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Article

AMS Teacher Education Scholarships

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 28, no. 3

Pages: 25-26

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Applications-typically about 100 per cycle-are reviewed by a small AMS selection committee, under the leadership of the chair of the Teachers Section of the AMS Board of Directors-currently Suzanne Bayer.Since the scholarship program began in 1993, AMS has awarded over $587,000 to more than 300 aspiring teachers.Sarah Chase (Early Childhood), Northeast Montessori Institute, Wenham, MA **Cristal Garza (Early Childhood), Montessori Teacher Academy, Dana Point, CA *Abigail Goeller (Early Childhood), Adrian Dominican Montessori Teacher Education Institute, Adrian, MI Elizabeth Hill (Elementary I-II), Institute for Montessori Innovation at Westminster College, Salt Lake City, UT Lisa Huff (Early Childhood), Greater Cincinnati Center for Montessori Education, Covington, KY *Ada Kulbickaite (Elementary III), Duhovka Montessori Teacher Education Program, Prague 6, Czech Republic Estefanía Maldonada (Early Childhood), Palm Harbor Montessori Teacher Education Center, Palm Harbor, FL *Jessica Marshall (Elementary I), Montessori Education Center of the Rockies, Boulder, CO Erin Mergil (Early Childhood), Center for Montessori Education I NY, New Rochelle, NY Shawnnee Miranda (Early Childhood), New England Montessori Teacher Education Center, Newton, MA *Rebekah Moore (Early Childhood), Greater Cincinnati Center for Montessori Education, Covington, KY Leah Park (Elementary I), Institute for Advanced Montessori Studies, Silver Spring, MD Misty Pasco (Infant and Toddler), Mid-America Montessori Teacher Training Institute, Omaha, NE *Stephanie Powell (Early Childhood), Montessori Center for Teacher Education, San Diego, CA *Kimberly Torres (Elementary I-II), Institute for Montessori Innovation at Westminster College, Salt Lake City, UT Mariah White (Elementary I), University of Wisconsin-River Falls Montessori Teacher Education Program, River Falls, WI Ashley Wooten (Early Childhood), Shelton Montessori Teacher Education Center, Dallas, TX Marah Zabibi (Early Childhood), Hope Montessori Educational Institute, Lake Saint Louis, MO *Scholarships partially funded from the Zell Family Scholarship Fund **Scholarship funded by the Joanne P. Hammes Scholarship Fund Scholarships were drawn from three sources, all administered by AMS: the AMS Living Legacy Scholarship Fund, for which monies were raised in honor of the 2016 Living Legacy, Carolyn Kambich; the Zell Family Scholarship Fund, established by Dr. Pamela Zell Rigg to honor the memory of her late mother, Agnes Kister, and her late brother, John Kister Zell; and the Joanne P. Hammes Scholarship Fund, established by an anonymous donor to honor Ms. Hammes' lifelong work as a Montessori educator.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

School Accreditation News

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 28, no. 2

Pages: 19

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Abstract/Notes: AMS accreditation is a designation that an AMS member school meets a well-defined standard of excellence.AMARE MONTESSORI (SATELLITE OF MONTESSORI ACADEMY) (Initial Accreditation) Clarksville, TN Jaime Yeager, Head of School BRIXHAM MONTESSORI FRIENDS SCHOOL (Initial Accreditation) York, ME Alica B. Johnson-Grafe, Head of School CHILDREN'S TREE MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Initial Accreditation) Old Saybrook, Connecticut Marci Martindale, Head of School COUNTRYSIDE MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) Charlotte, NC Dolores Murgolo, Interim Head of School HILL COUNTRY MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) Boerne, TX Steven Whewell, Head of School KENNEBEC MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Reaccreditation) Fairfield, ME Rebecca Green, Head of School MONTESSORI ACADEMY (Addition of an Accredited Infant Program) Brentwood, TN James R. Bernstorf, Head of School MONTESSORI ACADEMY OF ARLINGTON (Addition of an Accredited Infant Program) Arlington, TX Pamela Dunbar, Head of School MONTESSORI SCHOOL OF MCLEAN (Addition of an Accredited Toddler program) McLean, VA Meredith Wood & Thomas Le Grand, Heads of School MONTESSORI SCHOOL OF WAUKESHA (Initial Accreditation) Waukesha, WI William R. Walsh, Executive Director MONTESSORI SCHOOL OF WESTMINSTER (Initial Accreditation) Westminster, MD Jodi Lupco, Head of School SHINING STARS MONTESSORI SCHOOL (Initial Accreditation: Early Childhood and Lower Elementary levels) Washington, DC Regina Rodriguez, Executive Director

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Parent Education: Home Responsibilities of the Child

Publication: AMI Elementary Alumni Association Newsletter, vol. 11, no. 1

Pages: insert

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Language: English

Conference Paper

Positive Socialization in an Educational Inclusion Group of a Montessori Elementary School

