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686 results

Article

The Early Learning Foundation (ELF) Montessori Teacher Training Project [Cape Town, South Africa]

Publication: Montessori Leadership

Pages: 8–10

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

Article

Reaching for the Sky [Open Sky Nursery, King William's Town, South Africa]

Publication: Montessori Courier, vol. 3, no. 3

Pages: 8–9

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 0959-4108

Article

Exploring South African preschool teachers’ roles and responsibilities with executive functions

Available from: AOSIS Publishing

Publication: South African Journal of Childhood Education, vol. 12, no. 1

Pages: Article 1141 (9 pages)

Africa, Early childhood care and education, Executive function, Montessori method of education, Preschool education, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, Teachers

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Abstract/Notes: South African studies based on school readiness found that most children who commence formal schooling (from Grade 1) lack the basic skills needed to adapt within the learning environment – these include having challenges to follow instructions, work autonomously or focus on a task. The national guideline for teaching children between birth to 9 years does not specify how early childhood education programmes can facilitate or strengthen executive function (EF) skills through structured play. Structured play, can be understood as play activities that require guidance and instructions for completion. During the activities, the participants have to follow instructions in order to attain the outcome. Hence, there is a need to explore how EF skills can be developed through structured play. From our understanding, EF is an individual’s cognitive ability to regulate thoughts and actions needed to complete a task. Executive function skills assist learners to adjust and work effectively later (Grade 1) in a formal learning environment to perform academically. The study was conducted at preschool sites that follow different educational approaches. They are Montessori, National Curriculum Framework (NCF), Reggio Emilia and Independent Schools Association of Southern Africa (ISASA) preschools. The preschools are situated in affluent suburbs of Pretoria, Gauteng. In this article, learners refer to children aged 4 years in the Grade RRR class. A qualitative multiple case study design was utilised. We interacted with two teachers from four schools who followed different educational approaches. The data collection techniques included individual semi-structured interviews, lesson observation and document analysis, whilst photographs and field notes were taken when the teacher-participants interacted with learners during a planned learning experience. The generated data sets were inductively analysed and interpreted using the theoretical frameworks of sociocultural theory and metacognition. The interpreted data sets revealed that the preschool teacher-participants can facilitate EF using games, songs, movement exercises or racing competitions. The participants explained that indoor, outdoor and learning experiences facilitated EF skills such as self-regulation, working memory and cognitive flexibility during structured play. There is a need for preschool teachers to identify EF in the curriculum and know how to link and intentionally include the skills in daily learning experiences. This will ensure learners acquire EF and apply it in formal learning environments. The contribution to the body of scholarship is the development of guidelines for teachers to intentionally and explicitly develop EF skills using structured play. We confer that teachers play a role in enabling fun, engaging and hands-on activities that promote the acquisition of EF in the early years.

Language: English

DOI: 10.4102/sajce.v12i1.1141

ISSN: 2223-7682

Doctoral Dissertation

Barriers Contributing to the Minimal Participation of African American Parents in Their Children's Schools: A Qualitative Case Study of African American Parent Involvement in an Urban K–8 Elementary School in Minnesota

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

African American community, African Americans, Americas, North America, Early childhood education - Parent participation, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Parent participation, Parent-teacher relationships, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This research is a case study of African American parent involvement at a urban Montessori school in Minnesota. African American parents at this school have had limited involvement in conferences, PTSO meetings, school activities, and on the Site-Based Leadership Team. An examination of the literature was made to investigate the influences on African American parents when they make decisions about their parental involvement. This research covered the historical background, theoretical background, implications, racial barriers, and strategies that increased African American parent involvement. An ethnography was designed to gather data from 9 mothers of African American students. These parents provided information about their backgrounds and their experiences with the school. Staff at the school (6) were interviewed as to their experiences with African American parent involvement. The results of the study offer findings on attitudes, perceptions, needs and ideas for improving African American parent involvement at any school.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2000

