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995 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Beyond Biological Ties: Sibilla Aleramo, Maria Montessori, and the Construction of Social Motherhood

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Italian Culture, vol. 32, no. 1

Pages: 32-49

Feminism, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Sibilla Aleramo - Biographic sources

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Abstract/Notes: At the turn of the twentieth century, many Italian intellectuals opposed women’s participation in the public sphere, maintaining that women could not engage in politics due to their exclusive love for their biological children. Contemporary feminists countered this notion by promoting the idea of social motherhood. Sibilla Aleramo and Maria Montessori, better known for their work in feminist literature and early childhood education, respectively, made important contributions to this debate by implementing, theorizing, and popularizing the notion of social motherhood. This essay traces the strategies the two intellectuals used to demonstrate how women could act as political subjects via a socialization of the maternal functions. In her novel Una donna, Aleramo offered a fictional portrait of the social mother. Influenced by it and by the feminist debate on motherhood, Montessori conceptualized the notion of social motherhood as both a socialization of maternal duties and the expansion of women’s maternal virtues into the social world. Montessori also applied this notion to her first pedagogical experiments in San Lorenzo (Rome) and with the orphans of the 1908 Messina-Reggio earthquake. An analysis of these intellectuals’ formerly overlooked contributions provides a new understanding of the role of social motherhood in the contemporary feminist debate in Italy.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1179/0161462213Z.00000000022

ISSN: 0161-4622

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Melts in Your Mind, Not in Your Hand: Using Manipulatives to Teach Social Work Research

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Journal of Teaching in Social Work, vol. 20, no. 1-2

Pages: 159-169

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Abstract/Notes: Research and statistics are a vital part of the social work curriculum. However most social work students have difficulty grasping the basic concepts of these topics for a variety of reasons. Maria Montessori, the noted child psychologist and educator, is credited with formulating the concept of manipulatives: objects that can be used to concretize abstract processes in order to improve learning and retention. This article describes techniques for teaching the principles of hypothesis generation, sampling, statistical regression, and tests of significance (t-test and ANOVA) using small colored candies as manipulatives. Suggestions are provided for stimulating class discussions.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1300/J067v20n01_10

ISSN: 0884-1233

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Open for Business: Learning Economics Through Social Interaction in a Student-Operated Store

Publication: Journal of Social Studies Research, vol. 35, no. 1

Pages: 39-55

Americas, Business education, Economics education, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This study examines teaching and learning economics and entrepreneurship through a student-run Montessori middle school store. By designing and managing a school store, students created a 'community of practice' to learn economics concepts in their daily environment. Questions guiding this study were: (a) How do students' social-interactions in a Montessori middle school student-operated business demonstrate economics content knowledge? (b) How do students' social-interactions in a Montessori middle school student-operated business demonstrate economics skills? (c) How do students' business roles in the store develop their understanding of economics principles? Findings indicate that: (1) student activities in the school store promoted learning through social interaction; (2) the type and number of business roles a student assumed created opportunities for economic learning; (3) student entrepreneurs expressed specific knowledge of economics concepts, and, (4) students' decision-making and ownership affected behavior. Additionally, features of Kohlberg's (1985) concept of Just Community supported the learning environment. This study can provide social studies teachers and teacher-educators with a model for learning economics (or social studies) concepts through a curricular-based student-run enterprise.

Language: English

ISSN: 0885-985X, 2352-2798

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Level of School Readiness of Five-year-olds within the Area of Social Development in View of the Pedagogic Principles of Maria Montessori – an Analysis Report

Available from: INFONA - Portal Komunikacji Naukowej

Publication: Journal of Preschool and Elementary School Education, vol. 4

Pages: 81-97

Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education, Readiness for school, Social development

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Abstract/Notes: Children of kindergarten age develop very quickly. With proper stimuli, they should reach the appropriate level of school readiness around the age of six. The subject of the study carried out in one of Cracow’s kindergartens was to determine the level of school readiness in terms of social development. Tests were carried out among five-year-olds attending a kindergarten based on the pedagogic principles of Maria Montessori. The author wished to know what social skills were developed by the children within the context of an alternative method of interaction. The test group included 22 children from four mixed-age groups. The school readiness evaluation was carried out twice in the school year 2012/13, with the use of the categorised observation technique. The results show that within one year’s time of preparation for school the children made significant progress, but – due to their age and biological development – not all the required skills were shaped at the highest possible level. In the second test only 13.6% children obtained the highest grade in all the test indicators. More than 78% children obtained the high or medium level, which means that the skills tested have not been fully shaped. Children need more time for improving and reinforcing these skills. Social and emotional development is strictly related to the process of growing up. Therefore, certain skills cannot be shaped faster. These include an adequate reaction to new situations, overcoming difficulties, as well as performing and planning tasks on one’s own. The test results confirm that the Montessori educational context faclitates the shaping of such skills as independence of action, making good contacts with adults and peers, or preparing and tidying up the workplace. It was a partial and pilot study.

