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Article

Deconstructing the Positive Behavioral Support Model and Replacing It with the Neo-Montessori Constructivist Intervention Model, or How Montessori Changed My Cold Data Driven Heart

Available from: Wright State University Libraries

Publication: Electronic Journal for Inclusive Education, vol. 3, no. 3

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, People with disabilities

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Abstract/Notes: Positive behavioral supports (PBS) and the development of behaviorally oriented planning has become a ubiquitous paradigm in American schools. It is the preferred model for addressing behavioral issues with children as a means of preventing special education identification and placement. The effectiveness of this model has been well documented in peer-reviewed journals and shows an ability to change behaviors and improve academic achievement as measured by empirically designed assessments. However, the measurement of intellectual, moral and behavioral autonomy is seldom measured. Also, researchers from one perspective (Applied Behavioral Analysis) preclude other theoretical perspectives, to create the bulk of the evidence proving the usefulness of PBS as a viable model. It is the purpose of this paper to describe and support the contention that it is the concept of autonomy that is essential in measuring the success of behaviorally related interventions. This goal will be attained by deconstructing the PBS model. Further, it is an additional contention addressed in this paper that various Montessori methods and the theory’s fundamental theoretical concepts do a better job of addressing authentic change and the development of autonomy. This will result in internalized behaviors that behaviorally oriented methods can never demonstrate. A new theoretical model will be presented to illustrate the incorporation of autonomy into the rubric of successful behaviorally related interventions.

Language: English

ISSN: 1545-0473

Article

A Learning Environment for Educationally Handicapped Children

Publication: American Montessori Society Bulletin, vol. 7, no. 2

Pages: 1-22

Children with disabilities, Developmentally disabled children, Inclusive education, ⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 0277-9064

Article

Special Thanks to David Kahn and NAMTA

Publication: The Alcove: Newsletter of the Australian AMI Alumni Association, no. 12

Pages: 2

David Kahn - Biographic sources, North American Montessori Teachers' Association (NAMTA)

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Language: English

Video Recording

Reminiscences of a Montessori Life

, Margot Waltuch (Contributor) , Geoffrey Richman (Contributor)

Margot R. Waltuch - Biographic sources, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: Narrated by Margot Waltuch; edited by Geoffrey Richman.

Runtime: 18 minutes

Language: English

Published: Cleveland, Ohio, 1999

Article

The Egg Man and the Empress

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 17, no. 3

Pages: 50-54

Educational change, Educational history, Educational philosophy, Educational Philosophy, Experiential learning, Montessori method of education, Social Class, Teaching methods, ⛔ No DOI found, Teaching Methods, Thinking Skills

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Abstract/Notes: In this article, the author compares the legacies of two remarkable educators--John Dewey and Maria Montessori. These include changes in education now so commonplace that is accepted as traditional. Both Montessori and Dewey lived long enough to see their ideas receive worldwide recognition and acceptance, along with a share of misunderstanding and rejection. Over 50 years after their death, both are enjoying renewed popularity. The differences in their thought lie in the philosophical and educational thinking which are reflected in their different milieus. Dewey was a thorough American secular Democrat with egalitarian values and ideals while Montessori reflected the class consciousness and noblesse-oblige of Italian Catholic society. However, both of them share a primacy in the idea of the role of "the hand" in education. For Dewey, it represents the importance of always trying initial learning to hands-on experience. Similarly, Montessori believed that all learning should start with concrete hands-on experience and progress to abstraction. Both Montessori and Dewey recognized the value and importance of manual labor. Also, the role of memorization in education receives an equal lack of plaudits from both Montessori and Dewey. The former clearly separated memorization from abstraction. She considered it more as a necessary means to other ends, without much inherent interest. While the steps to abstraction gave form to the Montessori curriculum, the process of problem solving was essential to Dewey's "projects education." Memorization and recitation only took meaning as a helpful part of this process.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Doctoral Dissertation

Informationstechnologien und Montessori-Pädagogik: die Implementierung des Internets als Informationsmedium in Montessori-Schulen der USA [Information technologies and Montessori pedagogy: the implementation of the Internet as an information medium in Montessori schools in the USA]