Article

Venticinque anni di lavoro Montessori in Africa [Twenty-five years of Montessori work in Africa]

Publication: Vita dell'Infanzia (Opera Nazionale Montessori), vol. 43, no. 6

Pages: 48-53

Africa, Montessori method of education - History, Muriel I. Dwyer - Biographic sources, Muriel I. Dwyer - Writings

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Language: Italian

ISSN: 0042-7241

Doctoral Dissertation

Evaluating the Effectiveness of Montessori Reading and Math Instruction for Third Grade African American Students in Urban Elementary Schools

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

African American children, African American community, Americas, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Improving academic achievement for students of color has long been the subject of debate among advocates of education reform (Anyon, 2013; Breitborde & Swiniarski, 2006; Payne, 2008). Some scholars have advocated for the Montessori method as an alternative educational approach to address some chronic problems in public education (Lillard, 2005; Murray, 2011, 2015; Torrance, 2012). Montessori programs are expanding in public schools (National Center for Montessori in the Public Sector, 2014c) at a time when the American public school population is more racially diverse than ever before (Maxwell, 2014). A review of the literature reflects a lack of consensus about the efficacy of Montessori elementary instruction for students of color in general, and lack of attention to outcomes for African American students specifically (Dawson, 1987; Dohrmann, Nishisda, Gartner, Lipsky, & Grimm, 2007; Lopata, Wallace, & Finn, 2005; Mallet & Schroeder, 2015). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of reading and math instruction for third grade African American students in public Montessori, traditional, and other school choice settings, using end-of-grade standardized test scores from a large, urban district in North Carolina. Stratified sampling was used to select demographically similar traditional and magnet schools for comparison. Group mean reading and math test scores were compared using factorial MANCOVA and MANOVA procedures. African American students at grade three were found to perform at significantly higher levels in both reading and math in public Montessori schools than in traditional schools. No statistically significant difference was found in math achievement between African American third grade students in public Montessori and other magnet programs, although the Montessori group did achieve at significantly higher levels in reading. This suggests that the Montessori method can be an effective pedagogy for African American students, particularly in reading. Based on these results, recommendations are provided for policy, practice, and future research.

Language: English

Published: Charlotte, North Carolina, 2016

Article

A Comparison of Reading and Math Achievement for African American Third Grade Students in Montessori and Other Magnet Schools

Available from: JSTOR

Publication: Journal of Negro Education, vol. 86, no. 4

Pages: 439-448

Academic achievement, African American community, African Americans, Americas, Comparative education, Lower elementary, Mathematics - Academic achievement, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, Reading - Academic achievement, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori programs are expanding in public schools, serving a large proportion of African American students. Although recent Montessori research has focused on diverse public school populations, few studies have examined outcomes for African American students at the lower elementary level. This quasi-experimental study compares reading and math achievement for African American third grade students in public Montessori and other magnet schools in a large, urban district in North Carolina. Scores from end-of-grade state tests of reading and math are compared using a multivariate analysis of covariance. No significant difference in math scores was identified, but students in Montessori schools scored significantly higher in reading. This suggests that Montessori lower elementary instruction may be beneficial for African American students.

Language: English

DOI: 10.7709/jnegroeducation.86.4.0439

ISSN: 0022-2984

Article

'Collegiate News' in South Carolina [College of Early Learning, Columbia, South Carolina]

Publication: Montessori Observer, vol. 3, no. 7

Pages: 4

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Language: English

ISSN: 0889-5643

Article

Self Interest: How a South Carolina Foundation Created a Public Montessori Boom [Lander University, Greenwood, South Carolina; Institute for Guided Studies]

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 16, no. 2

Pages: 1, 28

Public Montessori

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Language: English

Article

Draft of an Educational "Charta" for the Development of Basic Education in Tropical Africa

Available from: Stadsarchief Amsterdam (Amsterdam City Archives)

Publication: Around the Child, vol. 10

Pages: 87-90

Africa, East Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, West Africa, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 0571-1142

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