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304 results

Article

Flow and Evolution

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 22, no. 2

Pages: 36-58

Attention, Attention in children, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi - Writings

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Abstract/Notes: Discusses how human evolution affects the achievement of flow experiences, including the role of complexity, or people's need to take on a greater range of challenges and opportunities to increase their skill level. Describes evolutionary obstacles to complexity, such as genetic instructions to conserve energy, and ways to overcome these obstacles. Includes answers to sample questions. (EV)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

The Mathematical Intelligence Seen Through the Lens of the Montessori Theory of the Human Tendencies

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 21, no. 2

Pages: 98-107

Cognitive development, Early childhood education, Kay M. Baker - Writings, Mathematics - Achievement, Montessori method of education, Multiple intelligences, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Contextualizes the mathematical intelligence as revealed in the human tendencies, as supported by the extended family, and facilitated by choice within a responsive environment. Reviews the function of Montessori materials, including mathematical materials, and emphasizes that the personal intelligences are integral to all activities simply because the Montessori classroom is a community of children.

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Report

Report of a Research and Demonstration Project for Culturally Disadvantaged Children in the Ancona Montessori School

Available from: ERIC

Academic achievement, Classroom environment, Early childhood education, Classroom environment

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Abstract/Notes: A preschool experience was provided for lower-income negro children, and then their gains or losses in IQ and social integration were evaluated in terms of the type of the teaching method used. Thirty lower-income negro children and 17 middle-income negro and white children were separated into three groups and exposed to three teaching methods. Class one was unintegrated (all lower-income negro children) and non-Montessorial in methodology. It was the most unrestricted in terms of teacher control. Class two as integrated and non-Montessorial, but teacher control and restriction was more evident. Class three was integrated and Montessorial. The pupils here were the most disciplined and controlled. A thorough study was made of these classroom procedures, teaching techniques, and pupil activities. The results of the Stanford Binet intelligence tests showed no significant iq gain among the groups or within a group from test one at the beginning of the eight-week summer session to test two at the end of the session. But individual gains appeared. These were found to be an inverse function of distractibility. A winter pre-school session, with new pupils and using only the Montessori method, resulted in IQ gains. This was attributed to an improved classroom atmosphere. In general, the sessions did increase the children's readiness to begin school work and helped them to gain social confidence. Encouraging parental interest and participation was a collateral aspect of the programs. (WD)

Language: English

Published: Washington, D.C., 1966

Article

Learning Environments That Enhance Students’ Cognitive Functioning

Available from: Firenze University Press

Publication: Formare [Form@re], vol. 22, no. 1

Pages: 322-339

Academic achievement, Classroom environment, Learning environments, Prepared environment

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Abstract/Notes: A general rethinking of the school system is underway. Today, the purpose of school is to prepare students for rapid change and the complexity of reality so that they are not overwhelmed. Executive cognitive functions have been shown to be fundamental to this purpose, specifically thoughtful planning of an idea, reflexivity, systematic approach to a task/problem, and the ability to stay focused. These are the skills that tomorrow's leaders will need (Diamond and Lee, 2011). But what theoretical and instructional models exist that aim to develop the cognitive skills necessary to succeed in school and in life? How and to what extent are the pedagogical principles of these models reflected in the organization of the physical learning space? This paper aims to trace some of the methods that promote the development of executive cognitive skills and examine how they organize the learning space.   Ambienti di apprendimento che potenziano il funzionamento cognitivo degli studenti. È in atto un ripensamento generale del sistema scolastico. Oggi la finalità della scuola è di preparare gli studenti ai rapidi cambiamenti e alla complessità del reale in modo che non ne siano travolti. Fondamentali a questo scopo si sono rivelate le funzioni cognitive di tipo esecutivo, in particolare la pianificazione mentale di un’idea, la riflessività, la sistematicità nell’affrontare un compito/problema e la capacità di rimanere concentrati. Queste sono le competenze di cui avranno bisogno i leader di domani (Diamond & Lee, 2011). Ma quali sono i modelli teorici e didattici che si propongono di sviluppare le competenze cognitive necessarie per avere successo a scuola e nella vita? Come e in che misura i principi educativi di questi modelli si riflettono sull’organizzazione dello spazio fisico di apprendimento? Questo contributo si propone di ripercorrere alcuni tra i metodi che favoriscono lo sviluppo di competenze cognitive di tipo esecutivo e di indagare come organizzano lo spazio formativo.

Language: Italian

DOI: 10.36253/form-12606

ISSN: 1825-7321

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