universal and competent individual from preschool age, it is necessary to encourage their imagination and creativity, as well as to acquire habits of cooperation and coexistence with other children. One of the activities which promote these desirable characteristics in children is handicraft. Many studies and findings in the area of neuroscience, multiple intelligences theories, and the aforementioned alternative pedagogical concepts emphasize the importance of handicraft and point out its benefits not only for children but for the entire community. However, such an approach to children's learning and activity is poorly represented in educational institutions. Therefore, the aim of the study was to examine the views of preschool teachers and parents on handicraft activities and its more frequent use in regular preschool programs. The survey was conducted by an anonymous questionnaire on a sample of 316 respondents, preschool teachers (N=141) and parents (N=175). The results of the study show that both preschool teachers and parents agree that certain elements of alternative concepts such as handicraft have a positive impact on the overall development of the child and that they are useful and practical life skills. They also agree that handicraft activities should be used in educational institutions to a greater extent. [Conference Name: 14th International Technology, Education and Development Conference; ISBN: 9788409179398; Place: Valencia, Spain]

Language: English

Published: Valencia, Spain: International Academy of Technology, Education and Development (IATED), 2020

Pages: 1511-1519

DOI: 10.21125/inted.2020.0499

ISBN: 978-84-09-17939-8

Article

Assessing Parenting Education: Parenting Styles of Adolescents in Rural and Urban Society

Available from: Indonesian Journal of Educational Studies - Research Institute of Universitas Negeri Makassar

Publication: Indonesian Journal of Educational Studies, vol. 23, no. 1

Pages: 72-80

Asia, Australasia, Indonesia, Southeast Asia

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Abstract/Notes: The objective of this study is to find out the differences of parenting styles in rural and urban society toward with adolescent’s involvement in family decision making. This research using a cross sectional survey method and embracing the theories of Montessori, Steinberg and Santrock about adolescent development, and Yusuf in parenting styles. The instrument used was adapted from the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire. It was consisted of 13 questions they were independency, responsibility, honesty, self-acceptance, receiving mistakes, trust, protection, freedom, involvement, and discipline. The result of rural society was the highest maximum value on the acceptance question (59%), namely admitting mistakes. For urban society data showed that the highest score of the questionnaire is about the parenting style of acceptance with a value of 62%. This meant that the result of the parenting style the child receives was the permissiveness style of care. The conclusion based on the area the urban society is more democratic in parenting. It makes teenagers more independent, confident and open minded

Language: English

DOI: 10.26858/ijes.v23i1.13797

ISSN: 2621-6744, 2621-6736

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effect of Parent Nights on Parents’ Involvement in Homework Support for Children

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: The presented research was performed to answer a specific question. What is the effect of an indepth Parent Orientation Evening and an Open House Material Night on parents’ involvement in homework support for their children in a mixed 1st – 3 rd grade Montessori classroom? The study consisted of fifteen students and their guardians. The six weeks of exploration began with a Parent Orientation Evening. It continued with data collection in Math Facts and Spelling Words Practice Sheets, Teacher and Parent Running Record, an Open House Material Night, and Parent Attitude Scales. The research found the two times guardians were invited to the school were helpful to explain the expectations of adults within the classroom and with homework. The findings also showed a small correlation between parents practicing math facts and spelling words with their children and the students’ weekly scores. Continuing the research for a longer period would help answer the initial question posed.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2017

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Nudging Parents Towards Parent Education Emails

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: This research studied the effects three different styles of email content has on sustained parent interest. Emailing is a cost-effective way of offering parents a glimpse inside their child’s classroom; but if parents do not engage with the emails or correspond with the teacher, the effort may be ineffective.. Over six weeks, 81 primary (3 to 6 years-old) parents at a small suburban Montessori school received one of three weekly emails containing photos or text intended to teach parents about Montessori education. The data suggests parents value photos rather than text. Teachers may see sustained engagement by sending regular photo-heavy emails of a number of children working followed by a brief caption. Text-heavy emails meant to describe the Montessori principles or materials should be created in advance, and be easily replicable and customized.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2018

Book

Together with Montessori: The Guide to Help Montessori Teachers, Assistant Teachers, Resource Teachers, Administrators and Parents Work in Harmony to Create Great Schools

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Language: English

Published: Minneapolis, Minnesota: Jola Publications, 2001

Edition: 2nd ed.

