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439 results

Article

The Place of Reading Recovery in Montessori Schools

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 20, no. 1

Pages: 68-84

Early childhood education, Literacy, Mary Maher Boehnlein - Writings, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Reading, Writing, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Discusses the Reading Recovery, whole-language, and Montessori approaches to the teaching of reading, suggesting the use of the reading recovery approach for those children who experience difficulty reading and writing in a Montessori classroom. Notes that Reading Recovery emphasizes writing to generate meaning, focusing on children constructing their own sentences.

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of Reading Fluency in the Elementary Montessori Classroom

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Lower elementary, Montessori method of education, Upper elementary

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this research was to identify ways of improving reading fluency for elementary children in grades first through sixth. Children scoring below the 40th percentile on reading standardized test scores, determined our testing population. Four data collections tools were used, including a child-centered survey, a reading fluency rubric, teacher observations, and fluency graphs. The Read Naturally Program was used as the reading fluency intervention. Students made fluency progress in both the upper and lower elementary levels. This research highlights the importance of reading fluency interventions. Further research might focus on self reflection for children using the iPad Read Naturally Program.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2016

Article

The Effects of Choice on Reading Engagement and Comprehension for Second- and Third-Grade Students: An Action Research Report

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 3, no. 2

Pages: 19-38

Action research, Americas, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Poor literacy rates contribute to low school performance for children across America. In particular, low-income schools continue to struggle with declining literacy rates. Issues with literacy are often attributed to lack of reading comprehension. This study tested the effects of choice on reading comprehension in second- and third-grade students at a high-income school and a low-income school. Students were observed while reading silently and aloud to see if either method affected reading comprehension. Data were collected from 32 students before, during, and after reading to determine whether students’ comprehension levels were higher when given opportunities to choose their own books or when they read assigned books. Trials were performed while students read silently and then aloud. Results indicated that students had higher comprehension levels both when they could choose their own books and when they read silently.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v3i2.6453

ISSN: 2378-3923

Doctoral Dissertation

Evaluating the Effectiveness of Montessori Reading and Math Instruction for Third Grade African American Students in Urban Elementary Schools

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

African American children, African American community, Americas, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Improving academic achievement for students of color has long been the subject of debate among advocates of education reform (Anyon, 2013; Breitborde & Swiniarski, 2006; Payne, 2008). Some scholars have advocated for the Montessori method as an alternative educational approach to address some chronic problems in public education (Lillard, 2005; Murray, 2011, 2015; Torrance, 2012). Montessori programs are expanding in public schools (National Center for Montessori in the Public Sector, 2014c) at a time when the American public school population is more racially diverse than ever before (Maxwell, 2014). A review of the literature reflects a lack of consensus about the efficacy of Montessori elementary instruction for students of color in general, and lack of attention to outcomes for African American students specifically (Dawson, 1987; Dohrmann, Nishisda, Gartner, Lipsky, & Grimm, 2007; Lopata, Wallace, & Finn, 2005; Mallet & Schroeder, 2015). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of reading and math instruction for third grade African American students in public Montessori, traditional, and other school choice settings, using end-of-grade standardized test scores from a large, urban district in North Carolina. Stratified sampling was used to select demographically similar traditional and magnet schools for comparison. Group mean reading and math test scores were compared using factorial MANCOVA and MANOVA procedures. African American students at grade three were found to perform at significantly higher levels in both reading and math in public Montessori schools than in traditional schools. No statistically significant difference was found in math achievement between African American third grade students in public Montessori and other magnet programs, although the Montessori group did achieve at significantly higher levels in reading. This suggests that the Montessori method can be an effective pedagogy for African American students, particularly in reading. Based on these results, recommendations are provided for policy, practice, and future research.

Language: English

Published: Charlotte, North Carolina, 2016

Doctoral Dissertation (Ed.D.)

The Influence of Montessori-Based Literacy Instruction and Methods on Reading Achievement of Students in Grades 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7

Available from: Seton Hall University eRepository

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Abstract/Notes: This study examines the influence of Montessori-based literacy curriculum and instruction on student achievement in Grades 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7. I studied 71 matched pairs of urban charter school students (n=142) to determine if there was a statistically significant difference in reading achievement, as measured by the Maryland School Assessment (MSA), between students who were instructed by their teachers in Montessori literacy methods and curriculum and students from a nearby charter school who were instructed by their teachers using a basal reading method. T-tests were used to compare the mean scores of the combined grade levels from each cohort on the 2011-2012 Maryland School Assessment (Reading section). The results of this study suggest that there was no significant difference in reading achievement between the two groups of students. There is very limited empirical research available examining reading achievement in Montessori public charter schools. Further research is recommended with similar groups of students from public Montessori school settings, or in this same setting with a different comparison group or a different evaluation tool.

