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Article

Montessori Milestones [Chiaravalle Montessori School, Evanston, IL; Wyoming Valley Montessori School, Kingston, PA; AMS scholarships]

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 5, no. 1

Pages: 15–16

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Back Door Montessori: In Corpus Christi [Texas], the Montessori Program Was a Success Before Outsiders Knew It Was a Montessori Program

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 9, no. 1

Pages: 1, 22-23

Public Montessori

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Language: English

Book Section

Psychologische Beobachtungen in der Montessori-Grundschulklasse [Psychological Observations in the Montessori Elementary School Class]

Book Title: Psychologisches zur Montessori-Methode: Aus dem Montessori-Heft der Neuen Erziehung [Psychological information on the Montessori method: From the Montessori booklet of the New Education]

Pages: 1-17

Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Observation (Educational method), Teachers

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Language: German

Published: Berlin, Germany: Hensel and Co. Verlag, 1927

Article

The Montessori Erdkinder: Three Abstracts [Montessori de Terra Linda, San Rafael, CA; Hershey Montessori School, Concord Township, OH; Lake Country School, Minneapolis, MN]

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 18, no. 1

Pages: 172–182

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Abstract/Notes: Describes three projects: (1) the Laufenburg Ranch Project, a historical organic farm and agricultural and environmental education center; (2) the Hershey Montessori School's efforts to teach adolescents about the earth; and (3) the Lake Country School, which developed a farm campus and nature center as an integral part of its educational program.

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

That's Not Montessori

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 21, no. 3

Pages: 24-25

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Abstract/Notes: The author could not contain herself one day at school recently when a parent of three children shared something she had heard from her eldest daughter. That morning, the eldest daughter was grumbling about the fact that she and her Lower Elementary brother had to go to school while her Preschool brother did not, and she announced to her mother, "That's not Montessori!." It got the author to think about the statement "That's not Montessori," a phrase she heard quite often in her first years as head of a Montessori school. Not having been trained as a Montessori teacher, she was at the mercy of teachers, parents, and trustees as to what was and what was not Montessori. She began to reflect on what "That's not Montessori" means. What is or is not Montessori is certainly open to individual interpretation and can be construed to make a particular point, but, undeniably, Montessori is about children. After reading about Dr. Montessori's philosophy, working with so many dedicated Montessori teachers, attending American Montessori Society (AMS) Annual Conferences, and chairing accreditation committees, the author has been immeasurably helped in her understanding that Montessori is about respecting the child and establishing an environment where the child can learn on his own, making decisions that affect his life and the lives of others.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Madame Montessori Coming

Available from: Newspapers.com

Publication: Venice Vanguard (Venice, California)

Pages: 3

Americas, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: "Madame Montessori Coming- Los Angeles is to have the first demonstration, outside of Italy, of the world-famous Montessori system of teaching. May first, the great educator is coming and beach educators and those interested in child education are taking much interest in the event, which will be epoch making in its significance. Opinions differ largely as to the benefits to be derived from Madame Montessori's visit though all are loud in the praises of her methods as to the best way of reaching the child mind. Professori Cree T. Work of the Venice High School, call Madame Montessori's methods good and rational, the Venice educator has always felt in close sympathy with the plans that followed up the Froebel ideas, which take much the form of this Italian woman's system. "I think her visit here should be of great interest and help to us," said Mr. Work this morning, "we have a great number of her ideas working in our kindergartens at the present time, but she has combined them, and made them into splendid whole, that may be able to give us new ideas and new inspirations. Her ideas in the form of a system, will work wonders." Mrs. W. H. Anderson, president of the Venice Woman's Club, expressed herself as believing firmly in the Montessori system, which is an outgrowth of the article written years ago, by Radosavovich, head of the department of Pedagogy of the University of New York. These articles were published in German and admitted by the Italian teacher, as being of great help to her. "Madame Montessori is no doubt, the foremost educator of the day," said Mrs. Anderson, "I have known, from long study of my own children, that the child mind must be led through its impressions and not forced to accept its education. Their inclinations must lead to their development, in fact, the system is a Burbanking of the human mind, a grafting of impressions where and when they will best take root and develop." Mrs. Anderson speaks from experience, as she has carefully watched, step by step, the development of her own lovely daughters. Professor W. Y. Thornbury, principal of the Venice Grammar Schools, is not as enthusiastic about the Montessori system. Mr. Thornbury says, he has given some little time to the study of her system, and thinks she states a fallacy, when she says that a 3-year old child can do the same things that a child of 6 or 16 can accomplish. "The regular kindergarten work, as advocated by Froebel has all the time upheld the idea of the appeal to the senses of the child, and making him learn through self activity," said Mr. Thornbury, "and I don't think she has added anything to help us materially, I think her method embraces childhood at far to early an age; at 3 years old, the child should still be under guidance of a mother, instead of a teacher, and at the age of 4 and one-half years, when out kindergartens take them, I think our system can scarcely be added to, by that of the Italian teacher. We have tried to purchase part of the material used in her system, but can not do so without taking the whole, which, costs fifty dollars, and is well protected by a copyright." Miss Catherine Moore, who is conducting the arrangements for Dr. Montessori's coming, May 1, is receiving letters and telegrams from prominent educators all over the country. Many of them are coming. Mrs. Alexander Graham Bell, president of the Montessori Educational Association of Washington, D. C., has just written congratulating Los Angeles and offering cooperation. The association includes Philander P. Claxton, United States commissioner of Education; Miss Margaret Woodrow Wilson and many other members of Washington official circles. San Francisco wants the "Dottoressa," and so does San Diego. "President Francis, by his early recognition and understanding of her system, is to be credited for the coming of Dr. Montessori to Los Angeles first of any city outside of Italy," said Miss Moore. "The whole country is now interested." Classes will be held at the East Seventh street school, Saint Catherine's nonsectarian school and the Hotel Maryland, Pasadena. The children of Miss Moore's class at Saint Catherine's will be used for demonstrations every Saturday during the course. Dr. Montessori has accepted the invitation of the officials of the San Diego Exposition to visit the exposition in July, according to Mrs. Mary Paul-Jordon of 456 North Juanita street. Officials of the exposition received a cablegram from Dr. Montessori, who is still in Rome, late yesterday. This information was received by Dr. Jordon in a telegram from Duncan MacKinnon, superintendent of schools of the Southern city [San Diego], last night."

