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508 results

Doctoral Dissertation

Measuring Parent Perception and Understanding of Montessori Education in Three Massachusetts Montessori Schools

Available from: University of Pepperdine

Americas, Montessori schools, North America, Parents - Perceptions, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The Montessori method is a comprehensive, child-centered, developmentalist philosophy of education developed by Dr. Maria Montessori in Rome, Italy, in the early 1900s. The Montessori method differs from traditional approaches to education, and has had limited exposure in the U.S. until the last 20 years. Despite this growth, little research data exists on the effectiveness of the method or of parent understanding of the method. This research project attempted to determine parent understanding of the Montessori method of education at three Montessori schools in Massachusetts that educate children from toddlers to grade 8. The objective of the research was to design, implement, and analyze a survey that measured parent understanding of the Montessori principles and classroom practices. The survey was developed using the Montessori principles as the foundation. The goal was to determine both the extent of parent understanding of the Montessori principles and parent perception of how these principles are carried out in the Montessori classroom. Parents and guardians were asked a total of 10 questions, 7 of which were five-point Likert scales. The quantitative questions specifically addressed the six Montessori principles and were designed to test parents’ overall understanding of each principle. Responses ranged from a principle being not at all important to very important. The qualitative portion of the survey instrument utilized three open-ended, self-completed questions designed to reveal a range of parent perceptions about Montessori education and classroom practices. The surveys revealed that parent values and thinking do line up with some aspects of the Montessori method and philosophy. The surveys also revealed that parents seem to value classroom practices contrary to the founding principles. What parents value and what parents think about regarding concepts such as goal setting, achievement, competition with peers, and teachers preparing and presenting lessons is in direct contrast with some of the Montessori founding principles and intentions. If Montessori schools wish to remain viable, they will need to reconcile the Montessori principles with conflicting parent values and, further, determine how to better align their principles with parent views and desires for their children.

Language: English

Published: Malibu, California, 2015

Article

Lun ziyou jiaoyu shi yu xia de meng tai suo li kecheng ji qi qishi / 论自由教育视域下的蒙台梭利课程及其启示 [On Montessori’s Curriculum of Liberal Education and Its Enlightenment]

Publication: Dongbei shi da xuebao (zhexue shehui kexue ban) / 东北师大学报 (哲学社会科学版) [Journal of Northeast Normal University (Philosophy and Social Sciences)], vol. 2015, no. 2

Pages: 185-189

Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori’s curriculum is a hot issue in preschool education in the current, liberal education is the core value pursuit of Montessori education theory. Firstly,the concept of freedom is thought on philosophy, the history development of liberal education is describted, so as to understand the basic concept of Montessori liberal education; Then the implementation of Montessori’s curriculum is research on the ideas from liberal education. Finally we discuss the Montessori liberal education enlightens preschool education practice in our country.

Language: Chinese

ISSN: 1001-6201

Article

The Current Landscape of US Children’s Television: Violent, Prosocial, Educational, and Fantastical Content

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Journal of Children and Media, vol. 13, no. 3

Pages: 276-294

Angeline Stoll Lillard - Writings, Children's mass media, Children's television programs, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The present study examined currently popular children’s television shows to determine the prevalence of violent, prosocial, educational, and fantastical content (including fantastical events and anthropomorphism). Network, style, and content ratings were collected for 88 shows using a combination of Common Sense Media and laboratory ratings applied to two randomly-selected episodes of each show. Overall, currently popular children’s television shows were most often animated and contained little violent, prosocial, or educational content, but a great deal of fantastical content. Interrelations among variables were also examined. Shows with fantastical events were both more violent and more prosocial than shows without, and shows with anthropomorphism were more prosocial than shows without. The network on which a show aired predicted violent, prosocial, and educational content, but not fantastical content. Children’s television today is not as violent as might be believed, but nor is it particularly prosocial or educational. It is highly fantastical. The implications of the landscape for children’s behavior, learning, and cognition are discussed.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/17482798.2019.1605916

