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490 results

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

The Montessori Bibliography Online: A Resource for the Global Montessori Community

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 8, no. 1

Pages: 1-12

Bibliographies

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Abstract/Notes: The Montessori Bibliography Online (MBO) makes information about Montessori education and the Montessori movement more accessible through an online interface that includes links to digitized source materials. Historically, Montessori bibliographies and indexes have been published in physical form and include references to other sources, but a direct link is absent. This database builds on previously compiled indexes to consolidate citations into a comprehensive repository with an intuitive user interface and a robust search capability. Additionally, the MBO provides hyperlinks to digitized source material. Although this type of tool is not unprecedented in the larger research and educational landscape, it is novel within the domain of Montessori education. This methodological essay discusses the steps I took to compile and develop the MBO. Beginning with a review of the literature and legal matters, the discussion describes the methods and processes employed. It concludes by outlining future directions for the MBO. The MBO is accessible at https://montessoribib.ku.edu.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v8i1.16425

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Moral Beginnings: The Just Community in Montessori Pre‐Schools

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Journal of Moral Education, vol. 11, no. 1

Pages: 41-46

Ethics, Grace and courtesy, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: Kohlberg's concept of a just community has been instituted, in varying degrees and at various levels, from the early elementary years upward. It is argued here that, although pre‐school children are developmentally unprepared for the in‐depth classroom discussions and reasoning called for by Kohlbergian theory, they are nevertheless capable of creating a just community in simplified, or embryonic, form. It is further argued that this pre‐school concept has been in existence since Maria Montessori established her first Children's House. A comparison of the Kohlberg and Montessori models is made showing their compatibility in both theory and practice. Further analysis shows that developmentally the two work well as a sequence for children's moral growth.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/0305724810110104

ISSN: 0305-7240

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Maintaining an Empowered School Community: Introducing Digital Technologies by Building Digital Literacies at Beehive Montessori School

Available from: UCL Open Environment

Publication: London Review of Education, vol. 18, no. 3

Pages: 356-372

Australasia, Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Montessori schools, Oceania

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Abstract/Notes: In 2019, educators at Beehive Montessori School (Beehive) in Western Australia implemented their self-defined digital literacies framework. The framework guided their approach to, and use of, digital technologies in their classrooms. Doing so came out of a whole school action research project in which the school became a hub for inquiry and educators, and researchers worked together to identify issues and develop improvement processes. At the project conclusion, the educators and researchers had collaboratively defined a solution that met the mandated curriculum needs and fitted with the school autonomy. Most importantly the project and the solution empowered educators, as it aligned with the school-identified virtues and utilized the three-period lesson to teach it, all of which was consistent with Montessori pedagogy.

Language: English

DOI: 10.14324/LRE.18.3.03

ISSN: 1474-8460

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

From Holland to Hamburg: The Experimental and Community Schools of Hamburg Seen Through the Eyes of Dutch Observers (1919–1933)

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Paedagogica Historica: International Journal of the History of Education, vol. 50, no. 5

Pages: 615-630

Europe, Germany, Holland, Netherlands, New Education Fellowship, New Education Movement, Theosophical Society, Theosophy, Western Europe

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Abstract/Notes: In the period 1919–1933 the experimental and community schools in Hamburg tried to put into practice a new model of schooling without a set curriculum that was based on providing a considerable amount of freedom for pupils and teachers. These experiences were introduced in the Netherlands by way of magazines published by the New Education Fellowship (NEF) or Dutch journals edited by educationalists and university professors. The Hamburg schools were also visited by Christian Anarchist teachers who were connected with new schools in the Netherlands and who already had experimented with new ways of life in small communities. In this article we describe their experiences in Hamburg. Their observation reports would not trigger a growing interest in a social community type of schooling; in general Dutch teachers, even the socialist ones, did not change their preference for the traditional classroom system of education. More individualistic methods from Montessori and Parkhurst (Dalton Plan), supported by university professors and inspectors of education, were considered to have more potential for changing the classroom system from within.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/00309230.2014.927513

ISSN: 0030-9230, 1477-674X

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Nurturing a Democratic Community in the Classroom

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: Studies in Philosophy and Education, vol. 30, no. 5

Pages: 491-497

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Abstract/Notes: Thayer-Bacon tells her story in a conversational tone that traces her personal and professional roots as she describes various chapters of her life: first as a philosopher, how she became involved in education, and then how that involvement became a career as a philosopher of education, in a large teacher education program, and now at a research institution. She sketches her philosophical contributions, as a pragmatist, feminist, postmodernist, and cultural studies scholar, to philosophy, philosophy of education, and education.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s11217-011-9241-z

ISSN: 1573-191X, 0039-3746

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Community Action Plans for Social Justice Advocacy: Leveraging the Relationship Between Awareness and Action

Available from: Wiley Online Library

Publication: TESOL Journal, vol. 11, no. 4

Pages: e552

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Abstract/Notes: Supporting multilingual learners’ access to equitable and socially just language education requires more from teachers than a critical stance and language awareness. Teachers of multilingual students must understand how their awareness and ideologies drive their actions and how their actions can generate new awareness both inside the classroom in pedagogical choices and outside the classroom in interactions with families and community partners. To aid teachers in moving through cycles of applying awareness to action, the authors designed the Community Action Plan (CAP) assignment for a family and community engagement course. This article outlines the components of the course curriculum and the conceptual framework that guided its design. The authors also provide a case study of how one novice teacher, Katrina (co-author), navigated the curriculum. They offer suggestions for how language teacher educators might guide in-service and preservice teachers to implement CAPs of various types to promote socially just language education for and with K–12 learners.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1002/tesj.552

