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Master's Thesis (M.A.)

Dealing with Diversity: Administrator, Teacher and Parent Perceptions of the Responsiveness of Montessori Schools to Racial and Ethnic Diversity

Available from: American Montessori Society

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Language: English

Published: Chicago, Illinois, 2012

Book

A Parents' Guide to the Montessori Classroom

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Language: English

Published: Altoona, Pennsylvania: Montessori Learning Center, 1975

Book

The Parent-Centered Early School: Highland Community School of Milwaukee

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

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Abstract/Notes: In May, 1991, the newly chosen Milwaukee Public Schools Superintendent, Dr. Ho,vard Fuller, visited Highland Community School. His main question to parents and staff assembled to greet him was, "What lessons can we public school people learn from you?" Highland people had cogent ideas to pass on to him. This book is a more formal response in which I hope the hundreds of people who have continuously created Highland in its first twenty-five years speak through me in answer to him and to his colleagues elsewhere in public education. Highland began in late 1968, and by 1994 was one of only ten schools in the entire country to qualify for state-financed vouchers to independent urban schools. It is small: about seventy ethnically and economically diverse students aged two-and-a-half to ten years, three teachers and three assistants, a full-time executive director, and three part-time helpers, including a parent coordinator. One of the teachers doubles as principal. Annual expenditures per pupil are about $2,800. The curriculum is Montessori-based. The building is a century-old mansion. The school is governed by a nine-member parent board of directors and helped, primarily in fund-raising, by an advisory group of trustees. It is located in Milwaukee's Near West Side, an economically depressed and violent neighborhood (Jeffrey Dahmer's apartment, since razed, was only five blocks from the school). This is the story of a small school. Faced with the vastness of urban decay and its impact on educational institutions, the reader might question whether describing and analyzing this diminutive organization has any relevance to urban education. Despite differences between it and stereotypical urban public schools, however, it brings a message to American education much more important than its size seems to warrant. Its size is precisely the point. Change nucleates and incubates in small settings. Our huge society conditions us to think in terms of large numbers, sweeping change, vast federal programs. Government may be able to create contexts for change, but the changes themselves have to be brought about where individuals assemble to meet their mutual needs. Whether their relationships will be harmonious and productive, or acrimonious and dysfunctional, depends on how the organization is structured and what spirit has been breathed into it. This book fleshes out the organizational and attitudinal reasons that Highland works so well and what public education can learn from this small inner-city educational oasis. As a framework for the organization of this study, let us first review factors that research has revealed make a school effective.

Language: English

Published: New York, New York: Garland, 1997

Edition: 1st

ISBN: 978-1-315-05106-2

Series: Studies in Education and Culture , 10

Book

The Child: What Every Caring Parent Needs to Know

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Abstract/Notes: Includes parent discussion guide

Language: English

Published: Clarendon Hills, Illinois: MECA-Seton Teacher Education Program, 2001

Master's Thesis (M.S.)

Children's Effortful Control in a Montessori Classroom: Effects of Parenting and Purposeful Work

Available from: University of Arkansas

Classroom environments, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Parenting, Prepared environment

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Abstract/Notes: Research in effortful control is necessary to understand and support children's behaviors in Social and classroom settings (Rimm-Kaufman, Curby, Grimm, Brock, & Nathanson, 2009). This study reviewed literature discussing the relationship between parenting style and effortful control and Montessori philosophy as it relates to the work in practical life. The literature reviewed in this study suggested that parenting style may also be related to a child's effortful control. In addition, it was expected that the work of practical life in a Montessori classroom would positively influence effortful control in children. Using an experimental design, this study examined the efficacy of a Montessori Table Washing Task to prime effortful control in children ages 3-6. The Mischel Marshmallow Test (Mischel & Baker 1975) was used to test effortful control in the children. Children in the control group received only the Marshmallow Test. Children in the experiment group received a Montessori Table Washing Lesson prior to receiving the Marshmallow Test. Although not statistically significant, there was a difference in the groups. However, in this study, there was no correlation found between parenting style and the effortful control of the children. Implications of this study are that practical life work, like a Montessori Table Washing Task, may positively affect effortful control in pre-school age children.