Language: English

Book Section

Einige Hinweise zur Montessori-Literatur [Some references to the Montessori literature]

Book Title: Die Montessori-Pädagogik und das behinderte Kind: Referate und Ergebnisse des 18. Internationalen Montessori Kongresses (München, 4-8 Juli 1977) [Montessori Pedagogy and the Handicapped Child: Papers and Results of the 18th International Montessori Congress (Munich, July 4-8, 1977)]

Pages: 199-215

Conferences, International Montessori Congress (18th, Munich, Germany, 4-8 July 1977), Montessori method of education - Research

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Language: German

Published: München: Kindler, 1978

ISBN: 3-463-00716-9

Book Section

Maria Montessori e l'India [Maria Montessori and India]

Book Title: Maria Montessori cittadina del mondo [Maria Montessori, citizen of the world]

Pages: 278-279

Asia, Conferences, India, International Montessori Congress (8th, San Remo, Italy, 22-29 August 1949), South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Dal volume degli Atti dell'VIII Congresso Internazionale Montessori, svoltosi a S. Remo dal 22 al 29 agosto 1949 sul tema: "La formazione dell'uomo nella ricostruzione mondiale", edizione "Opera Montessori", Roma 1950, riportiamo il saluto augurale dell'Addetto culturale all'Ambasciata indiana di Roma, Madanjeet Singh. [From the volume of the Proceedings of the VIII Montessori International Congress, held in San Remo from 22 to 29 August 1949 on the theme: "The formation of man in world reconstruction", "Opera Montessori" edition, Rome 1950, we report the greeting of Cultural Attaché at the Indian Embassy in Rome, Madanjeet Singh.]

Language: Italian

Published: Roma: Comitato italiano dell'OMEP, 1967

Article

L’entrée en pédagogie Montessori d’enseignant.e.s d’écoles maternelles publiques française depuis 2010: Raisons et modalités [The entry into Montessori pedagogy of French public nursery school teachers since 2010: Reasons and modalities]

Available from: CAIRN

Publication: Spécificités, vol. 12, no. 1

Pages: 14-30

Europe, France, Montessori method of education - Teachers, Teachers, Western Europe

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Abstract/Notes: La proposition pédagogique de Maria Montessori, au début du XXème siècle, était une alternative à l’enseignement traditionnel. Elle connait, un siècle plus tard, un engouement sans précédent dans l’école maternelle publique française. Quatre éléments contextuels en ont permis l’émergence : l’évolution de la prescription institutionnelle à l’égard de l’école maternelle ; des enseignants confrontés à des demandes sociétales et institutionnelles paradoxales ; des pratiques pédagogiques qui s’essoufflent ; une motivation des enseignants à faire faire évoluer ces mêmes pratiques. Une primarisation croissante de l’école maternelle en conflit avec une demande sociétale de prise en compte plus individuelle de l’enfant a en effet déstabilisé le corps enseignant créant ainsi les conditions d’un changement de pratiques. Dans ce développement, les réseaux créés sur Internet ont joué un rôle majeur pour permettre cette entrée en pédagogie Montessori, entre adaptation à la réalité des classes et conformité aux demandes institutionnelles. Au-delà des raisons qui ont présidé à la naissance de ce mouvement, il s’agit également, dans cet article, de retracer le parcours des premiers enseignants. Comment sont-ils parvenus à la pédagogie Montessori, se sont-ils formés à cette pédagogie et si oui de quelle façon ? [At the beginning of the 20th century, Maria Montessori's pedagogical was an alternative to traditional teaching. A century later, it is experiencing an unprecedented craze in French public nursery schools. Four contextual elements have enabled it to emerge: the evolution of institutional prescription with regard to nursery schools; teachers confronted with paradoxical societal and institutional demands; educational practices that are running out of steam; and teachers' motivation to change these same practices. The nursery schools becoming more like elementary schools in conflict with a societal demand for more individual attention to children has destabilized the teaching profession, thus creating the conditions for a change in practices. In this development, the networks created on the Internet have played a major role in allowing this entry into Montessori pedagogy, between adaptation to the reality of the classes and compliance with institutional demands. Beyond the reasons that led to the birth of this movement, this article also aims to retrace the career paths of the first teachers. How did they come to Montessori pedagogy, did they learn this pedagogy and if so in what way?]

Language: French

DOI: 10.3917/spec.012.0014

ISSN: 2256-7186

Book Section

Die Montessori-Bewegung im Kanton Wallis [The Montessori Movement in the Canton of Valais]

Book Title: Hundert Jahre Montessori-Pädagogik, 1907-2007: Eine Chronik der Montessori-Pädagogik in der Schweiz [One Hundred Years of Montessori Education, 1907-2007: A Chronicle of Montessori Education in Switzerland]

Pages: 135-140

Europe, Marianne Oggier - Biographic sources, Marthe Martin - Biographic sources, Montessori method of education, Montessori movement, Montessori schools, Sister Marie-René Rouiller - Biographic sources, Switzerland, Western Europe

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Language: German

Published: Bern, Switzerland: Haupt Verlag, 2007

Edition: 1st edition

ISBN: 978-3-258-07092-6

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