ISSN: 1748-2798

Article

Mathematical and Biological Strategies in Pre-School Education

Publication: American Montessori Society Bulletin, vol. 4, no. 4

Pages: 1-5

Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Mathematics education, Science - Study and teaching

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Language: English

ISSN: 0277-9064

Article

Some Cycles of Nature: Applications of M. Montessori's Cosmic Education in a Nursery School

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Journal of Geoscience Education, vol. 56, no. 3

Pages: 220-224

Cosmic education

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Abstract/Notes: By means of Montessori education, children aged from 3 to 6 years were introduced to the basics of earth-sciences in general and of glaciology in particular. For this purpose, a one-year-program was established under the principles of Cosmic Education (Sensu Montessori) in order to provide an insight in some parts of the afore mentioned sciences via 3 steps. Step 1 brought up introductory informations about earth sciences, historical geology, planetology, and climatology. In Step 2, specific information about the Ice Ages and glaciology was given by introducing a story about a personified glacier which included information on mass budget (ablation/accumulation), dynamics, features (crevasses), and in relation to those, the dangers of a glacier. Step 3 completed the program by giving the children the opportunity for depicting and acting out their knowledge via glacier-“modelling”, painting, dancing, and making music.After this one-year-program the children were able to give a simple account of the basic principles of climatology and glaciology, which may contribute to a more careful and respectful attitude towards their environment.The program turned out as a helpful and appropriate tool for giving an introduction into the great cycles of nature to preschool children, not only in nursery schools, but also at home with their families. In addition, the interactive and hands-on ways of presentation described were responded by the children with interest and sometimes enthusiasm, which is taken as further evidence for the tool's efficacy.

Language: English

DOI: 10.5408/1089-9995-56.3.220

ISSN: 1089-9995

Doctoral Dissertation

Hybrid Montessori Education: Teacher Reflections on the Care and Education of Under-Served Black Children

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

African American children, Americas, Culturally relevant pedagogy, North America, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, Public Montessori, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This qualitative case study explores how Montessori educators in a public charter Montessori school experience Montessori education for low-income Black children. Using the methodology of a qualitative intrinsic case study, semi-structured interviews were conducted with eighteducators (six teachers and two administrators). The participants are diverse in terms of age (26 to 54), race (three white, six African American), gender (two male and six female) and educational experience (2–25 years teaching). Education for Black children in the United States recounts histories of exclusion and segregation. Montessori education for children in the U.S. over the past 100 years shows a progression from exclusivity to inclusivity with the modern push for Montessori in the public sector. Neoliberal education reform is an important context to consider in the reproduction of injustice in American schools. This study’s findings show that participants are responding to this injustice. Negotiating tension, these educators draw onMontessori philosophy, culturally responsive teaching practices, and the tenets of an education for social justice to meet the unique needs of students who are impacted by trauma, inequity, and structural racism. Blending educational traditions to become more responsive to the conditions created by oppressive constructs has created a path through the tension. Prospect Montessori educators enact a hybrid Montessori program that focuses on relationships, communication, and social/emotional learning. This study’s educational implications stem from a call for Montessorieducation to examine its relevancy for under-served Black students.Keywords: Montessori, Neoliberal education reform, culturally responsive teaching, socialjustice

Language: English

Published: Chicago, Illinois, 2022

Book

Montessori, Dewey, and Capitalism: Educational Theory for a Free Market in Education

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Abstract/Notes: Synthesizing ideas from such disparate thinkers as educator Maria Montessori, philosophers John Dewey and Ayn Rand, and Austrian economist Ludwig von Mises, Montessori, Dewey, and Capitalism presents a philosophy of education-the theory of concentrated attention and independent judgment-that requires laissez-faire capitalism for its full realization. It is not an argument, except indirectly, for the separation of education and state nor is it a critique of present and past state-run schooling. It is an argument for the abolition of coercion in all areas of life. What is the ideal education system? asks the author. One that rejects the premise of obedience to authority. Not just in teaching, but also in parenting and in all social relations. Just as an ideal social system would allow citizens to pursue their values without interruption or control from an outside authority, namely the state, so also the ideal education system should allow children and students to concentrate without interruption on the learning tasks that interest them. The adult guides and nurtures the young, neither coercing nor neglecting them, to develop the confidence and independence required for an adult life in a capitalist society.