Book

Lillian de Lissa, Women Teachers and Teacher Education in the Twentieth Century: A Transnational History

Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Lillian de Lissa - Biographic sources, Montessori method of education, Oceania

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Abstract/Notes: Beginning with Lillian de Lissa’s career as foundation principal of the Adelaide Kindergarten Training College in Australia (1907–1917) and Gipsy Hill Training College in London (1917–1947), and incorporating the lives and work of her Australian and British graduates, this book illuminates the transnational circulation of knowledge about teacher education and early childhood education in the twentieth century. Acutely aware of anxieties regarding the role of modern women and the social positioning of teachers, students who attended college under de Lissa’s leadership experienced a progressive institutional culture and comprehensive preparation for work as kindergarten, nursery and infant teachers. Drawing on a broad range of archival material, this study explores graduates’ professional and domestic lives, leisure activities and civic participation, from their initial work as novice teachers through diverse life paths to their senior years. Due to the interwar marriage bar, many women teachers married, resigned from paid work and became mothers. The book explores their experiences, along with those of lifelong teachers whose work spread across a range of educational fields and different parts of the world. Although most graduates spent their lives in Australia or England, de Lissa’s personal and professional networks traversed the British dominions and colonies, Europe and the USA, fostering fascinating global connections between people, places and educational ideas.

Language: English

Published: New York, NY: Peter Lang, 2016

ISBN: 978-3-0343-1955-3

Doctoral Dissertation

Does Parental Involvement Matter? A Comparison of the Effects of Two Different Types of Parental Involvement on Urban Elementary Students' Academic Performance

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: This mixed method study seeks to utilize a comparative analysis to explore the impacts of two types of parental involvement in urban elementary school students’ academic performance. Epstein’s (1995) widely cited typology describes six different types of parental involvement, and this typology serves as a framework for this study. More specifically, this study compares learning at home and collaborating with community, as parent involvement types, to student academic performance. The study utilizes descriptive statistics and correlational analyses to compare parent-reported student performance via a survey instrument and semi-structured focus group interviews to collect narrative data. Parental involvement has been vigorously studied over the last two decades, however, not much data appears to address how collaborating with the community, as a form of involvement, influences student performance and other studies provide an ambiguous picture for learning at home as another parenting type. Furthermore, there is evidence that direct-action parent organizing, as a parental involvement form of collaborating with the community, may impact educational outcomes and this study examines these research areas. After analyzing the data, the researcher did not find evidence of a significant relationship between learning at home and parent-reported student academic performance. However, the study did reveal a significant association between parents who were collaborating with the community and the parent-reported academic performance of their children. This moderate correlation from an often overlooked parenting type, collaborating with the community, may harbor rich findings within the literature and point to the need for greater scrutiny herein. In fact, this provides a warrant for additional research to explore the “efficacy” of collaborating with community as a type of parental involvement that significantly influences positive student academic performance.

Language: English

Published: Baltimore, Maryland, 2018

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Impact of a Transition-to-School Program on Parent Involvement and Teacher Satisfaction

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to implement a transition-to-school program and evaluate its impact on parent involvement and teacher satisfaction. This action research study was conducted in a toddler and early childhood program at a Montessori school. This study involved teachers, administrators and parents. Prior to implementation of the transition-to-school program, a transition focus group was convened among teachers and administrators. In addition, data from previous years on parent attendance and involvement were gathered to measure any changes following implementation. The transition-to-school program was developed from feedback offered by teachers and administrators, and field research. After the transition to school program was constructed, implementation procedures were introduced to administrators, teachers and parents. Following implementation, evaluative surveys were administered to assess the impact of the program. The results of the research demonstrated that teachers, administrators and parents viewed the program favorably. The results show that the transition to school program positively impacted parent involvement and teacher satisfaction.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2013

Master's Thesis

Practical Partnership: An Interactive Montessori Elementary Handbook for Teachers and Parents

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: Parent-teacher partnership could dramatically improve educational outcomes for students (Bikmaz & Guler, 2003; Epstein, 2001). However, most teachers and parents lack knowledge and resources for creating this relationship (Christenson, 2004; Epstein, 2001; Henderson & Mapp, 2002). The interactive handbook is a tool for Montessori elementary educators and parents that addresses the common barriers to connection and develops a partnership to provide a continuation of lessons and values from the classroom to the home. The implementation is focused on the Montessori elementary context as it correlates to the "cosmic education" philosophy. Current parents and teachers in the public and private sector of Montessori elementary education evaluated the handbook, and their feedback was incorporated to be the most relevant and effective tool possible.

Language: English

Published: Moraga, California, 2011

Article

Parents as Partners: Creating a Culture of Respect and Collaboration with Parents

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 40, no. 1

Pages: 129-137

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Parents as partners is a slight digression in title from the grace and courtesy theme of the journal, but it builds its argument around the concept of cooperative relations between the parents and the school. Sarah speaks of the perception of the teacher and parents as each being unique and particular to the life and personality of each child. The teacher must see the positive in the child and have a natural respect and dignity so both want to act for the greater good and, likewise, must treat the parents as wanting to make their own contribution to their child as part of the whole-child community. Sarah goes on to suggest that diverse views of the same child are one of the most valuable offerings of a school. These varying perspectives override the linear view that assumes one perspective, which can be one-dimensional, reductionist, and can lead to labeling. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Grace, Courtesy, and Civility Across the Planes," Portland, OR, March 13-16, 2014.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

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