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560 results

Article

Mengtesuoli jiaoyuxue zhong de shehuijiaoyu [Social Education in Montessori Pedagogy]

Publication: Taiwan Jiaoyu / 臺灣教育 / Taiwan Education Review, vol. 330

Pages: 32-38

Asia, China, East Asia, Taiwan

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Language: Chinese

ISSN: 1816-6482

Article

Education as the Preparation for Adult Life: An Overview

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 36, no. 3

Pages: 179-185

North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

Listening to Young Learners: Applying the Montessori Method to English as an Additional Language (EAL) Education

Available from: Lancaster University

Language acquisition, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: With the current immigration and migration trends in Europe and worldwide, English as an Additional Language (EAL) education is becoming a prominent area of educational research. The discourse around EAL and social justice education has, until now, largely focused on primary, secondary, and post compulsory aged students. Preschool aged EAL children have been left out of the academic discourse. Pedagogical approaches need to be explored to marry EAL and social justice for preschool children. Maria Montessori’s pedagogical approach may be able to achieve this unity without compromising the language development that is desired. The following study is a piece of action research, applying the Montessori Method to a group of nine EAL children in the Canton of Zürich, Switzerland. The data gathered suggests that applying Montessori’s approach to EAL education, that of listening to the child and being attentive to hisher needs, gives autonomy to the student, and can promote social justice in preschool EAL education. Listening to the child occurs through ‘observation’ (attentiveness to the child), critical reflection of practice, and experimentation in education. In this way each child receives a customized education that has, at its foundation, respect for the child. Using ‘observation,’ field notes, and researcher reflections, it became apparent that young children are able to communicate their educational needs. TESOL outcomes were used to monitor the rate at which English was learned. Each language journey was vastly different, but regardless of the initial outcomes met, all children demonstrated increases in their comprehension and spoken English. It is important to recognize that children must be listened to and should be considered valued members in their education.

Language: English

Published: Lancaster, England, 2017

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Significance and Role of Aesthetic Education in Schooling

Available from: Scientific Research Publishing (SCIRP)

Publication: Creative Education, vol. 5, no. 19

Pages: 1714-1719

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Abstract/Notes: Every child needs planned, aesthetic education in order to influence the experiencing, feeling and enjoying of beautiful things as a counterbalance to our currently rationalized world. Since the contemporary school strives for the development of professional knowledge and skills on the basis of intellectual actions, while (at the same time) neglecting other dimensions of the child’s personality (emotions, feelings, etc.), it is one of the most important tasks of the education of children and young people to develop the ability to enjoy art and beauty, and in one’s inner and outer life to act in accordance with a sense of proportion, harmony and beauty. The purpose of the article is to highlight the significance of aesthetic education in the development of the personality as a whole, to shed light on the aims of aesthetic education, to define the aesthetic dimension of experience and to ascertain the reasons for the neglect of aesthetic education in theory and practice.

Language: English

DOI: 10.4236/ce.2014.519190

ISSN: 2151-4755, 2151-4771

Book

The Birla Education Trust: Golden Jubilee Volume, 1951

Asia, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Higher education, India, Preschool education, Primary education, Secondary education, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: This volume discusses the various educational initiatives and institutions in Pilani, India.

Language: English

Published: Pilani, India: Birla Education Trust, 1951

Master's Thesis

School Development Planning and Montessori Education in Ireland: An Investigative Study

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

Europe, Ireland, Montessori method of education, Northern Europe

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Language: English

Published: Dublin, Ireland, 2003

Article

Les principes de la psychologie appliqués à l'éducation [Principles of Psychology Applied to Education]

Available from: Université Caen Normandie

Publication: Pour l'ère nouvelle: revue internationale d'èducation nouvelle, vol. 8, no. 51

Pages: 221-223

Maria Montessori - Writings

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Language: French

Doctoral Dissertation

Uncovering Meaning in Montessori Teachers' Lived Experiences of Cosmic Education as a Tool for Social Justice

