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582 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Magic School Bus Dilemma: How Fantasy Affects Children’s Learning from Stories

Available from: ScienceDirect

Publication: Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, vol. 210

Pages: Article 105212

Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Fantasy in children

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Abstract/Notes: Although children’s books often include fantasy, research suggests that children do not learn as well from fantastical stories as from realistic ones. The current studies investigated whether the type of fantasy matters, in effect testing two possible mechanisms for fantasy’s interference. Across two studies, 110 5-year-olds were read different types of fantastical stories containing a problem and then were asked to solve an analogous problem in a real lab setting. Children who were read a minimally fantastical version of the story, in which the story occurred on another planet “that looked just like Earth,” were no more likely to transfer the solution than children who heard a story that was slightly more fantastical in that the story occurred on another planet and that planet looked different from Earth (e.g., orange grass, a green sky). In contrast, significantly higher rates of learning were observed when the story contained those elements and two physically impossible events (e.g., walking through walls). Furthermore, this improvement was obtained only when the impossible events preceded, and not when they followed, the educational content. Although fantasy may sometimes detract from learning (as other research has shown), these new studies suggest that minimal fantasy does not and that particular types of fantasy may even increase learning. We propose that the mechanism for this may be that a small dose of impossible events induces deeper processing of the subsequent events in the story.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1016/j.jecp.2021.105212

ISSN: 0022-0965

Report

Montessori as an Intervention for Children with Dyslexia

Available from: National Center for Montessori in the Public Sector (NCMPS)

Children with disabilities, Dyslexia, Dyslexic children, Inclusive education, Learning disabilities, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: Many aspects of Montessori reading instruction inherently help meet the needs of children with dyslexia. Various Montessori materials can be used to help students with dyslexia master phonics, syntax, and other aspects of written language. Montessori environments are language-rich and replete with opportunities for practice with decoding, increasing fluency, and improving reading comprehension.

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., 2016

Article

Montessori Methods Adopted at Normal: Dr. Frederic Burk Explains the New System of Teaching Young Children

Available from: ProQuest - Historical Newspapers

Publication: San Francisco Chronicle (San Francisco, California)

Pages: 7

Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Abstract/Notes: Dr. Frederic Burk, superintendent of the State Normal School, yesterday afternoon explained the Montessori system of instruction to the members of the Parents Teacher Club. A class new is being taught in the primary department of the school, according to the Montessori methods with great...

Language: English

Article

The Tibetan Children's Villages

Available from: SILO

Publication: Montessori Articles (Montessori Australia Foundation)

Pages: 1-8

Asia, Displaced communities, India, Refugees, South Asia, Tibet

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Language: English

Book Section

Who Are the Variant Children?

Book Title: Montessori and the Special Child

Pages: 5-10

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, Montessori method of education, Special education

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Language: English

Published: New York: Putnam's sons, 1969

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Importance of Cursive Handwriting Over Typewriting for Learning in the Classroom: A High-Density EEG Study of 12-Year-Old Children and Young Adults

Available from: Frontiers in Psychology

Publication: Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 11

Pages: Article 1810

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Abstract/Notes: To write by hand, to type, or to draw – which of these strategies is the most efficient for optimal learning in the classroom? As digital devices are increasingly replacing traditional writing by hand, it is crucial to examine the long-term implications of this practice. High-density electroencephalogram (HD EEG) was used in twelve young adults and twelve 12-year-old children to study brain electrical activity as they were writing in cursive by hand, typewriting, or drawing visually presented words that were varying in difficulty. Analyses of temporal spectral evolution (time-dependent amplitude changes) were performed on EEG data recorded with a 256-channel sensor array. For the young adults, we found that when writing by hand using a digital pen on a touchscreen, brain areas in the parietal and central regions showed event-related synchronized activity in the theta range. Existing literature suggests that such oscillatory neuronal activity in these particular brain areas is important for memory and for the encoding of new information and, therefore, provides the brain with optimal conditions for learning. When drawing, we found similar activation patterns in the parietal areas, in addition to event-related desynchronization in the alpha/beta range, suggesting both similarities but also slight differences in activation patterns when drawing and writing by hand. When typewriting on a keyboard, we found event-related desynchronized activity in the theta range and, to a lesser extent, in the alpha range in parietal and central brain regions. However, as this activity was desynchronized and differed from when writing by hand and drawing, its relation to learning remains unclear. For the 12-year-old children, the same activation patterns were found, but to a lesser extent. We suggest that children, from an early age, must be exposed to handwriting and drawing activities in school to establish the neuronal oscillation patterns that are beneficial for learning. We conclude that because of the benefits of sensory-motor integration due to the larger involvement of the senses as well as fine and precisely-controlled hand movements when writing by hand and when drawing, it is vital to maintain both activities in a learning environment to facilitate and optimize learning.

Language: English

DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2020.01810

ISSN: 1664-1078

Article

Serving South Bend's Homeless: The Montessori Academy Program Serves Children on the Rebound

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 10, no. 3

Pages: 14

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Keeping the Peace: Helping Children Resolve Conflict Through a Problem-Solving Approach

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 3, no. 2

Pages: 31–37

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Same Age Children in One Class [public Montessori schools]

Publication: Point of Interest, vol. 5, no. 9

Pages: 1–3

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Language: English

Article

Aggression and Hostility in Young Children

Publication: American Montessori Society Bulletin, vol. 15, no. 3

Pages: 1-10

Anger in children, Behavior disorders in children, Child development, Socialization

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Language: English

ISSN: 0277-9064

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