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Article

Secondary Montessori Education in the Netherlands, Montessori Lyceum Amsterdam 1930

Publication: Communications: Journal of the Association Montessori Internationale (2009-2012), vol. 2011, no. 1-2

Pages: 156–161

Europe, Holland, Montessori Lyceum Amsterdam (Netherlands), Netherlands, Western Europe, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: The Montessori Lyceum of Amsterdam (MLA) is the oldest Montessori secondary school in the world. Although Maria Montessori had obviously started thinking about adolescent education long before its establishment in 1930, no other organization, or association of parents, had taken concrete steps towards the realization of an adolescent environment along Montessori principles. This account offers some interesting historical insights in how the Dutch communicated with Dr Montessori on the establishment of such a school.

Language: English

ISSN: 1877-539X

Article

Madame Montessori Coming

Available from: Newspapers.com

Publication: Venice Vanguard (Venice, California)

Pages: 3

Americas, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: "Madame Montessori Coming- Los Angeles is to have the first demonstration, outside of Italy, of the world-famous Montessori system of teaching. May first, the great educator is coming and beach educators and those interested in child education are taking much interest in the event, which will be epoch making in its significance. Opinions differ largely as to the benefits to be derived from Madame Montessori's visit though all are loud in the praises of her methods as to the best way of reaching the child mind. Professori Cree T. Work of the Venice High School, call Madame Montessori's methods good and rational, the Venice educator has always felt in close sympathy with the plans that followed up the Froebel ideas, which take much the form of this Italian woman's system. "I think her visit here should be of great interest and help to us," said Mr. Work this morning, "we have a great number of her ideas working in our kindergartens at the present time, but she has combined them, and made them into splendid whole, that may be able to give us new ideas and new inspirations. Her ideas in the form of a system, will work wonders." Mrs. W. H. Anderson, president of the Venice Woman's Club, expressed herself as believing firmly in the Montessori system, which is an outgrowth of the article written years ago, by Radosavovich, head of the department of Pedagogy of the University of New York. These articles were published in German and admitted by the Italian teacher, as being of great help to her. "Madame Montessori is no doubt, the foremost educator of the day," said Mrs. Anderson, "I have known, from long study of my own children, that the child mind must be led through its impressions and not forced to accept its education. Their inclinations must lead to their development, in fact, the system is a Burbanking of the human mind, a grafting of impressions where and when they will best take root and develop." Mrs. Anderson speaks from experience, as she has carefully watched, step by step, the development of her own lovely daughters. Professor W. Y. Thornbury, principal of the Venice Grammar Schools, is not as enthusiastic about the Montessori system. Mr. Thornbury says, he has given some little time to the study of her system, and thinks she states a fallacy, when she says that a 3-year old child can do the same things that a child of 6 or 16 can accomplish. "The regular kindergarten work, as advocated by Froebel has all the time upheld the idea of the appeal to the senses of the child, and making him learn through self activity," said Mr. Thornbury, "and I don't think she has added anything to help us materially, I think her method embraces childhood at far to early an age; at 3 years old, the child should still be under guidance of a mother, instead of a teacher, and at the age of 4 and one-half years, when out kindergartens take them, I think our system can scarcely be added to, by that of the Italian teacher. We have tried to purchase part of the material used in her system, but can not do so without taking the whole, which, costs fifty dollars, and is well protected by a copyright." Miss Catherine Moore, who is conducting the arrangements for Dr. Montessori's coming, May 1, is receiving letters and telegrams from prominent educators all over the country. Many of them are coming. Mrs. Alexander Graham Bell, president of the Montessori Educational Association of Washington, D. C., has just written congratulating Los Angeles and offering cooperation. The association includes Philander P. Claxton, United States commissioner of Education; Miss Margaret Woodrow Wilson and many other members of Washington official circles. San Francisco wants the "Dottoressa," and so does San Diego. "President Francis, by his early recognition and understanding of her system, is to be credited for the coming of Dr. Montessori to Los Angeles first of any city outside of Italy," said Miss Moore. "The whole country is now interested." Classes will be held at the East Seventh street school, Saint Catherine's nonsectarian school and the Hotel Maryland, Pasadena. The children of Miss Moore's class at Saint Catherine's will be used for demonstrations every Saturday during the course. Dr. Montessori has accepted the invitation of the officials of the San Diego Exposition to visit the exposition in July, according to Mrs. Mary Paul-Jordon of 456 North Juanita street. Officials of the exposition received a cablegram from Dr. Montessori, who is still in Rome, late yesterday. This information was received by Dr. Jordon in a telegram from Duncan MacKinnon, superintendent of schools of the Southern city [San Diego], last night."

Language: English

Article

The Montessori Erdkinder: Three Abstracts [Montessori de Terra Linda, San Rafael, CA; Hershey Montessori School, Concord Township, OH; Lake Country School, Minneapolis, MN]

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 18, no. 1

Pages: 172–182

⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Describes three projects: (1) the Laufenburg Ranch Project, a historical organic farm and agricultural and environmental education center; (2) the Hershey Montessori School's efforts to teach adolescents about the earth; and (3) the Lake Country School, which developed a farm campus and nature center as an integral part of its educational program.

