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477 results

Article

Designing a Model Program for Young Children Which Responds to the Child

Publication: American Montessori Society Bulletin, vol. 9, no. 3

Pages: 1-21

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Session held at the American Montessori Society Centennial Conference/Seminar, New York, June, 1970

Language: English

ISSN: 0277-9064

Conference Paper

Culturally Relevant Education and the Montessori Approach: Perspectives from Hawaiian Educators

Available from: ERIC

Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, CA, Apr 8, 2006)

Americas, Culturally relevant pedagogy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, CA, Apr 8, 2006). The purpose of this study was to investigate why some Hawaiian language and culture-based (HLCB) educators perceived the Montessori approach to be congruent with their goals and values and to determine the salient features of the Montessori approach used by HLCB teachers who received Montessori training. The sociocultural perspective on learning provided the theoretical foundations and grounded theory methodology guided the research process. Interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with 40 HLCB participants, including 15 key informants who had at least 180 hours of Montessori training. Data also included classroom and school visits and analyses of school documents. Data analysis revealed six themes and two linkages that related the themes and their elements. Four themes were related to why HLCB educators have perceived the Montessori approach to be congruent with their values and goals. These were (a) similar views regarding their work as a lifestyle, (b) common pedagogical practices, (c) shared values and beliefs as educators, and (d) an overlapping world-view. One theme described the distinctions between the approaches. The final theme included challenges to implementing and maintaining HLCB programs. The findings suggest that researchers and teacher educators interested in culturally congruent education should take into account the underlying world-view of both the research paradigm and the participants involved, and that school reform should be comprehensive, culturally congruent, and generated from within communities and other stakeholders. They also indicate that culturally congruent, place-based education may enhance academic self-efficacy and could serve as a bridge between seemingly disparate educational approaches.

Language: English

Article

The Whys and Hows of the Multi-Age Primary Classroom

Publication: American Educator: The Professional Journal of the American Federation of Teachers, vol. 14, no. 2

Pages: 28-32, 39

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Discusses the advantages of mixed-age primary classrooms. Suggests different ways to group children of different ages and methods for successful implementation. Emphasizes the importance of an integrated curriculum similar to a Montessori curriculum.

Language: English

ISSN: 0148-432X, 2770-4432

Book

Questions About Montessori Education Today

Available from: ERIC

American Montessori Society (AMS), Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Abstract/Notes: In three parts, this symposium presentation to the American Montessori Society: (1) comments generally on current perceptions of Montessori education; (2) poses questions about practices in Montessori classrooms that challenge Montessori educators' core beliefs about Montessori education; and (3) discusses the cutting edges of contemporary Montessori methods education. In addition to general comments, Part 1 provides a discussion of the function of ideology in early childhood education and ways of opening closed belief systems to rational examination. Questions posed in part 2 concern essential aspects of classroom practices, the Montessori position statement, and general questions about Montessori theory to promote open discussion. Part 3, noting that a few decades ago the incorporation of pretend play activities into the Montessori classroom was the "cutting edge" of Montessori practices, asks such questions as "How would Maria Montessori respond to contempory educators' emphasis on project work and current advances in knowledge about teaching strategies that facilitate language development?" In conclusion, suggestions are offered on the substantial assets of the Montessori method, with a view toward future developments.

Language: English

Published: Urbana-Champaign, Illinois: University of Illinois, 1990

Article

Perspectives in Early Childhood Education: Belize, Brazil, Mexico, El Salvador and Peru

Available from: ERIC

Publication: Forum on Public Policy, vol. 2012, no. 1

Pages: 1-27

Americas, Belize, Brazil, Central America, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, El Salvador, Latin America and the Caribbean, Mexico, Peru, South America, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Early childhood education (ECE) provision is becoming a growing priority. During the past twenty years, Latin America has shown a growing recognition in the provision of educational programs for young children, birth to age eight, is essential. Urban and rural populations intimated in 2009, that many countries utilizing equitable access to quality early childhood programs is often seen by policy makers as a means of achieving economic and political goals (United Nations, 2012). Unfortunately, a pre-occupation with economic and political goals may conflict with the provision of quality programming for young children. In a number of Latin American countries provisions for educating young children exist as intent to provide quality services. The continuing challenge is to finance, organize and regulate those well-meaning intentions. The objective of this article is two-fold. First, to describe national policy efforts that regulate the education of young children consistently. And, second, to reflect the status of early childhood education programming; and to examine the possibilities for the improvement of the quality and accessibility of an education for all young children. Five Latin American nations have been chosen for examination, including: Belize, Brazil, El Salvador, Mexico, and Peru. (Contains 4 tables.)

