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304 results

Conference Paper

The University of Illinois Study of the Differential Effects of Five Preschool Programs

Available from: ERIC

Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (New York, New York, April 4-8, 1977)

Academic achievement, Cognitive development, Comparative education, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Longitudinal studies, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: This paper summarizes the findings from a two-part evaluation study which compared the effects of five model preschool intervention programs and examined 5-year longitudinal data on the effects of three of these five programs. The original five programs (Traditional, Community-Integrated, Montessori, Karnes and Bereiter-Engelmann) represented a continuum from traditional nursery to highly structured preschool. Brief descriptions of each of these preschool models are included. Seventy-five children who met age, income and family history criteria and had no previous school experience were divided into groups matched on IQ, sex, and race. These groups were then randomly assigned to a particular intervention model. Differences in effectiveness among the models were assessed by means of batteries of standardized tests which were administered prior to the intervention, following the preschool year, and at the end of the kindergarten year. Results from analyses of this data are presented and discussed. Follow-up data over three additional years were gathered on the Traditional, the Karnes, and the Bereiter-Engelmann models. The results and conclusions from these data are also presented. (JMB)

Language: English

Report

Nine-Year Follow-Up Study of Montessori Education

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: Results of an earlier six-year followup study demonstrated that a group of children with four years of Montessori education, including preschool and primary . school, score best on all seven variables of the third grade level Metropolitan Achievement Test (MAT). The group with no preschool experience scored lowest on five of seven variables of the test. The children in the highest scoring group had been in at least two different Montessori schools with as many as three different teachers. The strong positive results indicate that the common elements of the Montessori philosophy withstood the exigencies of being set forth by several teachers. The purpose of this nine-year followup is to investigate whether these positive effects are maintained up to sixth grade level. Twenty-eight of the 77 students evaluated at the third grade in the earlier study are again compared on MAT scores. Although no statistically significant results are obtained, those groups of children who had early Montessori training generally score higher on sub-tests of the MAT administered at sixth grade level than do those children who had Head Start or no preschool. Results obtained on the third grade MAT of those same children show similar but more brilliant results. Results of the study tend to re-confirm the importance of preschool experience for disadvantaged children. Research questions are listed. (Author/AM)

Language: English

Published: Cincinnati, Ohio, 1976

Article

History and Civility

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 40, no. 1

Pages: 103-111

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Abstract/Notes: Larry Schaefer's history of civility is a succinct summary of the implicit and evolving definitions of civility over 2500 years of civilization. Beginning with the Romans and the root word "civitas," meaning the rights and duties of citizenship, civility appears in classical literature as integral to the roots of democracy in the context of assembly. In the middle ages, civility referred to proper conduct and later became a courtly term then moved into the Renaissance as a focus on communities and the social celebration of human achievement. This researched overview of the history of civility constructs a broad definition of the term through historical phases and establishes civility as a universal human characteristic. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Grace, Courtesy, and Civility Across the Planes," Portland, OR, March 13-16, 2014.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Communicating with the Family for the Child's Best Chance for Success

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 39, no. 3

Pages: 121-129

Academic achievement, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Parent participation, Parent-teacher relationships, Teacher-student relationships, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Joachim Dattke describes a holistic approach to supporting the needs of the family when a child has a disability. The parent and child benefit from a two-pronged approach: working with doctors, psychologists, and therapists in clinic-based settings, and working with educators in schools and parent-child groups. He defines the importance of developing a personalized learning environment that implements specific aids and attainable objectives for each child. Approaching parents with empathy elicits the change of perspective that is needed for the family to understand how the child sees the world. Professor Dattke gives special appreciation to the Montessori educator who can "identify critical development periods in the child and look for objects and action sequences that the child may be interested in" and who prevent social exclusion by actively involving children in their social environment. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Building the Inclusive Montessori Community," Phoenix, AZ, January 16-19, 2014. Translation and editing assistance provided by Barbara Luborsky and Catherine Nehring.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Integrating Montessori Principles in Mental Health Education

Available from: CORE

Publication: Journal of Research in Business, Economics and Management, vol. 11, no. 5

Pages: 2247-2252

Child psychopathology, Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, Mental health, Mentally ill children, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: This research paper will seek to address the ensuing principal research question: “What has been the role of early childhood education for the mentally ill child?” The Montessori principles which can be found in the proposed research lies in the fact that relative research undertaken on the role of mentally ill children's education still continue to be in its infancy stage. There are a number of academic publications which have focused on the identification of key areas in need of further study between students‟ social, emotional wellbeing, mental health and their school success as well as academic achievement. This research aims to investigate to what extent Maria Montessori„s argument could be significant for today‟s educational policies for the mentally ill. Montessori studied her mentally disabled patients, listening and carefully noting their response to her attempts to implement Séguin's educational methods, as well as their progress in becoming increasingly independent and verbal. The study will target this void by enunciating, refining and encompassing some of the recent hypothetical viewpoints of Montessori education and mental care.

