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587 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The History of Base-Ten-Blocks: Why and Who Made Base-Ten-Blocks?

Available from: Mediterranean Center of Social and Educational Research (MCSER)

Publication: Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences, vol. 5, no. 9

Pages: 356-365

Mathematics education, Montessori materials

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study is to present evidence of how base-ten-blocks have been developed and emphasized as a tool for learning in mathematics education. After an introduction of the theme, we discuss the theoretical and epistemological perspectives that provide the basis for our analysis of the literature. Then, we illustrate how base-ten-blocks have historically been associated with the numeral concepts from the prehistoric era to today. We also review studies about different manipulatives that focus on numerical concepts (e.g., Cuisenaire rods). This discussion will broaden our understanding regarding how perspectives toward mathematics instruction have changed with the introduction of base-ten-blocks. The intent was not to understand the process of developing base-ten-blocks but rather to suggest that teachers must consider the underlying mathematical concepts and structures of base-ten-blocks when they use them. In summary, this study revealed that base-ten-blocks as concrete materials seems to have been presented as different isomorphic numeral concepts for various educational purposes throughout its developmental process. DOI: 10.5901/mjss.2014.v5n9p356

Language: English

DOI: 10.5901/mjss.2014.v5n9p356

ISSN: 2039-2117

Article

Polishing the Penny

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 27, no. 2

Pages: 60

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Performing the ritual of polishing pennies (as with many other Practical Life activities) allows the child to relax, to focus on a process with a clear, concrete outcome, and to experience a sense of satisfaction and accomplishment.If you came to my school and asked me what children do in a Montessori classroom, the last thing you'd probably want to hear is, "I'm sure we can find some pennies for your son or daughter to polish" Let me assure you, though, that these activities are the key to a successful classroom.If your child seems uninterested in work in the Math and Language areas, at the next parent-teacher conference, maybe you should ask, "Are you sure he (or she) has been doing enough polishing?"

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Dear Mammolina: Uh . . . Some Things Have, um, Changed in 60 Years

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 23, no. 1

Pages: 24-27

Public Montessori

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Abstract/Notes: "In the September 2010 issue of 'Astronomy Magazine', Chris Impey writes a 'Letter to Galileo' – visualizaing a scenario where Galileo is in the present and wants to know what astronomers have been doing for the last 400 years. We adopted his style to have a similar meeting with Maria Montessori'

Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Educating for Ecological Sustainability: Montessori Education Leads the Way

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 21, no. 4

Pages: 18-25

Sustainability, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: These days, the word "green," and the more comprehensive term "sustainability," surface in numerous arenas, whether it be exhortations to recycle more, employ compact fluorescent lightbulbs, use less hot water, avoid products with excess packaging, adjust thermostats, plant trees, turn off electronic devices when not in use, or buy organic and local food. This article discusses what Montessorians are doing at an even deeper and more fundamental level to cultivate sustainability. Montessori students not only read and write and compute, they have a broad knowledge base upon which to become lifelong learners who respect self, others, and the environment. Ecological sustainability principles and authentic Montessori practices present new paradigms for living in this world, stimulating critical and creative thinking through content and process. Ecological sustainability and Montessori principles follow approaches that are holistic and systems oriented, attuned to living in harmony with the earth. They share a vision that recognizes humans as living beings and part of nature, comprising one web on one planet in a vast universe of profound mystery. Ultimately, both present a way of living--and establish a necessary, new way of thinking.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Fort Play: Children Recreate Recess

