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Book Section

The Teaching of Reading and Language Arts in the Montessori School

Available from: ERIC

Book Title: Implementing Montessori Education in the Public Sector

Pages: 144-156

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Language: English

Published: Cleveland, Ohio: North American Montessori Teachers' Association, 1990

Book Section

Prologue; Man's Spiritual Expressions: Language and Music, 1956

Book Title: The Montessori Approach to Music

Pages: 2-6

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Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori Pierson Publishing Company, 2020

ISBN: 978-90-79506-48-4

Series: The Montessori Series , 23

Book Section

Adopting the Montessori Methodology in Teaching Languages to Adult Students: Transnational Approach

Available from: Springer Link

Book Title: The 11th International Conference on European Transnational Educational (ICEUTE 2020, Burgos, Spain)

Pages: 187-195

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Abstract/Notes: Teaching adults unlike educating children, is a difficult area, owing to the learners’ educational and social background, compounded by their expectations and assumed goals. Bearing in mind that learning and teaching strategies may not be equally effective with all learners, it is advisable to propose such a mode of teaching that would accommodate especially those adults who face difficulties with gaining knowledge, due to factors outside the strictly educational sphere. This is where, Maria Montessori’s pedagogy steps in with a proposal addressed at those persons who have so far failed to succeed in learning a foreign language in a traditional way. Her pedagogy has inspired teachers and educators all over the world and consequently, had a profound effect on the structure and quality of teaching until today. Although it has mainly dealt with educating children and young people until the age of 18, there have been attempts to apply her methodology to adult teaching. The author of this article will look at the ways her philosophy can be adopted in teaching adults, however to get a better perception of the nature of her ideas, some attention has to be drawn to what drove Maria Montessori to devoting her professional life to education.

Language: English

Published: Berlin, Germany: Springer International Publishing, 2021

ISBN: 978-3-030-57799-5

Series: Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing , 1266

Article

World Languages: Case Study in Spanish

Publication: Whole School Montessori Handbook

Pages: 277–293

Americas, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Teacher training, Teachers, United States of America

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Language: English

Book

Montessori Language Program

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Language: English

Published: Mesa, Arizona: Montessori Research and Development Center, 1985

Book Section

Language and Montessori

Book Title: Building the Foundations for Creative Learning

Pages: 144-170

American Montessori Society (AMS), New York

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Language: English

Published: New York: American Montessori Society, 1964

Book Section

An Overview of the Montessori Language Curriculum

Book Title: Readings Toward a Montessori Language Curriculum

Pages: 166-184

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Language: English

Published: Lexington, Massachusetts: Ginn Press, 1986

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Second Language Corner for Children’s House: A Practitioner–Researcher Journey Into Bilingualism in Montessori Education

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 7, no. 1

Pages: 67-82

Americas, Bilingualism, Central America, Latin America and the Caribbean, Mexico, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: This work reports, from a qualitative research perspective, the development of an English Corner project for a preschool Children’s House classroom in central Mexico over the course of a 3-year period. It shows the transition of a language specialist over six consecutive periods of work, from a traditional understanding and practice of teaching English as a second language to young learners into a more comprehensive one of the Montessori Method. The analysis of my own practice is used to recover insights through a reflective process with the intention to develop a second language (L2) Montessori program for 3- to 6-year-olds that aligns better with Montessori pedagogy.  Variables such as instruction time, setting, group constitution, materials, and teaching and learning strategies allowed for certain aspects to arise as leading points of interest for the focus of the analysis and the methodological and pedagogical adaptations that followed each period. This paper is an attempt to fill the gap between the need to deliver a second language effectively in Montessori education and the lack of guidance for doing it the Montessori way; it is especially for practitioners who do not have a Montessori background but also for Montessori-trained teachers for whom more specific preparation would aid their practice. I also hope to stimulate further research in the field of second language acquisition and multilingualism in Montessori education at every level of education.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v7i1.13401

ISSN: 2378-3923

Book

The NAMTA Montessori Bibliography Second Edition: A Bibliography of Sources in the English Language 1909-1993

Bibliographies, Montessori method of education, North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA)

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Language: English

Published: Cleveland, Ohio: North American Montessori Teachers' Association, 1995

Edition: 2nd ed.

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Max: Concern with Social Skills, Language and Excessive TV Viewing in a 3 Year Old

Available from: Lippincott Wolters

Publication: Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, vol. 27, no. 6

Pages: 488–492

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Abstract/Notes: Max is a 3-year-old healthy boy who was brought to the pediatrician's office by his mother for frequent temper tantrums at home. His teachers at the Montessori school are concerned about his communication skills. He is very talkative with his peers, but he constantly speaks about Thomas the Tank Engine. His peers seem to be uninterested in his repetitive stories. His teachers believe that Max has difficulty separating fantasy and reality. At home, his mother describes Max as “difficult to control.” When placed in time-out, he hits, kicks and scratches his mother. He has a large vocabulary, but mostly speaks in phrases directly from cartoons. For example, he repeats a particular phrase from a program in which the main character grows in size with fury every time he gets angry and says, “I hate it, leave me alone.” Before this exposure, the mother reports that her son had never used the word “hate.” Max watches 5 hours of children's programs on television every day; he is not exposed to any news programs. Frequently, he watches the same episode of a program many times. Max's mother believes that he can watch as much TV as he wants as long as it is “good programming,” so he only watches PBS kids shows and the Disney channel.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1097/DBP.0b013e3181d83173

ISSN: 0196-206X

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