Available from: IATED Digital Library

8th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of the present work was to foster positive socialization in a multilevel group of a Montessori elementary school comprised by 20 students between 9 and 12 years old and many students with Special Education Needs. Positive socialization refers to the group of behaviors to aid the more vulnerable and concern for the others (Rudolph, 2000). It is important to nurture these behaviors during the school age since this is the stage where students require them to foster healthy coexistence and cooperation, as well as respect for differences and diversity among peers, which is closely related to educational inclusion, which premise is to make a school for all, for which the creation of spaces where coexistence and differences acceptance are nurtured taking into account the needs of each student (Romera, 2008). The Elementary Education Syllabus in Mexico mentions the inclusion principle, which emphasizes the teaching of values, attitudes and behaviors towards helping the others (Secretary of Public Education, 2011). Under this perspective, a traditional empirical quantitative applied field study was conducted. The design was of only one group, with two pretest-posttest measurings in which also 5 teachers participated in the group activities. The group was assessed in Positive socialization by means of the Socialization Battery BAS-3 by Silva and Martorell (1987) which defines a child’s profile by five factors. The pretest results indicated five subjects obtained a scoring below the mean value in the Concern for the others scale, this meant the subjects had little social sensitivity or concern for others. In addition, the Inclusive Practices in the Classroom Evaluation Guideline in its observation and self-report version by Garcia, Romero and Escalante (2009) was applied, which allowed to measure the levels of educational inclusion in the group. The results determined that four teachers obtained a scoring below the mean value in the planning area scale. Based on the pretest results obtained from both instruments, an intervention program was designed based on the Cooperative play proposal by Garaigordobil (2004), to foster prosocial behaviors, while the decision taking according to the students’ needs were worked with the teachers. At the end of the intervention, a posttest was applied to the group and the results indicated a significant increment in the positive socialization, especially, the behaviors towards helping the others in the students with the lowest scores from the pretest; teachers planning also improved to achieve a more inclusive environment in the group. The results were validated with the non-parametric Wilcoxon test using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software.

Language: English

Published: Barcelona, Spain: International Academy of Technology, Education and Development (IATED), 2016

Pages: 7934-7941

DOI: 10.21125/edulearn.2016.0741

ISBN: 978-84-608-8860-4

Article

School Gardening in Early Childhood Education in Oman: A Pilot Project with Grade 2 Students

Available from: International Council of Associations for Science Education (ICASE)

Publication: Science Education International, vol. 30, no. 1

Pages: 45-55

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Abstract/Notes: While school gardens are familiar in many Western contexts and research has reported significant pedagogical and affective benefits of these resources, there is limited reporting of their use in non-Western contexts. A pilot school gardening project involving a quasi-experimental mixed method design was undertaken in the Sultanate of Oman with several Grade 2 and Grade 7 classes to determine if this resource might provide benefits in this particular context. This paper reports on the findings for the Grade 2 cohort. While these findings were somewhat mixed and need to be treated tentatively given that the study was a pilot, they did suggest that school gardens in Oman could provide affective and possibly health benefits for students. The potential health benefits could be particularly significant because the Omani population is beginning to exhibit a rapid increase in “lifestyle diseasesâ€, most notably diabetes and cardiovascular illnesses. These illnesses appear to be linked to poor dietary habits and a more sedentary lifestyle among the younger generation.

Language: English

ISSN: 2077-2327

Doctoral Dissertation

Executive Function, Social-Emotional Skills, and Academic Competence in Three Preschool Programmes: Pathways to School Readiness

Available from: British Librarty - EthOS

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Abstract/Notes: Research findings indicate that executive function (EF), social-emotional skills, and pre-academic competence significantly promote children's school readiness and later success. School readiness broadly refers to a combination of skills necessary to function successfully in school and lack thereof may increase the risk of children's school problems. Therefore, it is essential for school systems to provide appropriate and timely support to the development of these fundamental skills. The present study focused on three particular preschool programmes: Montessori, Reggio Emilia, and the traditional play-based (British Columbia Early Learning Framework: BCEFL) programmes in Western Canada. Although they are popular, there is little empirical research that examines and compares the benefits of these programmes to the development of school readiness skills. As such, the present study aimed to 1) determine the effectiveness of these three preschool programmes in Western Canada on the development of children's school readiness; and 2) examine other sources of influences in the child, family and school in relation to the development of school readiness skills. Overall, 119 preschool children (48 Montessori, 42 Reggio Emilia, 29 BCELF) participated in the study. Observation was conducted once in the autumn of 2015 for each classroom using the CLASS observation tool. Teachers and parents of participating children filled in a series of questionnaires regarding the quality of their relationship with their child and their perceptions of daily EF and social-emotional skills of their child. The researcher also assessed individual children's fluid intelligence, EF, and pre-academic competence. The results showed that 1) although Montessori education appeared to be the most effective in facilitating numeracy skills, no curriculum stood out as notably more effective than any of the others at improving other areas of school readiness skills; 2) well-run classrooms where teachers were effective in time, behavioural, and attention management were most effective in promoting children's numeracy skills; 3) EF, social-emotional skills, and pre-academic competence exhibited an overlapping developmental process over time; 4) relational quality in both home and school environments significantly affected the development of school readiness skills, especially social-emotional skills; and 5) adults' perceptions of children's EF and social-emotional skills had a significant consequence for how teachers and parents formed their relationships with their children.