Language: English

Published: Upland, California: Kirkpatrick Books, 2008

Edition: 1st

ISBN: 978-0-9787803-3-3

Article

Assessment in Early Primary Education: An Empirical Study of Five School Contexts

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Journal of Research in Childhood Education, vol. 28, no. 4

Pages: 441-460

Americas, Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Within the current standards-based framework of early primary education, teachers must negotiate the integration of assessment with traditional, developmental orientations to teaching and learning. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine teachers' approaches to early primary assessment within five different school contexts: public, independent, Froebel, Waldorf, and Montessori. Data were collected from 12 kindergarten to Grade 2 teachers through in-depth interviews followed by ethnographic observations of eight classrooms. Data were thematically analyzed to identify core approaches to assessment across the contexts related to the following themes: (1) diverse conceptions of assessment, (2) commitments to student-oriented assessment, (3) knowing children through a practice of observation, and (4) assessment of academic standards. Underpinning these assessment themes was the fundamental commitment of early-primary educators to whole-child teaching and assessment. The article concludes with suggestions for future research that explore the intersection between teaching and assessment in play-based pedagogical contexts, alternative educational approaches, and systems of high accountability, with the aim of supporting teachers in bridging developmental and academic priorities in the early primary grades.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/02568543.2014.944722

ISSN: 0256-8543, 2150-2641

Article

Maria Montessori and Educational Forces in America

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 19, no. 1

Pages: 34-47

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: When Maria Montessori addressed two wildly enthusiastic American audiences at Carnegie Hall in December 1913, she thrilled the parents in attendance, but sent a shock wave through the educational establishment. Instead of accommodating skeptics from the teacher-training institutions seated there that night, she appealed directly to parents who found in the Montessori message an antidote to the miasma in their children's schools. Subsequently, the educational establishment that found more to dislike than to admire in Montessori marshaled their considerable power to discourage any permanent American Montessori movement for years to come. This article explores the clash between Montessori and optimistic American families versus the American educational establishment of the time. For further historical perspective, the author offers an analysis of the growth of the kindergarten movement and the emergence of progressivism in education as an outgrowth of the American Progressive movement at the turn of the 20th century. Maria Montessori's presentations at Carnegie Hall occurred at the apex of these convulsive forces.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Children’s Stories in the Educational Theories of Ellen Key, Rudolf Steiner, and Maria Montessori

Available from: Università di Bologna

Publication: Ricerche di Pedagogia e Didattica / Journal of Theories and Research in Education, vol. 11, no. 2

Pages: 47-66

Children’s Literature, Ellen Key - Philosophy, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Rudolf Steiner - Philosophy, Waldorf method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Abstract/Notes: The article explores the educational value that Ellen Key (1849-1926), Rudolf Steiner (1861-1925) and Maria Montessori (1870-1952) attributed to children's stories. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth century these three important authors contributed to the renewal of the educational theories and practices. They dedicated a part of their pedagogical reflections to the educational meanings of children's stories; consider, e.g., the many pages of Ellen Key on children's literature, the recommendations of Rudolf Steiner on the educational relevance of fairy tales and mythology or, finally, Maria Montessori's reflections on fairy tales. The article examines these ideas from a historical and pedagogical point of view.

Language: English

DOI: 10.6092/issn.1970-2221/6374

ISSN: 1970-2221

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