Language: English

ISSN: 1556-763X, 1938-9809

Article

Individuality in Development

Publication: American Montessori Society Bulletin, vol. 4, no. 1/2

Pages: 12-24

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Paper presented at 4th Annual American Montessori Society Seminar, New York, June, 1965.

Language: English

ISSN: 0277-9064

Article

A Psychologist Looks at Montessori

Publication: American Montessori Society Bulletin, vol. 4, no. 1/2

Pages: 1-11

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Paper presented at the 4th annual American Montessori Society Seminar, New York City, June 1965.

Language: English

ISSN: 0277-9064

Book Section

Montessori’s Training Course

Available from: Springer Link

Book Title: America's Early Montessorians: Anne George, Margaret Naumburg, Helen Parkhurst and Adelia Pyle

Pages: 69-97

Americas, International Montessori Training Course (1st, Rome, Italy, 1913), International Montessori Training Course (2nd, Rome, Italy, 1914), Montessori Training Course (2nd, Rome, Italy, 1910), North America, Trainings, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Anne George, Adelia Pyle, Margaret Naumburg and Helen Parkhurst were all trained as directresses by Maria Montessori. George, Montessori’s first American student, took the course in 1910; Pyle and Naumburg were among the ninety students in Montessori’s First International Training Course in 1913; Parkhurst, one of eighty students, completed the Second International Training Course in 1914. Their training established their credentials in American Montessori education. Their role in the early history of the Montessori movement is largely an extension of and implementation of what they learned in the course. The training course consisted of lectures and clinical observations of Montessori classes. Montessori lectured on: (1) applying science to education; (2) the correct method of observing children; (3) using empirical techniques to render anthropological and clinical information into replicable and usable educational practices; (4) designing and using didactic apparatus and materials to develop children’s skills and abilities at crucial sensitive periods in their development. And (5) replicating the Montessori classroom, the prepared educational environment. After completing the course, George, Parkhurst and Naumburg faced the challenge of transporting and recreating the Montessori Method in the United States.

Language: English

Published: Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020

ISBN: 978-3-030-54835-3

Series: Historical Studies in Education

Article

The Childhoods' Network

Publication: Montessori Leadership

Pages: 8–9

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Southern African Montessori Association

Language: English

Article

Managing the Use of Resources in Multi-Grade Classrooms

Available from: African Journals Online

Publication: South African Journal of Education, vol. 39, no. 3

Africa, Classroom environment, Montessori materials, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Nongraded schools, Prepared environment, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa

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Abstract/Notes: This study examined how teachers in multi-grade classrooms manage and use available resources in their classrooms. The study focused on multi-grade classrooms in farm schools in the Free State province of South Africa that cover Grades 1 to 9. The concepts “multi-grade classrooms” and “resources” are explained below. The availability and utilisation of resources in multi-grade classrooms is discussed in some depth. A qualitative research design was used to collect data. Interviews were conducted with 9 teachers who worked in multi-grade classrooms. The data reveals that the availability of resources has improved somewhat in the multi-grade classrooms surveyed; however, textbooks specifically meant for multi-grade classrooms are still lacking. The data also points to several other trends. For example, most multi-grade schools in the sample have insufficient resources. Where available, the resources are either under-utilised or used improperly. Furthermore, it is usually the case that learners are required to share resources across various grades. Moreover, teachers often use their personal resources to get their work done, and in this regard, smartphones play an important part. Finally, the study also reveals that teachers do try to use various types of resources to cater for different learning styles.Keywords: activity centres; classroom organisation; Montessori educational theory; multi-grade classrooms; resource corners; resources

Language: English

DOI: 10.15700/saje.v39n3a1599

ISSN: 2076-3433

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