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952 results

Article

The Child and the Adult

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 19, no. 2

Pages: 60-68

Children and adults, Father and child, Mother and child, Parent and child, Religious education, Teacher-student relationships, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Discusses young children's relationship with God and the place of religion in their lives, focusing on the role of adults in proclaiming the essential elements of Christianity to children. Argues that even very young children can understand the essence of religion. (MDM)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Montessori: A Promising Practice for Young Learners with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 31, no. 4

Pages: 38-47

Autism in children, Children with disabilities, Inclusive education

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Abstract/Notes: The National Center for Montessori in the Public Sector (n.d.) estimates that 5,000 Montessori programs, including more than 500 public schools, serve students in the United States. Though no statistics have been compiled on the number of children with autism in Montessori settings, children with autism comprise 9% of children and youth served through the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (The United States Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, 2016). [...]the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2014) states that the number of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is increasing. Research comparing preschool-age children in Montessori learning environments with children in nonMontessori settings showed higher scores on math and literacy assessments for the Montessori children, as well as social skills, problem solving, and fine motor coordination (Lillard, 2012; Bhatia, Davis & Shamas-Brandt, 2015).

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Montessori Method for Strengthening Communication Skills in English as a Foreign Language in Young Children / Método Montessori para el Fortalecimiento de las Habilidades de Comunicación en Inglés como Lengua Extranjera en Niños Pequeños

Available from: European Journal of English Language Teaching

Publication: European Journal of English Language Teaching, vol. 7, no. 1

Pages: 104-126

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Abstract/Notes: This work aims to strengthen the communication skills in English as a Foreign Language of young children in Ecuadorian elementary schools. It used the action research method and a combination of qualitative and quantitative research approaches. The sample consists of 10 children of the second grade of elementary school and their parents. All they have permanent residence in the province of Manabi, Ecuador. The researcher team designed an educational intervention based on the Montessori Methodology to improve participants’ communication skills in English as a Foreign Language. The educational intervention lasted 6 months and used the contains of the second grade of the elementary education curriculum of Ecuador. The instruments used for data collection were in-deep interviews, class observation, and the vocabulary acquisition test of Windi (2017). The results showed that all participants improved in 3-4 points their scores of English communication skills from pre-test in comparison to post-test. It concluded that 100% of young children that participated in this research improved their communication skills in English as a Foreign Language when supported the instruction with Montessori Methodology. / Este trabajo tiene como objetivo fortalecer las habilidades de comunicación en inglés como lengua extranjera de los niños pequeños en las escuelas primarias ecuatorianas. Utilizó el método de investigación de acción y una combinación de enfoques de investigación cualitativos y cuantitativos. La muestra está compuesta por 10 niños del segundo grado de primaria y sus padres. Todos ellos tienen residencia permanente en la provincia de Manabí, Ecuador. El equipo de investigadores diseñó una intervención educativa basada en la Metodología Montessori para mejorar las habilidades comunicativas de los participantes en inglés como lengua extranjera. La intervención educativa tuvo una duración de 6 meses y utilizó los contenidos del segundo grado del currículo de educación básica del Ecuador. Los instrumentos utilizados para la recolección de datos fueron entrevistas en profundidad, observación de clases y la prueba de adquisición de vocabulario de Wendi (2017). Los resultados mostraron que todos los participantes mejoraron en 3-4 puntos sus puntajes de habilidades de comunicación en inglés desde la prueba previa en comparación con la prueba posterior. Se concluyó que el 100% de los niños pequeños que participaron en esta investigación mejoraron sus habilidades comunicativas en inglés como lengua extranjera cuando se apoyó en la instrucción con la Metodología Montessori.

Language: English

DOI: 10.46827/ejel.v7i1.3987

ISSN: 2501-7136

Article

Efficacy of Montessori Education in Attention Gathering Skill of Children

Available from: Academic Journals

Publication: Educational Research and Reviews, vol. 10, no. 6

Pages: 733-738

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Abstract/Notes: The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of Montessori education which is offered to upskill the attention gathering skill of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. In total fifteen preschooler participants, six girls and nine boys who are diagnosed with ADHD (7 of the children with ADHD, 8 with only AD), joined to this research. This is a research designed with pre-post test design study with a control group of experimental design. In this research with the aim of improving the attention gathering level; eye-hand coordination, development of tactile, visual and auditory senses and for improving their acquired distinctiveness “tactile boards, sound boxes, binomial cubes and color tablets” are used from Montessori materials. FTFK Attention test is applied to children before and after the intervention. After the training, when scores are compared, the significant improvement is seen in their post test scores.