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 19, no. 3

Pages: 20-30

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Recess beckons well before it actually arrives. Its allure can be heard in children's lunchtime conversations as they discuss imaginary roles, plans, alliances and teams, with an obvious appetite for play and its unbounded possibility. For some children, recess provides the most important reasons to come to school. In team sports, games of chase and tag, clique-bound conversations, solitary wandering and exploration, pretend and war play, recess offers reliable access to a scarce resource of immense value in the lives of children: spontaneous self-direction. Although watched over by the protective though generally unobtrusive gaze of supervising teachers, children at recess interact with their natural environment and with each other as they choose--a freedom denied them at other times while at school, and increasingly in their homes and neighborhood. As a lower elementary teacher at Lexington Montessori School (LMS) in Lexington, MA, from 1994 through 2002, the author witnessed for eight years the development of an extraordinary child-centered and spontaneous world of recess play (Powell, 2007). As children entered the elementary program at LMS, their peers initiated them into a culture of fort building. The forts, built entirely from sticks, leaves, and found objects from the surrounding woods, were the sites of considerable experimentation with different forms and rules of social organization and various styles of construction. They were also the vehicles for much of the conflict that occurred at the school. Children negotiated and clashed over ownership of land and resources and argued about the rules and roles of fort play and whether the rights of those already identified with a structure outweighed the rights of outsiders to be included. In doing so, they developed and influenced each other's reasoning about such moral principles as benevolence, justice, and reciprocity. Fort play was unpredictable, immediate, exciting, and fun, a brief window of opportunity,among hours of mostly adult-inspired activities and expectations, in which these children were free to manage their own lives and interact with each other on their own terms. As in the case of other schools where fort play has flourished, the LMS forts were in no way a programmed activity but rather a spontaneous one that simply wasn't stopped.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

The Need for Precision

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 24, no. 2

Pages: 28-29

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: People have become accustomed to the imprecision of language, though imprecise language has a subtle way of misguiding thoughts and actions. In this article, the author argues that the term "teacher" in reference to the Montessori practitioner is a distortion of everything Maria Montessori tried to undo about traditional education. In dealing with words and language precisely, one can arrive at all the rich connotations of the word "Montessorian." By so doing, the mind then possesses, with clarity and purpose, a greater understanding of one's role in the profession and in the classroom. Thus, by virtue of this clarity, Montessori teachers understand that their work is "not" a method, but a methodology; Montessori teachers remind themselves that their work is "science-based"; that as they respond to children's needs and their development, Montessori teachers can take pride as "professionals"; and that in their precise words of explanation to parents and the public, Montessori teachers do credit and service to the Montessori movement. Thus, the author contends that with precise language, with constant striving to refine methodologies, and with adherence to the highest standards of ethics, more and more children of the world will become beneficiaries of the rich meaning and vision that the words "Montessori" and "Montessorian" represent.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Yoga For Montessorians

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 26, no. 3

Pages: 50-54

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: When the author tells someone who does not do yoga that she is a yoga teacher, she often hears that they could not possibly do yoga. The most common reasons they give for this are: "I am really not flexible! I really don't like stretching!" and "Oh, but I wouldn't be any good at yoga!" Smith explains that, contrary to popular belief, yoga is not actually about being flexible; yoga is about learning to be one's healthiest, calmest, wisest, most free, strongest, and best possible self. Yoga, a Sanskrit word often translated as "union," aims to unify all aspects of one's being, and, by doing so, to help each of us know our true self. The work done in the Montessori classroom is very physical, there is constant motion, and because of this, many Montessori teachers suffer from knee, ankle, and lower-back problems. And yet, even a very basic physical yoga practice can help them learn to sit, stand, and kneel in a way that decreases the likelihood of long-term injury and pain. If someone would like to give yoga a try, this article presents a short practice intended for beginners. Practice can begin using the pictures provided herein, however, nothing can replace taking class with a live instructor.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Joy in the Montessori Classroom

