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950 results

Article

The Long-Term Benefits of Montessori Pre-K for Latinx Children from Low-Income Families

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Applied Developmental Science, vol. 26, no. 2

Pages: 252-266

Latin American community

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Abstract/Notes: This study used covariate adjusted regression techniques to compare the third-grade outcomes of low-income Latinx children who attended Montessori pre-K programs (n = 161) with those who graduated from more conventional programs (n = 4975) in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Children who experienced one year of Montessori education demonstrated stronger pre-academic skills at the end of pre-K and, in turn, performed better on standardized assessments of math and reading in third grade than those who did not. No differences emerged in students’ identification as gifted and talented nor in third-grade GPA. Taken together, these findings suggest that the benefits of one year of Montessori at age 4 may carry forward over time and to the extent that they do, these benefits are attributed to the fact that Montessori graduates entered kindergarten more ready academically. At the same time, however, the persisting benefits of Montessori were 60–70% smaller four years after program exit and were less robust than the end of pre-K outcomes.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/10888691.2020.1781632

ISSN: 1088-8691, 1532-480X

Article

Do Children in Montessori Schools Perform Better in the Achievement Test? A Taiwanese Perspective

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: International Journal of Early Childhood, vol. 46, no. 2

Pages: 299-311

Asia, Comparative education, East Asia, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Taiwan

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Abstract/Notes: The study examines whether elementary school students in Taiwan who had received Montessori education achieved significantly higher scores on tests of language arts, math, and social studies than students who attended non-Montessori elementary programs. One hundred ninety six children in first, second, and third grade participated in the study. Children’s scores were measured by Elementary School Language Ability Achievement Test (ESLAAT), Elementary School Math Ability Achievement Test (ESMAAT), and Social Studies Ability Achievement Test (SSAAT). One-way multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) showed that students who had Montessori experience had a significantly higher score in language arts in all three grade levels. In math, first grade students scored higher but not second and third grade students. However, in social studies, students who had received Montessori education did not score significantly higher than the non-Montessori students. There was also no significant difference between the number of years spent in Montessori programs and students’ language arts, math, and social studies test scores in first, second, and third grade.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s13158-014-0108-7

ISSN: 0020-7187, 1878-4658

Article

Why Montessori for Deaf Children?

Publication: NAMTA Quarterly, vol. 6, no. 2

Pages: 28-31

Children with disabilities, Deaf, Deaf children - Education, Deaf students, Inclusive education, Montessori method of education

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Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation

Everyday Spirituality: Supporting the Spiritual Experience of Young Children in Three Early Childhood Educational Settings

Available from: Massey University - Theses and Dissertations

Australasia, Australia and New Zealand, Child development, Comparative education, Montessori schools, New Zealand, Oceania, Spirituality, Waldorf schools

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Abstract/Notes: The focus of this research is the spiritual experience of young children in early childhood educational settings. Spirituality is included in the New Zealand early childhood curriculum, Te Whariki, but is a relatively unarticulated aspect of educational practice. In order to find out how spirituality is supported in early childhood educational contexts this qualitative case study research took place in three early childhood settings: a Montessori casa, a private preschool and a Steiner (Waldorf) kindergarten. The methods used in the research included participant observation, interviews and focus groups. The teachers were asked to make a video about spirituality to reflect their own context and photographs were taken in each setting. The metaphor of spiritual landscape is used in this research. In this landscape everyday experience merged with the spiritual to form the concept of everyday spirituality. The cultural theories of everyday life supported a realisation that ordinary daily activity can become wonderful and mysterious when the spiritual dimension is realised. The themes that emerged from analysis of the case studies are conceptualised as transformative aspects of learning and relationships. They are aspects of everyday spirituality identified as spiritual withness; spiritual inbetweenness; and the spiritually elsewhere. Representing spiritual experience is challenging. The thesis is written in narrative form and contains core narratives as prose and poems. Using writing as a means of discovery made communicating spirituality through the medium of words a possibility. Spirituality is proposed to be an inclusive concept that affirms a sense of connection and this thesis found that all pedagogical practices in early childhood settings have the potential to include a spiritual aspect. In Aotearoa New Zealand many children lead their everyday lives in the context of an early childhood environment that includes teachers and parents as part of that community. This thesis argues that when everyday spirituality permeates early childhood contexts that all aspects of the curriculum are realised and the spiritual experience of everyone connected to that setting is supported.