Language: English

DOI: 10.5897/ERR2015.2080

ISSN: 1990-3839

Article

Montessori Mathematics in Early Childhood Education

Available from: Gale Academic Online

Publication: Curriculum Matters, no. 3

Pages: 6-28

Australasia, Australia and New Zealand, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., New Zealand, Oceania

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Abstract/Notes: Mentioned in AMI 2009 - The Montessori movement recently celebrated a century of international education, spanning from early childhood through to tertiary experience. The first Casa dei Bambini, or children's house, was opened in Rome, Italy, on 6 January 1907, and within three years the influence of Montessori education began to reach New Zealand shores. This article outlines the Montessori approach to early childhood curriculum in general, and discusses findings from a small research project examining mathematical concept development in children prior to school entry. Initial findings of the project indicate that the Montessori approach may have a positive impact on children's numeracy knowledge and strategies at age five. This research arose from the involvement of the authors of this paper in the development and delivery of teacher education degrees at early childhood education (ECE) and primary levels that include a Montessori specialty in their final year. Our experience in sharing both the Numeracy Development Project and the Montessori mathematics curriculum has resulted in many discovery moments for our students. This has led us to suggest that wider understanding and dissemination of Montessori curriculum ideas may help to progress discussion on early mathematics development.

Language: English

DOI: 10.18296/cm.0086

ISSN: 1177-1828, 2253-2129

Article

Throwback Parenting

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 27, no. 4

Pages: 60

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: The parent looked at me with worry, "Is that safe?" she asked, gesturing at our school's new playground, I turned to look at the source of her concern, The playground is made of natural materials, such as downed trees that act as Balance Beams, A 3-story tree house offers an aerial perspective of our 5-acre campus, A tunnel, covered By large, natural river Boulders, is hard to climB over, But it can Be done, Since the playground's opening, we've had no injuries, Children use it in new and unexpected ways every day, and enjoy play while gaining life experience, Elsewhere, though, playgrounds are getting "safer," Swing sets are Being removed, and straight slides replaced with curved ones that slow children down, The term "helicopter parent" has entered our vocaBulary, We adults proBaBly rememBer playing in the vacant lot until sundown, walking through the woods with neighBorhood kids, and taking a stroll to the corner store unaccompanied, A lot of people say, "Those were the days..[...]it's a lot different now," And it is different, Today, children have learning challenges, emotional issues, and heightened sensory awareness, Decades ago, it was rare to hear aBout these issues, But there is evidence to show that protecting children as we do today may Be detrimental, In one study, rats were prohiBited from playing freely during "a critical phase in their development," The result was that the protected rats learned to react to new situations with fear and aggression, and "failed to adapt and explore surroundings" (Gray, 2014), The same article notes that over the last 60 years there's Been a "continuous, gradual But dramatic increase in childhood mental disorders, especially emotional disorders," Experts suggest that this may Be a result of a gradual increase in prohiBited and protected play, In the Internet age, the continuous need to Be plugged into the media also fuels parents' fears, "If there was a kidnapping or case of child aBuse or child murder in one part of the country, those at a distance would never hear aBout it, But in our Internet-fueled world, we hear aBout threats daily, however distant they are., It's not surprising that many parents are terrified for their children's safety" (Taylor, 2015), But allowing our children to engage in so-called "risky play" has its Benefits, Children climB trees to "scary heights" to get a Bird's eye view of the world... and they get a thrill out of it, They ride skateBoards at high speeds, swing too high, and whiz down slides just fast enough to "produce the thrill of almost, But not quite, losing control" (Gray, 2014), They discover limits and push Boundaries, Their self-esteem soars when they learn to do things themselves, on their own terms, It may not Be easy to let your child walk home from school alone, or climB a tree all By herself.References Gray, P, (2014, April 7), Risky play: why children love it and need it [Blog post], Retrieved from https://www,psychologytoday,com/Blog/freedom-learn/201404/risky-play-why-children-love-itand-need-it Taylor J, (2015, March 23), Are you a free-range parent?