Language: English

Published: South Orange, New Jersey, 2013

Master's Thesis

A Comparison of Reading Attainment in Two First Grade Classes in a State and a Montessori School in Switzerland

Available from: Massey University - Theses and Dissertations

Comparative education, Europe, Montessori method of education, Switzerland, Western Europe

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Abstract/Notes: The main purpose of this study is to examine whether the age at which children start to learn to read affects their later progress - specifically, whether an earlier start at reading gives children an advantage when they enter first grade at the age of six years. The study was conducted in Zürich, Switzerland, and compared a first grade class in a local school with two first grade classes in a Montessori school. There were 42 participants aged between six and seven years, 22 girls and 20 boys. The children were given a series of alphabet knowledge, reading and phoneme tests at the beginning and end of the year to measure the reading progress of each group. It was found that although the Montessori children who had already attended the Montessori kindergarten had an advantage over the local children, this advantage was only significant for alphabet knowledge, and was not translated into a significant advantage in either phonemic awareness or reading ability. Reasons for this were considered including the relative efficiency with which children learned to read in German at the local school, possible failings in the Montessori instruction, and the fact that many of the local children had already learned to read at home before starting school something that may be related to the high socioeconomic status (SES) and home literacy environment (HLE) of both groups.

Language: English

Published: Palmerston North, New Zealand, 2015

Article

Montessori Junior High School Students’ Perceptions on Their Self-Efficacy in Reading

Available from: Universitas Islam Negeri Sunan Ampel Surabaya Digital Library

Publication: IJET (Indonesian Journal of English Teaching), vol. 8, no. 2

Pages: 26-37

Asia, Australasia, Indonesia, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Perceptions, Southeast Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori approach deals with learning in independence and liberty. This way of learning requires students to explore information based on their learning interest. Therefore, reading has become one of the keys in learning successfully in a Montessori school. Moreover, the impact of self-efficacy on the learning outcomes has been explored in the educational psychology as a field of study. This study inspects students’ self-efficacy perceptions and their factors in reading comprehension in a Montessori Junior High School registered in 2018-2019 academic year. It is located in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. English is the main language used in the teaching-learning process in the school. The study is conducted by using mixed method. Findings are based on the 27 close-ended questions and three open-ended questions obtained from the students in grade seven and eight. In analyzing the results, concurrent triangulation strategy is applied. The results show that the students have positive self-efficacy perceptions on their reading (Average= 3.449/5), especially in reading, explaining, summarizing texts and comprehending the graphics found in the text without the guidance of their teachers. Their self-efficacy sources are found in their mastery experiences, vicarious experiences, verbal persuasion, and emotional and psychological states.

Language: English

DOI: 10.15642/ijet2.2019.8.2.26-37

ISSN: 2548-6497

Article

Oh, and We Do Reading Too

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 19, no. 3

Pages: 46-49

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: In this article, the authors describe the Reading Buddies program. In this program, children of varied ages experience cooperation and mutual respect, have fun together, and share themselves with others. When Reading Buddies meet, reading and learning to read are the activities, yet another real benefit appears to be the enhancement of the self-esteem of the younger children and the amplified self-worth of the older children. With Reading Buddies, teachers model for the older children and then the older children in turn model for the kindergartners. The process begins with a primary teacher giving a lesson to the elementary students on how to read with a child.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

A Year of Reading

Publication: Montessori Education, vol. 9, no. 1

Pages: 7

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Response to National Year of Reading

Language: English

ISSN: 1354-1498

Article

Acquisition of Reading and Writing Skills: Comparative Approach Between the Montessori Method and the Traditional Educational System

Available from: Central and Eastern European Online Library

Publication: Educatia 21, no. 16

Pages: 106-110

Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: The microstudy presented is a psycho-pedagogical experiment, which consists in applying the Montessori-specific experimental factor to a group of pre-school children in the traditional system. The investigative approach is based on a comparative study, the results obtained being interpreted from both a quantitative and a qualitative point of view. In this paper we started from the premise that Montessori strategies foster the acquisition of reading and writing skills at pre-school age. The general objectives of the investigation are the introduction into the traditional experimental system of alternative methods of acquiring reading-writing skills specific to the Montessori system and the study of the Montessori system for the acquisition of reading and writing skills in methodical terms and from the point of view of the results obtained by applying these strategies.

Language: English

ISSN: 1841-0456, 2247-8671

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