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 26, no. 3

Pages: 44-45

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: In this article, the author states that it is a delight to walk into a Montessori classroom to the hum of children engaged in a variety of activities, especially when there is an accompanying feeling of joy and happiness. In desiring the peaceful calm of the classroom, educators may inadvertently hinder the joy, enthusiasm, and imagination that are not only a part of childhood but something adults also would benefit from cultivating within themselves. Ulrich says that if one could step into the sparkly light-up sneakers of a 3-year-old, they would discover what a fascinating place the world is and that it is it is hard not to be excited! Educators are asked to step back for a moment to consider the perspective of the child--to consider allowing joy, enthusiasm, and imagination to be spontaneously expressed, while still maintaining the peace of the classroom. Gently, with joy, imagination, and creativity, as well as a large dose of humor, educators should embrace whatever life is delivering into the classroom and use it to flow right back into peace. In so doing, educators create a classroom where children and adults work together to maintain harmony and peacefulness.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

'Going Out' in the Upper Elementary Classroom

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 28, no. 1

Pages: 38-43

Upper elementary, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: [...]let us present him with the world" (Montessori, 2007, p. 20). [...]we decided that doing one educational trip and one service project each semester would fit well into the larger school-wide schedule and give enough time for meeting and planning. At our school, we walk our whole Upper Elementary class to the library every other month and to a nearby park for PE class every week, but given safety and liability concerns, adults must always supervise these and any other excursions, including Going Out trips. [...]when planning Going Out trips, we must think of other ways to allow freedom and responsibility, so as to enable students to gain knowledge and skills to navigate the outside world. [...]after the trips, we ensured that the children wrote thank-you notes to the people who hosted them on their excursions as well as to the chaperones who accompanied them.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Primer Congreso Pedagógico Nacional Colombiano de 1917. Una mirada a sus tensiones y avances [First National Pedagogical Congress of Colombia in 1917. A Glimpse into its Tensions and Breakthroughs / Primeiro Congresso Pedagógico Nacional colombiano de 1917. Uma olhada às suas tensões e avanços]

Available from: Universidad Pedagogica Nacional (Colombia)

Publication: Pedagogía y Saberes, no. 48

Pages: 153-161

Americas, Colombia, Latin America and the Caribbean, Montessori method of education, South America

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Abstract/Notes: El presente artículo recoge, en retrospectiva, la experiencia del Primer Congreso Pedagógico Nacional realizado en Colombia en 1917. Se ubican cuatro tensiones fundamentales: el manejo de las escuelas normales, los métodos de enseñanza, los textos y los programas escolares y, por último, las tensiones entre dos formas de pedagogía, la conservadora y la liberal. Además, se señala como uno de los avances principales la creación, en marzo de 1927, del Instituto Pedagógico Nacional, que al trasegar por el método Montessori y fomentar los principios de la escuela activa contribuyó a la modernización de la pedagogía en el país y, hacia mediados de siglo xx, la conformación de la Universidad Pedagógica Nacional (UPN). [This article takes a retrospective look at the experience from the First National Pedagogical Congress that took place in Colombia in 1917. Four fundamental tensions are identified: the management of normal schools, the teaching methods, the school texts and programs and, finally, the strains between two ways of pedagogical thinking, the conservative and the liberal. Furthermore, the creation of the National Pedagogical Institute in March 1927 is seen as one of the main breakthroughs that, by changing to the Montessori’s method and encouraging the progressive education’s principles, contributed to the pedagogical modernization of the country and, by mid-twentieth century, to the establishment of the National Pedagogical University (UPN). / Este artigo recolhe, em retrospectiva, a experiência do Primeiro Congresso Pedagógico Nacional realizado na Colômbia em 1917. Relacionam-se quatro tensões fundamentais: o gerenciamento das Escolas Normais, os métodos de ensino, os textos e os programas escolares e, por último, as tensões entre dois tipos de pedagogia, o conservador e o liberal. Além disso, como um dos avanços principais assinala-se a criação do Instituto Pedagógico Nacional, em março de 1927, que ao trasfegar pelo Método Montessori e fomentar os princípios da escola ativa, contribuiu à modernização da pedagogia no país e, por volta de meados do século xx, à conformação da Universidade Pedagógica Nacional (UPN).]

Language: Spanish

DOI: 10.17227/pys.num48-7380

ISSN: 2500-6436

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