Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

1008 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

“My Name Is Sally Brown, and I Hate School!”: A Retrospective Study of School Liking Among Conventional and Montessori School Alumni

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: Psychology in the Schools, vol. 60, no. 3

Pages: 541-565

See More

Abstract/Notes: School liking shows clear associations with academic success, yet we know little about how it changes over levels of schooling, what predicts liking school at each level, or how attending alternative schools like Montessori might impact liking. To better understand school liking across time and education settings, we surveyed adults about how much they remember liking elementary, middle, and high school, and identified key school features that predicted higher school liking at each level. Because Montessori schools have many features that other literature suggests predict higher school liking, we purposely sampled Montessori alumni as well, and compared their schools' features for elementary school only (due to sample size). Moreover, we collected open-ended responses about what participants in both conventional and Montessori liked least about school, revealing what features of their school experiences might have led to less overall school liking. The unique contributions of this study are (1) showing how a wide range of school features predict recalled school liking, (2) examining data for all school levels using a single sample of participants, and (3) comparing recalled school liking and its predictors across conventional and Montessori schools. The sample included 630 adults, of whom 436 were conventional school alumni and 187 were Montessori alumni (7 participants did not report school type). Participants' mean age was 35.8 years (SD = 10.53, range = 19–77), and 53% were female. Participants were recruited online, and they responded to Qualtrics surveys about school liking, school features, and their demographics. School liking overall was tepid, and was highest in elementary and lowest in middle school. For all participants, recalling a sense of community and interest in schoolwork were most strongly associated with school liking. Adults who attended schools which emphasized studying topics of personal interest and rewards for positive behavior also liked school more. Montessori school alumni reported higher school liking and that learning was what they liked most about school; by contrast, conventional school alumni most liked seeing friends. Levels of school liking, as recalled by adults, are low overall, but are higher in elementary school and higher amongst those who recall their schools as having stronger community, catering more to student interest, and rewarding positive behavior. In addition, school liking was higher among people who attended Montessori schools. Further research could extend to a cross-sectional study of children currently enrolled in different types of schools.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1002/pits.22777

ISSN: 0033-3085, 1520-6807

Article

Program Profiles [Clissold School, Chicago, Illinois; Bonneville Elementary School, Pocatello, Idaho; Reading Community School, Reading, Ohio]

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 1, no. 2

Pages: 9

Public Montessori

See More

Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Conference Paper

Is There a Need for Handicraft in Preschool? Attitudes of Preschool Teachers and Parents on Including Handicraft Activities in the Regular Preschool Program

Available from: IATED Digital Library

INTED2020 14th International Technology, Education and Development Conference

See More

Abstract/Notes: Alternative educational concepts evolved in response to classical educational methods in which children are placed in a passive position and the transfer of knowledge is cultivated as a form of teaching. Models of alternative pedagogy (Montessori, Waldorf, Reggio, Agazzi) advocate developmentally appropriate practices which Bredekamp (1993) describes as a presence of different strategies, i.e., child-oriented behaviours of teachers and responding to the child's individual needs. In order to help each child to grow into a universal and competent individual from preschool age, it is necessary to encourage their imagination and creativity, as well as to acquire habits of cooperation and coexistence with other children. One of the activities which promote these desirable characteristics in children is handicraft. Many studies and findings in the area of neuroscience, multiple intelligences theories, and the aforementioned alternative pedagogical concepts emphasize the importance of handicraft and point out its benefits not only for children but for the entire community. However, such an approach to children's learning and activity is poorly represented in educational institutions. Therefore, the aim of the study was to examine the views of preschool teachers and parents on handicraft activities and its more frequent use in regular preschool programs. The survey was conducted by an anonymous questionnaire on a sample of 316 respondents, preschool teachers (N=141) and parents (N=175). The results of the study show that both preschool teachers and parents agree that certain elements of alternative concepts such as handicraft have a positive impact on the overall development of the child and that they are useful and practical life skills. They also agree that handicraft activities should be used in educational institutions to a greater extent. [Conference Name: 14th International Technology, Education and Development Conference; ISBN: 9788409179398; Place: Valencia, Spain]