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Book Section

Einige Hinweise zur Montessori-Literatur [Some references to the Montessori literature]

Book Title: Die Montessori-Pädagogik und das behinderte Kind: Referate und Ergebnisse des 18. Internationalen Montessori Kongresses (München, 4-8 Juli 1977) [Montessori Pedagogy and the Handicapped Child: Papers and Results of the 18th International Montessori Congress (Munich, July 4-8, 1977)]

Pages: 199-215

Conferences, International Montessori Congress (18th, Munich, Germany, 4-8 July 1977), Montessori method of education - Research

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Language: German

Published: München: Kindler, 1978

ISBN: 3-463-00716-9

Article

Montessori Milestones [Chiaravalle Montessori School, Evanston, IL; Wyoming Valley Montessori School, Kingston, PA; AMS scholarships]

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 5, no. 1

Pages: 15–16

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Preschool Educational Approaches: A Comparative Study

Available from: Comparative Education Society of Iran (CESIR)

Publication: Iranian Journal of Comparative Education, vol. 5, no. 2

Pages: 1898-1928

Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Reggio Emilia approach (Early childhood education) - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Waldorf method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., ⚠️ Invalid DOI

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Abstract/Notes: The aim of research was a comparative study of preschool educational approaches. In this research, the components of goals, content, teaching method, educational atmosphere and evaluation in romantic, humanistic, Montessori, Waldorf and Reggio Emilia approaches have been compared. The method of data collection and analysis were documentary and Bereday’s four-step approach respectively. In dimension of goals, all approaches emphasize the enrichment of the child's imagination through the senses. In the activities dimension, all approaches emphasize the learning process. Montessori and Reggio Emilia's approach, more than other approaches, design activities in a more problem-oriented manner. In the Montessori, Reggio Emilia and Waldorf approaches emphasized the question-and-answer method and indirect transmission of material to the child. In particular, the Reggio Emilia and Waldorf approaches have made the learning method the basis of child-teacher interaction, and teaching means the process of helping children learn research. In the dimension of educational atmosphere, human interaction with the environment - through the senses - is the basis of education in all approaches. In the evaluation dimension - with the exception of the Montessori approach which focuses on the extent to which predetermined goals are achieved-, other approaches do not emphasize learning standards and the evaluation is not done in the traditional way. Iranian curriculum planners are encouraged to use the findings of the present study to develop a suitable approach for early childhood education

Language: English

DOI: 10.22034/ijce.2022.301204.1339

ISSN: 2588-7270

Article

Towards a Constructivist Montessori Education

Available from: Sabinet African Journals

Publication: Perspectives in Education, vol. 22, no. 2

Pages: 37-49

Cognitive development, Constructivism (Education) - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Early childhood education, Jean Piaget - Philosophy, Lev Vygotsky - Philosophy, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Abstract/Notes: This article argues that the Montessori method can be recast as a viable contemporary, constructivist programme for early childhood education. Montessori believed that children in the crucial years from birth to age six possess extraordinary, innate mental powers to "absorb" the environment. This view was typical of the now outdated zeitgeist within which Montessori developed her innatist account of learning in children and put forward the concept of sensorial activity. Critiques of Montessori along anti-innatist lines developed by both Piaget and Vygotsky in the 1930s provide the possibility of a break with static, innatist conceptions of learning. The suggestion here is that while Piaget and Vygotsky both held Montessori in high regard, they were unhappy with her construal of "sensory education". Each wanted to use her method and materials as a vehicle for the constructive activity that children engage in when they learn. The paper argues that Montessori's early notion of activity can be the basis for a contemporary reappropriation of her work in the terms of cognitive developmental constructivism.

Language: English

ISSN: 0258-2236

Document

Declaration Judgment [by the Switzerland Federal Court] concerning the degeneration of the mark "Montessori" as claimed by Association Montessori Internationale [BGE 130 III 113]

Available from: Bundesgericht Tribunal Federal (Switzerland)

Association Montessori Internationale (AMI) - History, Intellectual property, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - History, Trademark dilution

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Language: German

Published: Nov 3, 2003

Article

Tra laici e cattolici. Il dibattito su Maria Montessori nei primi anni del ’900 / Between Secularists and Catholics. The Debate on Maria Montessori in the Early 20th Century

Available from: Rivista di Storia dell’Educazione

Publication: Rivista di Storia dell’Educazione, vol. 8, no. 2

Pages: 25-35

Catholics, Europe, Italy, Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Southern Europe

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Abstract/Notes: The contribution, after a brief parenthesis which describes the Unione Magistrale Nazionale and the Associazione Magistrale Italiana “Nicolò Tommaseo” as expressions of the difficult socio-educational condition experienced by Giolitti’s Italy, through different opinions taken from the files of two representative pedagogical magazines of the time, Rivista Pedagogica and Scuola Italiana Moderna, analyzes the way in which, in the first twenty years 1900s, secular and catholic circles discussed Maria Montessori’s thought and system.

Language: Italian

DOI: 10.36253/rse-10312

ISSN: 2532-2818

Article

Maria Montessori, Il Metodo della Pedagogia Scientifica applicato all’educazione infantile nelle Case dei Bambini. Edizione critica, Roma, Edizioni Opera Nazionale Montessori

Available from: La Mediazione Pedagogica

Publication: La Mediazione Pedagogica, vol. 2, no. 1

Furio Pesci - Writings, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Maria Montessori - Writings, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - History

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Language: Italian

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