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Role of Physical Instructional Materials in Early Childhood Learning Centres

Available from: ResearchGate

Publication: Pragyamanch, vol. 30, no. 15

Asia, Montessori method of education, Nepal, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: The primary aim of this research is to assess the existing situation of instructional material in various public and private early childhood development centres of Lekhnath Municipality, Nepal. The sample was selected on the basis of different stratified random sampling comprised of 2 primaries, 2 lower secondary, 4 higher secondary and two fully community managed schools with the total of 27 schools around Lekhnath, whose school grade start with pre education were included of 10 sampled pre-primary schools. Data, observation by researcher, semi-structured questionnaire were obtained from of early childhood education program and formal discussion with parents comprises (N=30+10+10) additional interview data were obtained from 10 sample schools teachers/facilitators 10 head master were included. Direct observation was based on national educational and Montessori guidance were designing and implementing their programs. The study revealed that majority of community managed ECDs have (81.2%) instructional materials available with them; however, there is the increase in enrolment in private primary schools with English medium (7.3%). The enrolments in private ECDs are almost double as compared Governmental funded school in the year 2001-2012. Results indicated that there were inadequate educational materials in early childhood centres in public managed schools (primary, secondary and high) and low community participation in materials management. There has been little focus on the quality of early school management of learning materials. To improve program quality, more facilities, more time, and institutional recognition of their program’s value, financial support, and professional development opportunities were compulsory full-day play with learning, day snacks, government and local community should provide the more funds to manage child friendly pre-kindergarten can only meet holistic management of early child of Nepal.

Language: English

ISSN: 2392-442X

Cosmology and children: A phenomenological study of the Timeline of Light

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Abstract/Notes: This study asks: What is it like for Montessori children, ages 11-12, to experience a current and integral approach to cosmology via the author's original Timeline of Light Curriculum? Based on the cosmological principles detailed in Swimme and Berry's The Universe Story (Swimme &Berry, 1992) the 08 December 2012 Page 5 of 14 ProQuest curriculum is integral and multidisciplinary: art, music, movement, experiment, mathematics, geometry, prose, and poetry are all employed. The children's work is used as the phenomenological data for a subsequent hermeneutic (thematic interpretation). Three themes emerge from the work: the affective ground, the creation of a metaphoric Cosmos, and identity. The affective ground is described as the ground of feeling that sets the tone for both subsequent feelings and the creation of the metaphoric cosmos. The metaphoric cosmos is the creative interpretation of both each individual child and the group. That creation is fostered by the exercises presented in the lessons. This thematic relies heavily on the expanded definitions of metaphor as defined by Lakoff and Johnson (1980), and Samples' (1993). The study also describes an emergent theme of expanded personal identity resultant from the metaphoric ways the children described their experiences throughout their studies.

Language: English

Article

The Normalized Child

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 22, no. 2

Pages: 138-156

Americas, Aquinas Montessori School (Alexandria, Virginia), Child development, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education, Motivation (Psychology), Normalization, North America, United States of America, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Describes characteristics of the normalized child, the ultimate goal of Montessori education. First outlines children's basic needs, then describes traits of the normalized child, including love of order, work, silence and working alone; mutual aid and cooperation; profound spontaneous concentration; obedience; independence and initiative; spontaneous self-discipline; attachment to reality; sublimation of the possessive instinct; and joy. This was originally published as a booklet in 1971 (with other editions published in 1988 and 1998).

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Welcoming All Children and Families

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 31, no. 3

Pages: 20-21

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Maria Montessori (1965, p. 27) As I read AMS CEO Dr. Timothy J. Purnell's community announcement at the beginning of 2019 ("AMS Sees You-ALL of You"; amshq. org/Welcoming), I was excited that our AMS leadership was taking meaningful steps to clarify their position and lead the way in creating a more just world for our children and community members. Do our classroom libraries give our children "windows and mirrors" instead of tokenizing children of the global majority as minor characters or living dolls to be dressed up on special occasions? The authors offer these steps: * Identify a support person * Develop an awareness of your feelings and beliefs * Examine institutional advantages and disadvantages * Explore social justice activism * Create an anti-bias learning community.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

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