Language: English

Published: Valencia, Spain: International Academy of Technology, Education and Development (IATED), 2020

Pages: 1511-1519

DOI: 10.21125/inted.2020.0499

ISBN: 978-84-09-17939-8

Doctoral Dissertation

Executive Function, Social-Emotional Skills, and Academic Competence in Three Preschool Programmes: Pathways to School Readiness

Available from: British Library - EthOS

Academic achievement, Comparative education, Executive function, Preschool education, Social emotional learning

See More

Abstract/Notes: Research findings indicate that executive function (EF), social-emotional skills, and pre-academic competence significantly promote children's school readiness and later success. School readiness broadly refers to a combination of skills necessary to function successfully in school and lack thereof may increase the risk of children's school problems. Therefore, it is essential for school systems to provide appropriate and timely support to the development of these fundamental skills. The present study focused on three particular preschool programmes: Montessori, Reggio Emilia, and the traditional play-based (British Columbia Early Learning Framework: BCEFL) programmes in Western Canada. Although they are popular, there is little empirical research that examines and compares the benefits of these programmes to the development of school readiness skills. As such, the present study aimed to 1) determine the effectiveness of these three preschool programmes in Western Canada on the development of children's school readiness; and 2) examine other sources of influences in the child, family and school in relation to the development of school readiness skills. Overall, 119 preschool children (48 Montessori, 42 Reggio Emilia, 29 BCELF) participated in the study. Observation was conducted once in the autumn of 2015 for each classroom using the CLASS observation tool. Teachers and parents of participating children filled in a series of questionnaires regarding the quality of their relationship with their child and their perceptions of daily EF and social-emotional skills of their child. The researcher also assessed individual children's fluid intelligence, EF, and pre-academic competence. The results showed that 1) although Montessori education appeared to be the most effective in facilitating numeracy skills, no curriculum stood out as notably more effective than any of the others at improving other areas of school readiness skills; 2) well-run classrooms where teachers were effective in time, behavioural, and attention management were most effective in promoting children's numeracy skills; 3) EF, social-emotional skills, and pre-academic competence exhibited an overlapping developmental process over time; 4) relational quality in both home and school environments significantly affected the development of school readiness skills, especially social-emotional skills; and 5) adults' perceptions of children's EF and social-emotional skills had a significant consequence for how teachers and parents formed their relationships with their children.

Language: English

Published: Oxford, England, 2018

Article

Mi-Careme Gayety Lure for Society; Dancers in Costume at Carnival at the Ritz for the West Side Juvenile Club

Publication: New York Times (New York, New York)

Pages: 11

See More

Language: English

ISSN: 0362-4331

Article

Fit for Life: A Plea for PE

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 12, no. 4

Pages: 42–44

See More

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Plant Life for the Montessori Child [Part 4 of 4 of"Science for the House of Children"]

Publication: Around the Child, vol. 16

Pages: 63-66

See More

Language: English

ISSN: 0571-1142

Book Section

Erziehung zum Frieden - aber wie?: Praktische Beispiele zur Friedenserziehung [Education for Peace - But How?: Practical Examples for Peace Education]

Book Title: Montessori-Pädagogik und die Erziehungsprobleme der Gegenwart [Montessori Pedagogy and Current Educational Problems]

Pages: 112-115

Peace education

See More

Language: German

Published: Würzburg, Germany: Königshausen und Neumann, 1990

ISBN: 3-88479-423-X

Article

Caring for Our Children by Caring for Ourselves

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 21, no. 2

Pages: 8

Public Montessori

See More

Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

A Rationale for: A Circle Game as a Means for Teaching Graphing

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: The Constructive Triangle (1974-1989), vol. 6, no. 4

Pages: 16–24

See More

Language: English

ISSN: 0010-700X

Advanced Search