Available from: Stephen F. Austin State University

Cosmic education, Social justice

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Abstract/Notes: This inquiry focused on the lived experiences of Montessori teachers in implementing Montessori’s Cosmic Education as a tool for social justice in their classrooms in order to more fully understand Cosmic Education’s meaning, purpose, and practice. The researcher also sought to understand how Cosmic Education could be an effective pedagogy of place, providing historical and social contexts in which students may develop and grow. The study used a post-intentional phenomenological design (Vagle, 2014), and was based on a series of interviews with five Montessori teachers from different classroom age levels. The data were analyzed using poetic inquiry through the form of found poetry. Emerging themes of Cosmic Education as a pedagogy of place and how that pedagogy of place contributed to agency in social justice were identified.

Language: English

Published: Nacogdoches, Texas, 2017

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

La Aplicación del Método Montessori en la Educación Infantil Ecuatoriana [The Application of the Montessori Method in Ecuadorian Early Childhood Education]

Available from: Universidad Politécnica Estatal del Carchi (Ecuador)

Publication: Revista SATHIRI: Sembrador, vol. 15, no. 1

Pages: 122-131

Americas, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Ecuador, Latin America and the Caribbean, Montessori method of education, Preschool education, South America

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Abstract/Notes: El método de Montessori destaca la didáctica a través de los cinco sentidos, no sólo a través de tres de ellos como se hace tradicionalmente (escuchar, ver o leer), el docente deberá saber con previa evaluación lo que cada niño está listo para realizar. Esta enseñanza es un fascinante proceso de invención, lo que conduce a la plena concentración, la motivación y sobre todo el auto-control. El objetivo de la investigación es impulsar el hábito del auto-estudio y la autodisciplina, es decir que posibilita a que el niño trabaje con autonomía, favoreciendo el propio interés y la investigación que ayudan al niño a concentrarse en su aula; la metodología aplicada se buscó coordinar y alcanzar los objetivos propuestos mediante una investigación bibliográfica y relatos narrativos. La función del orientador fundamental es la del adulto, y en especial el padre, ya que se considera el principal guía del niño, quien es el responsable de mostrarle elmundo en sus primeros pasos. Esta enseñanza es un fascinante proceso de invención, lo que conduce a la plena concentración, la motivación y sobre todo el auto-control, los niños logran asimilar: una investigación propia e independiente, planificar, organizar, compilar información; crear: presentaciones, exposiciones y proyectos. [The Montessori method highlights the didactics through the five senses, not only through three of them as is traditionally done (listening, seeing or reading), the teacher must know with prior evaluation what each child is ready to do. This teaching is a fascinating process of invention, which leads to full concentration, motivation and above all self-control. The objective of the research is to promote the habit of self-study and self-discipline, that is, it enables the child to work with autonomy, favoring self-interest and research that help the child to concentrate in her classroom; The applied methodology sought to coordinate and achieve the proposed objectives through bibliographic research and narrative stories. The role of the fundamental guide is that of the adult, and especially the father, since she is considered the child's main guide, who is responsible for showing her the world in her first steps. This teaching is a fascinating process of invention, which leads to full concentration, motivation and above all self-control, children manage to assimilate: their own independent research, planning, organizing, compiling information; create: presentations, exhibitions and projects.]

Language: Spanish

DOI: 10.32645/13906925.935

ISSN: 2631-2905

Article

Cosmic Education at the Elementary Level and the Role of the Materials

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 22, no. 1

Pages: 40-63

Cosmic education, Montessori materials, North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Abstract/Notes: Defines Cosmic Education using Mario Montessori's concrete illustration of the interdisciplinary and synthetic nature of the program. Suggests that the "The Great River," a sixth "Great Lesson," can be a framework for the history of human cooperation, and that this story lays the groundwork for teaching an understanding of social cooperation and solidarity in Montessori schools. (KDFB)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

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