Language: English

Published: Palmerston North, New Zealand, 2007

Article

A Concurrent Method Case Study in the Montessori Environment for Children with Special Needs: A Review of Positive Effectiveness in Conjunction with Other Methods

Available from: Aichi Prefectural University Academic Repository

Publication: Ningen hattatsugaku kenkyu / 人間発達学研究 / Bulletin of The Graduate School of Human Development Aichi Prefectural University, no. 6

Pages: 67-83

Asia, Children with disabilities, Classroom environment, Comparative education, Developmentally disabled children, East Asia, Japan, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Prepared environment, Special education

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Language: English

DOI: 10.15088/00002124

ISSN: 1884-8907

Article

Montessori and Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 33, no. 2

Pages: 68–75

Autism in children, Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, Montessori method of education

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Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Doctoral Dissertation

The Nature of Teacher Control and Children's Freedom in a Child-Centered Classroom

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: This dissertation explores the meanings of child-centeredness in early childhood education (ECE), by examining the interrelationship of theory and praxis. This study included theories which underpin the concept of child-centeredness for current ECE teachers, including Piaget's and Vygotsky's child development theories and Dewey's and Montessori's educational philosophies. While these theories all advocate the importance of children's individual interests and needs in education, they diverge somewhat in their perspectives about the teacher's role in education. From these theoretical divergences arises a central question about the idea of child-centeredness: what is the nuanced relationship between teacher control and children's freedom? This study was conducted in a public kindergarten and based on interviews designed to elicit information concerning a teacher's pedagogical philosophy, and on observation of her classroom over a period of three months. The results of this study showed high teacher control and high children's freedom in a holistic teaching process. Teacher control and children's freedom were not exclusive of one another: children's freedom was defined in an active way, as freedom to participate, rather than in a passive way, as freedom from any constraints. Findings may offer some insights helpful to those who have struggled with the tension between teacher control and children's freedom in the context of critical and progressive pedagogy. Adopting multiple theories and reflecting upon or adapting them in order to meet individual children's needs embodies Dewey's advocacy of the intellectual responsibilities of teaching, which value “interaction” and “continuity” in the teaching process.

Language: English

Published: Bloomington, Indiana, 2004

Article

Latin American Montessori Bilingual Public Charter School, Washington, D.C., Hickok Cole

Available from: US Modernist Library

Publication: Architectural Record, vol. 198, no. 1

Pages: 98-99

Americas, Architecture, Bilingualism, Latin American community, North America, United States of America

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Language: English

ISSN: 0003-858X, 2470-1513

Report

The Possibility of Public Montessori Schools: Examining the Montessori philosophy and its prospect in American public schools

Available from: Vanderbilt University Institutional Repository

Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, Public Montessori, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: In an effort to explore the ways in which Montessori curriculum and public schools are cooperative or mutually exclusive, I will examine the principles of the Montessori philosophy as set forth by Dr. Maria Montessori in the areas of learners and learning, the learning environment, the curriculum and instructional strategies, and student assessment. After examining these sectors of the Montessori method, I will discuss theoretical possibilities in adapting the Montessori method to the American public school system in the early 21st century. For the purpose of this paper, I will refer to the author of the Montessori method, as "Dr. Montessori" and call the general method or portions thereof as "Montessori."

Language: English

Published: Nashville, Tennessee, 2007

Article

Dear Friends [Comité no longer part of American Montessori Society (AMS)]

Publication: El Boletin [Comité Hispano Montessori]

Pages: [insert]

American Montessori Society (AMS) - History, Comité Hispano Montessori - History, Comité Hispano Montessori - Periodicals, Marjorie Farmer - Writings, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

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