Language: English

Published: Oxford, England, 2018

Archival Material Or Collection

E. M. Standing Collection on the Montessori Method, 1895-1980

Available from: Seattle University Library

Asia, Edwin Mortimer Standing - Biographic sources, Edwin Mortimer Standing - Writings, India, Montessori method of education, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Edwin Mortimer Standing (1887-1967) was the primary compiler of this collection that became the basis for the Montessori Teacher Training Program at Seattle University from 1968 to 1986. William J. Codd, SJ was the first director of the program. The collection contains correspondence, lecture notes, manuscripts, essays, speech texts, photographs, files, clippings, ephemera, sound recordings and publications. Materials document the educational philosophy of Maria Montessori as seen through the writings and correspondence of E.M. Standing and reflect the growing interest in Maria Montessori's teachings and pedagogy from Europe and South Asia to the United States in the 1920s. Also documented is the historical development and establishment of Montessori-based schools and teacher training programs in Seattle, WA and the greater Pacific Northwest and western United States. The collection includes early administrative records and correspondence pertaining to the formation of Seattle University's Montessori Teacher Training Program. The bulk of the materials in this collection are from circa 1939 to 1970. The collection is primarily in English, with some material in Italian, French, Spanish, and Latin. The folder numbering sequence shown in the finding aid is not reproduced on the folders themselves. Series I: Correspondence - Includes incoming and outgoing general and subject correspondence primarily between Edwin Mortimer Standing (circa 1919-1967) and William J. Codd, S.J. (circa 1958-1980) and encompassing a wide variety of friends and associates. Correspondents include Mario Montessori (Maria's son), A.M. Joosten, Phyllis Wallbank, and Lady Carmen Bazely. Other correspondence relates to issues involving publishing royalty, reprint and citations between E.M. Standing, Fr. Codd (Standing’s literary executor) and various publishers. A portion of corrrespondence is between Mr. Standing and Donald Demarest, Academy Guild Press publisher (circa 1959-1962). The correspondence within this series is arranged chronologically by year. Series II: Literary Productions - Includes notes, drafts, essays, plays, poems and manuscripts primarily written by Standing. The series contains manuscript drafts of various religious and educational essays and draft chapters from two of Standing’s books, The Montessori Method and The Child in The Church. Also included within this series is Indian Twilight which is an unpublished 4-volume chronicle of Standing’s years as a Montessori tutor for the Saharabai family in India (circa 1920-1925). Included are reprints of Standing’s letters documenting his experiences, photographs of the people and architecture of India before its independence from England; and brief references to conversations with Mahatma Gandhi who was a close friend and neighbor of the Saharabai family. The items within this series are arranged by sub-series, by author and in chronological order. Series III: Lecture Transcripts - Includes transcripts of speeches given by Maria Montessori in London prior to World War Two. Documents are in Italian and English and are arranged chronologically as well as by lecturer. Series IV: Subject Files - Includes transcripts of speeches given by Maria Montessori in London prior to World War Two. Documents are in Italian and English and are arranged chronologically as well as by lecturer. Series V: Legal and Financial Documents - Documents within this series include publisher contracts, royalty statements, insurance policies, Standing’s will and passport Series VI: Datebooks and Address Books; Series VII: Article and Clipping Files - Includes copies of published articles written by Standing, Fr. Codd and their associates as well as news clippings of interest to Standing and Fr. Codd. Series VIII: Photographic Material - This series includes black and white original photographs of Maria Montessori and classroom activity in early Montessori schools. Also included in this series are early glass plate negatives depicting Montessori school scenes. The bulk of the materials within this series are uncredited and undated. Series IX: Religious, Instructional and General Ephemera; Series X: Sound Recordings; Series XI: Educational Pamphlets and Monographic Materials

Language: English, Italian, French, Spanish, Latin

Extent: 19.5 linear feet, (18 boxes and 1 oversized box)

Archive: Seattle University, Lemieux Library and McGoldrick Learning Commons, Special Collections (Seattle, Washington)

Article

La donna che inventó un nido speciale

Publication: Insieme: il giornale della tua famiglia, vol. 13, no. 3

Pages: 180-188

Europe, Fascism, France, Legion d'Onore, Montessori method of education, Western Europe, Parigi, Western Europe

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Language: Italian

ISSN: 1120-4427

Article

One Year's Experiment in Self-Activity at a New School in Switzerland

Available from: Internet Archive

Publication: New Era, vol. 5

Pages: 88-90

Europe, Switzerland, Western Europe

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Language: English

ISSN: 1087-1195

Book Section

Montessori with Culturally Disadvantaged: A Cognitive-Developmental Interpretation of Some Research Findings

Book Title: Montessori Schools in America: Historical, Philosophical, and Empirical Research Perspectives

Pages: 169-180

African American community, Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: This article was originally published as an entry in Early Education, eds. R. D. Hess and R. M. Bear (Chicago: Aldine, 1968), p. 105-118.

Language: English

Published: Lexington, Massachusetts: Ginn Custom Pub., 1983

Edition: 2nd ed.

ISBN: 0-536-04367-1

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