Language: English

DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.3952657

ISSN: 2395-2210

Doctoral Dissertation

Teacher Beliefs, Attitudes, and Expectations Towards Students with Attention Disorders in Three Schools in the United Kingdom's Independent School System

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, Attention-deficit-disordered children, Children with disabilities, England, Europe, Inclusive education, Northern Europe, Northern Ireland, Perceptions, Scotland, Teachers - Attitudes, United Kingdom

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Abstract/Notes: Scope and method of study. The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate the connection between the beliefs, attitudes, and expectations teachers exhibit towards students who have attention challenges in three independent schools in England and the pathognomonic-interventionist continuum as identified by Jordan-Wilson and Silverman (1991), which identifies, along a scale, where teachers' beliefs lie. Teachers' sense of efficacy as they meet individual student needs was also explored as was what educators in these schools, who have limited, if any, recourse to special education assistance, do to support students who display the characteristics of attention deficit. The pathognomonic-interventionist continuum and Bandura's (1977) construct of self-efficacy were the lenses used to focus the research. The study records participants' responses and reflections about the phenomenon under study, describing what it is they do, how they perceive their responsibility towards their students, and how they support each other. Findings and conclusions. Data compiled from a sample of 10 teachers and 3 head-teachers, were disaggregated to provide a picture of how participant teachers work with attentionally challenged children in selected English independent schools. The results provide evidence that teachers whose profile identifies them with the interventionist perspective present stronger senses of self-efficacy. They are prepared to undertake prereferral-type activities to determine where the student is experiencing difficulty and are then willing to manipulate the learning environment to meet individual student needs. Teachers in these schools perceive it as their professional obligation to design teaching scenarios to benefit all students. Teacher efficacy, their sense of their ability to positively influence their students' educational performance and achievement, is unrelated to years of experience or educational background, but is related to the beliefs which they hold.

Language: English

Published: Stillwater, Oklahoma, 2006

Article

Deconstructing the Positive Behavioral Support Model and Replacing It with the Neo-Montessori Constructivist Intervention Model, or How Montessori Changed My Cold Data Driven Heart

Available from: Wright State University Libraries

Publication: Electronic Journal for Inclusive Education, vol. 3, no. 3

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, People with disabilities

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Abstract/Notes: Positive behavioral supports (PBS) and the development of behaviorally oriented planning has become a ubiquitous paradigm in American schools. It is the preferred model for addressing behavioral issues with children as a means of preventing special education identification and placement. The effectiveness of this model has been well documented in peer-reviewed journals and shows an ability to change behaviors and improve academic achievement as measured by empirically designed assessments. However, the measurement of intellectual, moral and behavioral autonomy is seldom measured. Also, researchers from one perspective (Applied Behavioral Analysis) preclude other theoretical perspectives, to create the bulk of the evidence proving the usefulness of PBS as a viable model. It is the purpose of this paper to describe and support the contention that it is the concept of autonomy that is essential in measuring the success of behaviorally related interventions. This goal will be attained by deconstructing the PBS model. Further, it is an additional contention addressed in this paper that various Montessori methods and the theory’s fundamental theoretical concepts do a better job of addressing authentic change and the development of autonomy. This will result in internalized behaviors that behaviorally oriented methods can never demonstrate. A new theoretical model will be presented to illustrate the incorporation of autonomy into the rubric of successful behaviorally related interventions.

Language: English

ISSN: 1545-0473

Doctoral Dissertation

L’impact de la pédagogie Montessori sur le développement cognitif, social et académique des enfants en maternelle [The impact of Montessori pedagogy on the cognitive, social and academic development of children in kindergarten]

Available from: HAL Theses - Online Theses

Academic achievement, Child development, Europe, France, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Western Europe

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Abstract/Notes: La pédagogie Montessori est une méthode d’éducation qui a été mise au point au début du siècle dernier par Maria Montessori pour des enfants d’un quartier défavorisé de Rome en Italie. Depuis sa création, elle s’est développée à la marge de l’éducation nationale et se retrouve principalement dans des écoles privées. La pédagogie Montessori devient cependant de plus en plus populaire auprès des enseignants de l’école maternelle publique. Ce récent engouement apparaît fondé à la vue de plusieurs principes de cette méthode. En effet, elle promeut l’autonomie, l’auto-régulation, la coopération entre pairs d’âges variés et l’apprentissage à partir de matériels sensoriels et auto-correctifs. Ces caractéristiques sont plutôt en accord avec les connaissances scientifiques sur l’apprentissage et le développement de l’enfant. Cependant, à ce jour, les preuves expérimentales rigoureuses de son efficacité sont limitées. Dans cette thèse, nous avons mesuré les compétences langagières, mathématiques, exécutives et sociales d’enfants d’une école maternelle, repartis aléatoirement entre des classes appliquant la pédagogie Montessori ou une pédagogie conventionnelle. Nous avons suivi leurs progrès au cours des trois années de l’école maternelle (étude longitudinale) et avons comparé les performances des enfants en fin de Grande Section (étude transversale). Nous avons également élaboré une mesure pour évaluer objectivement la qualité d’implémentation de la pédagogie Montessori dans cette école, situé dans un quartier défavorisé. Nos résultats ne montrent pas de différences entre les groupes dans les domaines des mathématiques, des compétences exécutives et des compétences sociales. Cependant, les enfants issus des classes Montessori avaient de meilleures performances en lecture que les enfants issus des classes conventionnelles en fin de Grande Section. La pédagogie Montessori apparaît donc comme adaptée à l’apprentissage de la lecture chez le jeune enfant. [The Montessori method of education was created at the beginning of the last century by Maria Montessori to help children in a disadvantaged neighborhood of Rome in Italy. Although it is nowadays most commonly found in private schools, the Montessori method has gained popularity among teachers in public preschool and kindergarten in France and around the world. This popularity may appear legitimate with regards to the principles underlying the Montessori methods, which involve autonomy, self-regulation, cooperation between children from different age groups and learning with multi-sensorial and self-correcting materials. These characteristics are broadly in line with research on learning and development in young children. However, there is limited evidence for the effectiveness of the Montessori method in the scientific literature. In this thesis, we measured the linguistic, mathematical, executive and social skills of preschoolers and kindergarteners from a public school in which children were randomly assigned to classrooms in which the Montessori method was implemented or to classrooms in which a conventional teaching was used. We followed children from the first year of preschool to kindergarten (longitudinal study) and compared the performance of children at the end of kindergarten (cross-sectional study). We also developed a scale to evaluate the quality of implementation of the Montessori method in the school, located in a disadvantaged neighborhood. Our results do not show any difference between groups in terms of mathematical, executive and social skills. However, children from Montessori classrooms had better reading performance than children from conventional classrooms at the end of kindergarten. Therefore, the Montessori method appears to be well suited for developing reading skills of young children.]