Available from: Pädagogische Hochschule Freiburg

Americas, Information and communications technology (ICT), Montessori method of education, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Ausgehend von der Beobachtung, dass in der Unterrichtsforschung Konzepte des „offenen Lernens“ für die Implementierung neuer Medien, wie dem Internet, empfohlen werden, wird der Zusammenhang zwischen reformpädagogischen Ansätzen und neuen Informationstechnologien hergestellt. Hier knüpfen die Untersuchungen der vorliegenden Arbeit an. Herausgegriffen wird das Konzept Maria Montessoris, untersucht in den USA, wo sich zum einen alternative Pädagogiken freier entwickeln können und zum anderen die Implementierung neuer Medien in den Unterricht offensiver vorangetrieben wird. Es wird angenommen, dass die Lernumgebung Montessoris unter dem Gesichtspunkt einer Modernisierung des Konzepts auf die heutigen Ansprüche eine optimale Lernlandschaft bietet, das Internet als natürliche Informationsquelle in den Unterricht zu integrieren. Die gegenwärtig kontroverse Umsetzung der Pädagogik Montessoris (AMI und AMS) sowie die zu diesem Zeitpunkt verwirklichte Internetnutzung in den Schulen werden am Beispiel der USA einer kritischen Reflexion unterzogen. Kapitel 1 dieser Arbeit betrachtet die Pädagogik Montessoris. Ein Abschnitt liefert Informationen über die kontemporäre Verwirklichung ihrer Pädagogik in den USA. Die Möglichkeiten des Internets für den Unterricht, die Aussagen der Forschung über das informationstechnische Lernen sowie seine Integration in den USA, wird in Kapitel 2 näher untersucht. In Kapitel 3 wird die Notwendigkeit des Interneteinsatzes in Schulen überprüft und die Eignung offener Strukturen als Basis dafür begründet. Die gewonnenen Erkenntnisse geben die Grundlage zu den in Kapitel 4 und 5 beschriebenen Untersuchungen, wie diese Implementierung in der Praxis nordamerikanischer Montessori-Schulen verwirklicht ist. Beschrieben wird sowohl eine Querschnittsuntersuchung als auch eine Fallstudie. Kapitel 6 schildert die pädagogischen Konsequenzen für die Nutzung des Internets im Unterricht. [Based on the observation that teaching research recommends concepts of “open learning” for the implementation of new media such as the Internet, the connection between reform-pedagogical approaches and new information technologies is established. This is where the investigations of the present work tie in. The concept of Maria Montessori is being singled out, examined in the USA, where, on the one hand, alternative pedagogies can develop more freely and, on the other hand, the implementation of new media in the classroom is being promoted more aggressively. It is assumed that the Montessori learning environment, from the point of view of modernizing the concept to meet today's requirements, offers an optimal learning landscape to integrate the Internet as a natural source of information into the classroom. The currently controversial implementation of Montessori pedagogy (AMI and AMS) as well as the internet usage in schools at that time are subjected to critical reflection using the example of the USA. Chapter 1 of this thesis looks at Montessori's pedagogy. A section provides information on the contemporary realization of their pedagogy in the USA. The possibilities of the Internet for teaching, the statements of research about information technology learning and its integration in the USA are examined in more detail in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 examines the necessity of using the Internet in schools and explains the suitability of open structures as a basis for this. The knowledge gained provides the basis for the investigations described in Chapters 4 and 5, how this implementation is realized in practice in North American Montessori schools. Both a cross-sectional study and a case study are described. Chapter 6 describes the pedagogical consequences for the use of the Internet in the classroom.]

Language: German

Published: Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany, 2003

Book Section

Synopsis of Study of Montessori Application for Brain-Damaged Children

Book Title: Proceedings of the International Symposium [American Montessori Society (AMS)]

Pages: 26-30

Brain damage, Brain-damaged children, Children with disabilities, Conferences, Inclusive education

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Language: English

Published: New York: American Montessori Society, 1979

Article

The Montessori Training Class

Available from: HathiTrust

Publication: American Annals of the Deaf, vol. 58, no. 2

Pages: 179-181

Children with disabilities, Deaf, Inclusive education

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Language: English

ISSN: 0002-726X, 1543-0375

Article

The Montessori Method: A Comparison

Available from: HathiTrust

Publication: American Annals of the Deaf, vol. 58, no. 2

Pages: 117-125

Children with disabilities, Deaf, Inclusive education

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Language: English

ISSN: 0002-726X, 1543-0375

Article

The Epic of Evolution Conference: Taking the Journey Back Home

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 23, no. 1

Pages: 140-144

Early childhood education, ⛔ No DOI found

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Abstract/Notes: Provides a summary of the presentations at the "Epic of Evolution" conference held by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (November 12-14, 1997). Describes the impact of the conference in relation to the work of Montessori and the work of Montessori teachers in scientific pursuits in the classroom.

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

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