Language: English

Published: Fayetteville, Arkansas, 2012

Article

Kindergarten Parents' Perceptions Survey About Using an Intelligent Robot / 지능형 로봇 활용에 관한 유치원 학부모의 인식조사

Available from: RISS

Publication: Montessori교육연구 [Montessori Education Research], vol. 17, no. 2

Pages: 76-93

Asia, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, East Asia, Montessori method of education, South Korea

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Abstract/Notes: This investigation aims to let parents understand and use an intelligent robot This is based on kindergarten parents' perceptions survey about using an inte1ligent robot in preschool education field. This researcher had made an analysis of the need for educational assistance robot with the revised questionnaire that was based on a robot perceptions survey by Hyunmin Yun(2010) to 100 people who have children as 3, 4, 5 years old in a preschool educational institution which is located in Chungcheong-province. According to this study, more than fifty percent of the 100 people recognized there is a difference between a robot and a computer. A robot is more effective at listening to children's songs than a computer as well. They preferred a robot in an animal shape and requested that it not be used for more than 30 minutes pet day. In conclusion using a robot in preschool education filed will be needed to give the chance a variety of experiences, such as playing with th erobot and counselling for the children, like close friends. / 본 연구는 유아교육현장에서 이루어지는 로봇 활용 교육에 대한 부모의 인식 조사를 토대로 로봇 활용교육에 대한 부모님의 이해와 활용을 돕고자 하는데 그 목적이 있다. 이를 위해 충청북도에 위치한 유아교육기관의 만 3·4·5세 학부모 100명을 대상으료 윤현민(2010)의 로봇인식조사를 기초하여 본 연구자가 수정 보완한 인식설문지를 통해 로봇에 대한 학부모의 경험과 인식에 대한 질문, 교사보조 교육용 로봇의 활용과 필요성에 대한 학부모님의 인식을 분석하였다. 연구결과 50%이상의 부모는 로봇과 컴퓨터는 다르다고 인식하며 로봇은 동화와 동요 듣기 기능에 좀 더 효과적이며 외형적인 요소로는 동물을 선호하며 하루 이용시간은 30분을 초과하지 않길 요구하고 있다. 결과적으로 유아교육현장에서 로봇을 활용한 교육을 할 때, 로봇을 활용한 다양한 경험을 해봄으로써 다양한 사고를 할 수 있는 기회 제공, 친구처럼 놀아주며, 유아의 고민 상담을 해 줄 수 있는 또 다른 요인으로 교육활동을 구성하여야 하는 필요성을 시사해준다.

Language: Korean

ISSN: 1226-9417

Doctoral Dissertation

Communication Strategies of Public School and Montessori Parents and Teachers

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

Communications, Elementary education, Montessori method of education, Montessori schools, Parent-teacher relationships, Parents, Public Montessori, Teachers

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Abstract/Notes: Two important aspects of teaching and caring for children were explored using a questionnaire: communication preferences for talking to children and assumptions about how children think about specific things in various situations. Forty parents and teachers from Montessori Schools and forty parents and teachers from Milwaukee Public Schools completed a questionnaire concerning four social situations and one factual situation. Parents and teachers ranked responses to each situation from 1 to 5 or wrote an alternative response if none of those given were appropriate. Parents and teachers also predicted what they would actually do in each situation and described their ideal response in each case. In the second part of the questionnaire parents and teachers gave their views on how children understood ideas relating to time, another's point of view, and play. The responses to the questionnaire by parents and teachers tended to reflect the basic philosophy of Montessori education, which is based upon a cognitive constructivist model in which rational authoritative and distancing strategies rank higher than diversion, normative authoritative, and direct authoritative strategies. Moreover, the beliefs and behaviors of Montessori parents and teachers tended to support this conclusion. A difference was found in the diversion strategy whereby both groups ranked diversion high in the first and second social situations and very low in the fourth and fifth social situations. These differences were likely due to the particular type of situation described. The majority of subjects, both teachers and parents, responded with more cognitive reasons than social reasons to the five situations. They also responded more frequently with active answers than passive answers. Finally, it was found that public school teachers and parents who were from upper middle class districts and professionally educated tended to use the same strategies as the Montessori teachers and parents. In fact, there were no significant differences between the ideal ranking of these five situations by these two groups.

Language: English

Published: Madison, Wisconsin, 1982

Article

Parent Education in the Home

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 42, no. 2

Pages: 155-167

North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Abstract/Notes: Charo Alarcón speaks about the work of Lumin Education in partnering with parents, Early Head Start, and a national program called Parents as Teachers (PAT) to come together to serve low-income families. Recognizing that parents cannot prioritize their child's education when they are putting all of their energy into meeting the basic needs of the family, Alarcón created a program to go into homes to educate and support parents beginning during pregnancy. The program encourages defined work spaces in the home and inviting the child to work. The child internalizes his perception of the world, whether it be good or bad, in the first years (even first weeks) of life. Emphasizing the importance of development during the first years of life, and offering practical tools for parents early on in parenthood to foster routine, freedom of choice, repetition, beauty and order, can transform "not just the child's life experience but entire communities." [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Children on the Edge: Creating a Path for Happy, Healthy Development," January 12-15, 2017 in New Orleans, LA.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

A Guide to Parent Observation in the Primary Class

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 13, no. 1

Pages: 43–49

North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Letting Go and Letting Montessori, [part 2]: Resolving Parental Resistance to Separation From Their Child

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 13, no. 2

Pages: 113–128

North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA) - Periodicals

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Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

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