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839 results

Doctoral Dissertation

Listening to Young Learners: Applying the Montessori Method to English as an Additional Language (EAL) Education

Available from: British Library - EthOS

Language education, Montessori method of education, Second language education

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Abstract/Notes: With the current immigration and migration trends in Europe and worldwide, English as an Additional Language (EAL) education is becoming a prominent area of educational research. The discourse around EAL and social justice education has, until now, largely focused on primary, secondary, and post compulsory aged students. Preschool aged EAL children have been left out of the academic discourse. Pedagogical approaches need to be explored to marry EAL and social justice for preschool children. Maria Montessori’s pedagogical approach may be able to achieve this unity without compromising the language development that is desired. The following study is a piece of action research, applying the Montessori Method to a group of nine EAL children in the Canton of Zürich, Switzerland. The data gathered suggests that applying Montessori’s approach to EAL education, that of listening to the child and being attentive to hisher needs, gives autonomy to the student, and can promote social justice in preschool EAL education. Listening to the child occurs through ‘observation’ (attentiveness to the child), critical reflection of practice, and experimentation in education. In this way each child receives a customized education that has, at its foundation, respect for the child. Using ‘observation,’ field notes, and researcher reflections, it became apparent that young children are able to communicate their educational needs. TESOL outcomes were used to monitor the rate at which English was learned. Each language journey was vastly different, but regardless of the initial outcomes met, all children demonstrated increases in their comprehension and spoken English. It is important to recognize that children must be listened to and should be considered valued members in their education. https://doi.org/10.17635/lancaster/thesis/40

Language: English

Published: Lancashire, England, 2017

Doctoral Dissertation (Ed.D.)

A Comparison Study: The Impacts of Montessori and Conventional Elementary Standards-Based Language Arts Curricula on Preschool Students’ Phonemic Awareness and Reading Readiness Skills

Available from: OhioLINK ETD Center

Comparative education, Curricula, Language acquisition - Phonetics, Preschool education, Reading

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Abstract/Notes: Preschools have become an important beginning step in education. This sequential mixed methods study sought to determine if the Montessori preschool setting provides greater academic achievement in reading readiness, specifically phonemic awareness, in preschoolers as compared to a conventional elementary standards-based preschool setting. Social constructivist theory and sociocultural theory were used as theoretical frameworks. Qualitative data was comprised of interviews with kindergarten teachers who agreed unanimously that preschool had a positive impact on students’ academic ability upon entrance to kindergarten. However, all four teachers had a negative connotation pertaining to Montessori students and the Montessori Method based solely on students’ behavior and students’ lack of conformity. For the quantitative data, multiple two sample t-tests were conducted to determine the effect of preschool experience on all 90 participants’ reading readiness scores upon entrance to kindergarten based upon DIBELS FSF and PSF and their KRA assessment scores, while taking socio-economic status into consideration. T-tests were used to compare the results from 30 Montessori students, 30 conventional standards-based elementary students, and 30 students with no preschool experience. All three sub-groups were matched equally based on socio-economic status. Montessori students outperformed the other two school groups on all three assessments. The difference in scores when separating Montessori students by socio-economic status is the most significant finding to come from this study. Montessori students considered low income had statistically lower scores on all three assessments when compared to Montessori students who are not considered low income.

Language: English

Published: Findlay, Ohio, 2019

Master's Thesis (M.A.)

Montessori in the South Bronx: Considering Advantages for English Language Learners and Examining Tensions in New York City’s First and Only Montessori Public School

Available from: American Montessori Society

Americas, Language acquisition, Language development, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Public Montessori, United States of America

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Language: English

Published: New York City, New York, 2016

Master's Thesis (M.S. In Applied Linguistics)

Montessori Classrooms in Australia: An English as an International Language Perspective

Available from: American Montessori Society

Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Classroom environments, Montessori method of education, Oceania

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Language: English

Published: Melbourne, Australia, 2015

Master's Thesis

Acquisition of English as a Second Language for Hispanic Immigrant Adults with Low Academic and Socioeconomic Levels in the United States of America Through a Proposed Montessori Approach / Adquisición del Inglés como Segunda Lengua en Adultos Hispanos Inmigrantes con Bajo Nivel Académico y Socioeconómico en Estados Unidos de América: Proponiendo un Enfoque Montessori

Available from: American Montessori Society

Adult education, Americas, Immigrants, Language acquisition, Language development, Montessori method of education, North America, United States of America

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Language: English

Published: San Pedro Garza García, Mexico, 2017

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

Listening to Young Learners: Applying the Montessori Method to English as an Additional Language (EAL) Education

Available from: Lancaster University

Language acquisition, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: With the current immigration and migration trends in Europe and worldwide, English as an Additional Language (EAL) education is becoming a prominent area of educational research. The discourse around EAL and social justice education has, until now, largely focused on primary, secondary, and post compulsory aged students. Preschool aged EAL children have been left out of the academic discourse. Pedagogical approaches need to be explored to marry EAL and social justice for preschool children. Maria Montessori’s pedagogical approach may be able to achieve this unity without compromising the language development that is desired. The following study is a piece of action research, applying the Montessori Method to a group of nine EAL children in the Canton of Zürich, Switzerland. The data gathered suggests that applying Montessori’s approach to EAL education, that of listening to the child and being attentive to hisher needs, gives autonomy to the student, and can promote social justice in preschool EAL education. Listening to the child occurs through ‘observation’ (attentiveness to the child), critical reflection of practice, and experimentation in education. In this way each child receives a customized education that has, at its foundation, respect for the child. Using ‘observation,’ field notes, and researcher reflections, it became apparent that young children are able to communicate their educational needs. TESOL outcomes were used to monitor the rate at which English was learned. Each language journey was vastly different, but regardless of the initial outcomes met, all children demonstrated increases in their comprehension and spoken English. It is important to recognize that children must be listened to and should be considered valued members in their education.

Language: English

Published: Lancaster, England, 2017

Article

A Comparison of Piaget and Montessori in Their Theories of Language Development / Piaget와 Montessori의 유아 언어발달론의 비교

Available from: RISS

Publication: 德成女大論文集 / Duksung Women's University Journal, vol. 9

Pages: 447-464

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Abstract/Notes: The views and claims of Piaget and Montessori on child language development are compared and studied in comparison with those of other scholars in linguistics and psycholingustics. Most of their views and claims are converging on the following points. First, language development is biologically determined, the linguistic environment having only a triggering effect for the activation of the innate capacity of language development. Second, language development has no direct effects but only indirect ones on intellectual development. Third, the critical period of language development is roughly between the ages of 2 and 10, and there appears an "explosive" period of language development between the ages of 2 and 3 These findings on language development are yet to be fully utilized in early childhood language education through extensive experimental researches.

Language: Korean

Article

The Effect of Montessori Therapeutic Educational Program on the Learning Disabilities Child's Math & Language / Montessori치료교육이 학습장애아의 언어 및 수학교육에 미치는 영향

Available from: RISS

Publication: Montessori교육연구 [Montessori Education Research], vol. 10

Pages: 55-70

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Language: Korean

ISSN: 1226-9417

Book Section

Introduction: The Montessori Language Curriculum in Perspective

Book Title: Readings Toward a Montessori Language Curriculum

Pages: 1-8

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Language: English

Published: Lexington, Massachusetts: Ginn Press, 1986

Book Section

The Teaching of Reading and Language Arts in the Montessori School

Available from: ERIC

Book Title: Implementing Montessori Education in the Public Sector

Pages: 144-156

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Language: English

Published: Cleveland, Ohio: North American Montessori Teachers' Association, 1990

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