ISSN: 1949-3533

Article

Fostering Community through 'Brother-Sister' Relationships in the 6-9 Classroom

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 19, no. 3

Pages: 20

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Evaluating Student Food Selections After a Nutrition Education Intervention in a Montessori Community School

Available from: The Annals of Family Medicine

Publication: The Annals of Family Medicine, vol. 20, no. Supplement 1

Pages: Submission 3129

Montessori schools, Nutrition education

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Abstract/Notes: Context: Schools are unique sites for nutrition education interventions due to their ability to provide educational activities as well as meals, allowing for observation of behavior change. Nutrition education and physical activity awareness programs implemented in the school setting have the potential to positively impact students’ eating habits. Eating habits are developed at a young age, but few efforts have been made to deliver and assess education interventions in the pre-K through grade 3 age group. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate student food selections before and after a nutrition education intervention was implemented in a Montessori school. Human Subjects Review: Approved as non-regulated research by the UTSW IRB. Study Design: Retrospective exploratory analysis. Setting: A single Montessori community school with students in grades pre-K through grade 3. Instrument: Aggregate lunch food selection data, including total food items offered and total food items left over, via daily production records. Main Outcome Measures: Records were collected from three school years to compare the food acceptability – the percent of food item taken from the total offered - of fruit (F), vegetable (V), F&V, 0% milk, 1% milk, and all milks before and after the implementation of the intervention program. Food acceptability served as a proxy for food consumption. Results: In all years, fruit (82.88%) and all milks (81.74%) were well accepted by students, but vegetables (62.00%) were not. The study found that from year 1 to year 2, there were statistically significant (p <0.0001) decreases in intake in all categories. This trend continued when comparing year 1 to year 3. Conclusions: Prior studies show that even in successful interventions, when vegetable or F&V intake does increase, changes are minimal. These findings corroborate the difficulties prior studies have demonstrated in changing students’ food selections for the better, particularly regarding vegetable consumption. This analysis of production records showed a decline in acceptability of foods over the three years. It is unclear if these changes are directly related to the instructional program, due to the presence of confounding factors. Future studies should attempt to reevaluate nutrition education and subsequently conduct a plate-waste study for a more accurate representation of food consumption before and after an intervention.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1370/afm.20.s1.3129

ISSN: 1544-1709, 1544-1717

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

Focusing on Grace and Courtesy in the Hopes of Achieving a More Peaceful Classroom Community

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: Children are at risk of becoming adults who are unable to live, work and thrive together within communities across the United States of America due to lack of respect for themselves, other humans and things in the world which goes along with social courtesies. The researcher was an early childhood education teacher who holds a Montessori certification. For six weeks, the participants in the study were able to focus on Grace and Courtesy lessons in which they participated by observing the teacher modeling care of self, care of others, and care of things with careful attention with, mindful movement, and language. The researcher used pre and post-questionnaires, observations, and questions prepared by the researcher to measure the impact of the Grace and Courtesy lessons. The intervention findings show that focusing on Grace and Courtesy led to a more peaceful learning community. Future research could focus more on the language that promotes a socially respectful environment, a more extended intervention period, and other data collection forms.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2022

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Personalized and Community Pedagogy in Mexico: The First Summer Course in Guadalajara (1975)

Available from: EDUFU - Editora da Universidade Federal de Uberlândia

Publication: Cadernos de História da Educação, vol. 21

Pages: Article 114

Americas, Central America, Latin America and the Caribbean, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Mexico, Pierre Faure - Biographic sources

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Abstract/Notes: This article aims to understand the first summer course animated by the French Jesuit Father Pierre Faure, which took place in mid-1975, in the city of Guadalajara, Mexico. Initially, it contextualizes the circulation of personalized and community pedagogy as proposed by Pierre Faure in Latin America, particularly in Mexico. The text focuses on the main pedagogic aspects explored by Faure in his lectures, which are the core of this course. In the light of Marta Carvalho’s historiographic perspective, the summer course is regarded as a strategy for the circulation of personalized and community pedagogy. The 1975 summer course was remarkable due to Father Faure’s pioneering presence in Guadalajara, which attracted educators from Mexico and other countries. / Este artículo tiene como objetivo comprender el primer curso de verano animado por el padre jesuita francés Pierre Faure, que tuvo lugar a mediados de 1975, en la ciudad de Guadalajara, México. Inicialmente, se contextualiza la circulación de la pedagogía personalizada y comunitaria propuesta por Pierre Faure en América Latina, particularmente en México. El texto se centra en los principales aspectos pedagógicos explorados por Faure en sus conferencias, que son el núcleo de este curso. A la luz de la perspectiva historiográfica de Marta Carvalho, el curso de verano se considera una estrategia para la circulación de la pedagogía personalizada y comunitaria. El curso de verano de 1975 fue notable debido a la presencia pionera del padre Faure en Guadalajara, que atrajo a educadores de México y de otros países.

Language: English, Portuguese

DOI: 10.14393/che-v21-2022-114

ISSN: 1982-7806

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