Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

342 results

Article

Montessori Middle School Curriculum, Experiences, and Challenges (Part II)

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 26, no. 1

Pages: 26–31

See More

Language: English

Article

A Nutrition Education Program for Children–A Curriculum Overview

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 26, no. 1

Pages: 12–15

See More

Language: English

Book

Education and the Soul: Toward a Spiritual Curriculum

Holistic education

See More

Language: English

Published: Albany, New York: State University of New York Press, 2000

ISBN: 0-7914-4342-6 978-0-7914-4342-2 0-7914-4341-8 978-0-7914-4341-5

Book

Developing a Project Curriculum for Village Schools in India: A Suggestive Method of Procedure

Available from: Internet Archive

Asia, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, India, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, Rural education, South Asia

See More

Abstract/Notes: Specifically see section related to the work of Tagore and his school at Santiniketan which incorporates a Montessori-like method of education. Also published under the title, "New Schools for Young India: A Survey of Educational, Economic and Social Conditions in India with Special Reference to More Effective Education."

Language: English

Published: Chapel Hill, North Carolina: University of North Carolina Press, 1930

Master's Thesis

The Implementation of an Early Childhood Montessori Peace Curriculum to Mitigate Traumatic Events

Available from: MINDS@UW River Falls

Early childhood care and education, Montessori method of education, Peace education, Psychic trauma in children

See More

Abstract/Notes: This purpose of this action research project was created to study the effects of a peace curriculum and how it can help mitigate a pandemic or a traumatic societal event. The study took place in a public Montessori School located in the Midwest. There was a total of 15 children in the classroom that consisted of both pre-k and kindergarten aged children. This was a six- week study that included a peace curriculum, strategies, and tools for children to gain an understanding of peace and how it can be achieved during traumatic or stressful situations. The Peace Curriculum included discussions on natural disasters and our current COVID-19 virus as means to familiarize traumatic events and the use of coping strategies in promoting self-care. The children were provided with different group activities, strategies, and techniques to use, such as breathing techniques, visualization, yoga/movement, and discussions on peacemakers and how we all have the power to make a difference in the world and become global citizens. Quantitative and qualitative data collections were used to both determine their understanding of their emotions and develop ways to find their inner peace, peacemaking and peace keeping skills. The results showed that the children developed an awareness of others, their environment, and their abilities to be change agents and peacemakers. The outcome proved to have been effective providing children with an environment where they feel safe to share their thoughts and apply the strategies when coping with their own traumatic experiences.

Language: English

Published: River Falls, Wisconsin, 2021

Article

Comparison of the Results of Didactic Tests of Fifth Graders on the Basis of Gender and the Proclaimed Curriculum at Primary School

Available from: Univerzita Karlova - Pedagogicka Fakulta / Charles University - Faculty of Education

Publication: Project-Based Education and Other Activating Strategies in Science Education (PBE), vol. 2021

Pages: 126-133

Comparative education, Elementary education, Elementary school students, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Primary education, Primary school students, School children

See More

Abstract/Notes: The presented study deals with the issue of comparing achievement in didactic tests in mathematics between boys and girls in the context of preferred teaching management strategies. The research sample consisted of a total of 1133 respondents (Montessori - 73; Hejný - 332, ordinary primary school - 510; Dalton - 218). It turns out that statistically significant differences between boys and girls are only in an ordinary primary school and at a one percent level of significance (p < .01; d = .297). Examining the differences across these areas, especially for boys and girls, shows that both boys (p = .030) and girls (p = .053) may differ in achievement depending on the type of school they attend. / This work was presented at the PBE 2021 Conference.

Language: English

ISSN: 2695-0626

Article

Differential Outcomes of a Montessori Curriculum

Publication: American Montessori Society Bulletin, vol. 11, no. 2

Americas, Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

See More

Abstract/Notes: Authors believe that they have tentatively demonstrated that the Montessori curriculum is effective over a period of two years in nurturing continuing development in children in the areas of visual-motor integration, matching and sorting skills, psycho-motor skills, and to some extent number concepts. (Authors/MB) [This is a reprint of an article which first appeared in The Elementary School Journal in 1972.]