Language: French

Published: Lyon, France, 2019

Uso de materiales sensoriales Montessori para desarrollar la noción de seriación en infantes de 5 años de la institución Educativa San José la Pascana, COMAS - 2016

Available from: Universidad César Vallejo - Institutional Repository

Americas, Child development, Latin America and the Caribbean, Montessori materials, Montessori method of education, Peru, Sensorial materials, South America

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Abstract/Notes: La presente investigación tuvo por objetivo determinar la influencia de los materiales sensoriales Montessori para desarrollar la noción de seriación en infantes de 5 años de la Institución Educativa San José La Pascana, Comas - 2016, el tipo de investigación fue aplicada con un diseño específico cuasiexperimental con grupos intactos (Grupo Experimental y Grupo de Control). La población estuvo conformada por 50 infantes, de los cuales estuvieron distribuidos en un Grupo de Control (aula Naranja) de 25 infantes y un Grupo Experimental (aula Celeste) de 25 infantes, la muestra fue de tipo censal debido a que se trabajó con toda la población. Asimismo, para el recojo de la información se empleó la técnica de la observación y como instrumento se utilizó la escala de tipo Likert, el cual constó de 20 ítems que permitieron medir los niveles que transitan los infantes en la noción de seriación, a su vez en el análisis descriptivo se utilizó el software IBM SPSS versión 22, el cual permitió obtener resultados confiables con las tablas de frecuencias y figuras en barra, con respecto al análisis inferencial nos permitió contrastar las hipótesis con los diagramas de cajas y bigotes. A través del estudio realizado se pudo evidenciar que después de aplicar el programa, el 84% de los infantes alcanzó un nivel de logro en el desarrollo de la noción de seriación. Por tanto, se concluyó que el uso de materiales sensoriales Montessori mejoró significativamente en el desarrollo de la noción de seriación en infantes de 5 años de la Institución Educativa San José la Pascana, Comas - 2016. [The present research aimed to determine the influence of Montessori sensory materials to develop the notion of seriation in 5-year-old infants of the San José La Pascana Educational Institution, Comas - 2016, the type of research was applied with a specific quasi-experimental design with intact groups (Experimental Group and Control Group). The population consisted of 50 infants, of which they were distributed in a Control Group (Orange classroom) of 25 infants and an Experimental Group (Celeste classroom) of 25 infants, the sample was of a census type due to the fact that all the population. Likewise, to collect the information, the observation technique was used and the Likert-type scale was used as an instrument, which consisted of 20 items that allowed to measure the levels that infants travel in the notion of seriation, in turn, in the descriptive analysis, the IBM SPSS version 22 software was used, which allowed obtaining reliable results with the tables of frequencies and figures In bar, with respect to the inferential analysis, it allowed us to contrast the hypotheses with the box-and-whisker diagrams. Through the study carried out, it was possible to show that after applying the program, 84% of the infants reached a level of achievement in the development of the notion of seriation. Therefore, it was concluded that the use of Montessori sensory materials significantly improved the development of the notion of seriation in 5-year-old infants of the San José la Pascana Educational Institution, Comas - 2016.]

Language: Spanish

Article

Motivation: The Foundation of Successful Learning

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 23, no. 1

Pages: 100-109

Academic achievement, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Mary B. Verschuur - Writings, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: Argues children's natural drive to discover is intrinsic and that adults cannot instill it from the outside. Dispels common myths about child motivation and describes the optimal conditions for self-motivated learning. Provides examples of how the Montessori-prepared environment makes the most of children's inborn curiosity, interest, and wonder. (Author)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

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