Language: English

ISSN: 2084-7998

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Using Social Network Analysis to Evaluate Academic Assistance Networks in a Holistic Education Secondary School

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 4, no. 1

Pages: 25-41

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Abstract/Notes: One goal of Erdkinder schools is for students and teachers to provide academic assistance to their peers, particularly to less-knowledgeable ones. However, traditional educational evaluations do not provide a means to investigate the exchange of academic help. This study piloted the use of social network analysis to describe academic assistance relationships within a Montessori secondary school. Using a network survey, social network data concerning the exchange of academic help were collected from 23 students and 8 teachers. The results show that while students provide help to both fellow students and teachers, teachers are the main source of assistance for students. In some subjects, a few students and teachers neither provided nor received assistance, indicating another area for improvement. The results of a multiple regression quadratic assignment procedure (multiple regression-QAP) show that for most subjects, their willingness to help others was not significantly influenced by their own personal level of knowledge. Thus, more-knowledgeable individuals do not provide more assistance to less-knowledgeable peers. To adhere to Erdkinder principles, this school should encourage more-knowledgeable students to recognize their responsibility to help others and to actually help those who need support. This pilot yielded valuable information, and social network analysis warrants further study within holistic education.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v4i1.6639

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Social Justice Education in an Urban Charter Montessori School

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 2, no. 2

Pages: 1-14

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, North America, Public Montessori, Social justice education, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: As the Montessori Method continues its expansion in public education, a social justice lens is needed to analyze its contributions and limitations, given the increase in racial and socioeconomic diversity in the United States. Furthermore, much of the work in Social Justice Education (SJE) focuses on classroom techniques and curriculum, overlooking the essential work of school administrators and parents, whose work significantly influences the school community. The current study applied an SJE framework to the efforts of one urban, socioeconomically and racially integrated Montessori charter school. We examined the extent to which SJE principles were incorporated across the school community, using an inductive, qualitative, case-study approach that included meetings, surveys, focus groups, and interviews. Administrators quickly adopted a system-wide approach, but parents—often color-blind or minimizing of the relevance of race—consistently resisted. Study results imply a continued need for an institutional approach, not solely a classroom or curricular focus, when integrating social justice into Montessori schools.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v2i2.5066

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Effects of Teaching Orientation on Social Interaction in Nursery School

Available from: APA PsycNET

Publication: Journal of Educational Psychology, vol. 68, no. 6

Pages: 725-728

Americas, Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: 53 4- and 5-yr-olds in traditional and Montessori nursery schools were observed for social interaction during free play. The schools differed on teaching orientation and grading but had the same child/adult ratio. Ss in both settings engaged in the same amount of social interaction, but Ss in the Montessori setting had longer mean durations of interactions and more verbal and less nonverbal interaction. Males interacted more than females and adults intervened with males more than with females. Results are discussed as they relate to child/adult ratio and differences across and within settings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)

Language: English

DOI: 10.1037/0022-0663.68.6.725

ISSN: 0022-0663, 1939-2176

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Max: Concern with Social Skills, Language and Excessive TV Viewing in a 3 Year Old

Available from: Lippincott Wolters

Publication: Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, vol. 27, no. 6

Pages: 488–492

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Abstract/Notes: Max is a 3-year-old healthy boy who was brought to the pediatrician's office by his mother for frequent temper tantrums at home. His teachers at the Montessori school are concerned about his communication skills. He is very talkative with his peers, but he constantly speaks about Thomas the Tank Engine. His peers seem to be uninterested in his repetitive stories. His teachers believe that Max has difficulty separating fantasy and reality. At home, his mother describes Max as “difficult to control.” When placed in time-out, he hits, kicks and scratches his mother. He has a large vocabulary, but mostly speaks in phrases directly from cartoons. For example, he repeats a particular phrase from a program in which the main character grows in size with fury every time he gets angry and says, “I hate it, leave me alone.” Before this exposure, the mother reports that her son had never used the word “hate.” Max watches 5 hours of children's programs on television every day; he is not exposed to any news programs. Frequently, he watches the same episode of a program many times. Max's mother believes that he can watch as much TV as he wants as long as it is “good programming,” so he only watches PBS kids shows and the Disney channel.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1097/DBP.0b013e3181d83173

ISSN: 0196-206X

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Current Landscape of US Children’s Television: Violent, Prosocial, Educational, and Fantastical Content

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Journal of Children and Media, vol. 13, no. 3

Pages: 276-294

Children's mass media, Children's television programs, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The present study examined currently popular children’s television shows to determine the prevalence of violent, prosocial, educational, and fantastical content (including fantastical events and anthropomorphism). Network, style, and content ratings were collected for 88 shows using a combination of Common Sense Media and laboratory ratings applied to two randomly-selected episodes of each show. Overall, currently popular children’s television shows were most often animated and contained little violent, prosocial, or educational content, but a great deal of fantastical content. Interrelations among variables were also examined. Shows with fantastical events were both more violent and more prosocial than shows without, and shows with anthropomorphism were more prosocial than shows without. The network on which a show aired predicted violent, prosocial, and educational content, but not fantastical content. Children’s television today is not as violent as might be believed, but nor is it particularly prosocial or educational. It is highly fantastical. The implications of the landscape for children’s behavior, learning, and cognition are discussed.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/17482798.2019.1605916

ISSN: 1748-2798

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Identification of the Social Development in Early Childhood in Pakistan

Available from: Clute Journals

Publication: Journal of College Teaching & Learning, vol. 7, no. 6

Pages: 39-48

Asia, Pakistan, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: This study was conducted to identify the social development in early childhood years. It was delimited to eight private schools of Lahore City from the area of Faisal Town and Shadman. Forty students (male and female) were randomly selected as the sample. Five students from Nursery, Prep and grade one were selected from each school. A checklist was developed by reviewing the related literature which covered attributes of social developments under the sections of individual, social skills, peer relationships and communication skills. It was revealed that individual, social skills, peer relationships and communication skills were developed in the children but a positive mood was lacking in them at this stage.

Language: English

DOI: 10.19030/tlc.v7i6.129

ISSN: 1544-0389, 2157-894X

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