Language: English

ISSN: 0277-9064

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

The Effects of High-Stakes Testing on Secondary Language Arts Curriculum and Instruction

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

See More

Abstract/Notes: High-stakes testing has become mandatory since the reauthorization of the Elementary Secondary Educational Act, 2001 with its No Child Left Behind (NCLB) provisions. Beginning with the 2005-06 school year, students in grades K-8 must be tested yearly in reading and math. Students in secondary schools must be tested once in reading and math. Student scores at all grade levels are then used as part of the formula for determining whether or not a school retains its accreditation or is placed on a "needs improvement" list. Being identified as "needs improvement" for three consecutive years carries an assortment of serious consequences for schools. As a result of these high-stakes tests, secondary language arts teachers are expected to prepare students for state reading assessments. Studies have investigated the effects high-stakes testing has on elementary and secondary curriculum and instruction but have not focused specifically on secondary language arts teachers. Therefore, this study focuses on the effects high-stakes testing is having on secondary language arts' curriculum and instruction. Six high school junior English teachers from a Midwestern state were surveyed and interviewed. Five of the teachers also participated in a focus group discussion. From this data several common themes emerged including a narrowing of their curricula and a loss of instructional time to test preparation and the actual administration of the tests. In addition, teachers expressed feelings of inadequacy about their knowledge of effective pedagogy for improving adolescent reading skills. From this study it becomes clear that secondary language arts teachers need more information on best practices for working with adolescents and improving adolescent reading skills while incorporating the state reading standards and maintaining a meaningful curriculum and engaging instructional strategies. Administrators and state departments of education need to consider ways to provide useful in-services on reading for secondary teachers. In addition, university teacher education programs need to prepare future teachers and offer teachers who are currently in the classroom assistance in developing effective strategies for teaching reading skills to adolescents which will keep the students engaged.

Language: English

Published: Lawrence, Kansas, 2005

Doctoral Dissertation (Ed.D.)

Effectiveness of Preschool in Preparing Students for Kindergarten: A Comparison of Early Childhood Curriculum Models

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

See More

Abstract/Notes: Early childhood education has been shown to positively impact future academic performance, as well as social and emotional development. With ever-increasing demands being placed on children's academic performances, school readiness has become a key component of academic success. The purpose of this quantitative causal-comparative study was to examine the effectiveness of different early childhood curriculum models in preparing children for kindergarten, and to investigate whether one early childhood curriculum model better prepares students than another. The theoretical framework for the study is based on the developmental constructivist theories of Piaget, Vygotsky, Erikson, and Dewey. Kindergarten teachers assessed school readiness by administering the Kindergarten Observation Form. Each student had matriculated from either Montessori, High/Scope, or Reggio Emilia programs or early childhood programs without an identified curriculum model. Kindergarten teachers rated students on 24 items related to areas of cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical development. ANOVA and post-hoc tests revealed that students matriculating from programs without an identified curriculum model scored significantly better than their counterparts, F (3,122) = 5.33, p = .002. Implications for social change include improved kindergarten readiness on the part of students, increased awareness by educators as to best practices in early childhood education, and, a move towards understanding the types of environments in which children learn best.

Language: English

Published: Minneapolis, Minnesota, 2012

Doctoral Dissertation

An Evaluation of Magnet School Programs-Parent Choice, Teacher Choice, and Pupil Choice: Implications of One Model for Curriculum Reform

Available from: University of Illinois - IDEALS

See More

Abstract/Notes: It is quite clear that there is considerable disagreement as to the ways children learn and the ways teachers should teach. There is very little conclusive data comparing the major efforts in this field particularly with respect to any one factor being the sole contributor to the superiority of any one effort. The recent literature on learning and teaching almost invariably returns to some form of curriculum reform. However, there is widespread agreement that teachers teach more effectively and children learn more efficiently if they are in environments conducive to their preferred styles. Magnet Schools are vehicles that require different arrangements for teaching and learning. This study explores the attitudes of teachers, parents, and students in such an environment. Additionally, it examines the academic performance of students when parents or the students themselves select their learning environment and teaching method. The data will permit comparisons among the various groups of Magnet and non-Magnet parents, teachers, and students. The primary method for data collection is academic testing and structural surveys of the populations relative to Magnet and non-Magnet participants. The data will also indicate how individuals view programs and curriculum when they are involved in them. Because the population surveyed and tested involved a cross-section of academic abilities, the data will be especially useful to local school district officials interested in providing for individual differences in teaching and learning. The control model of Magnet School programs provides an ongoing testing ground for fine-tuning educational theories which may be essential for productive learning in the broader system as well.

Language: English

Published: Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, 1984

Advanced Search