Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

386 results

Article

Moral Development: From Cosmic Education to Adolescent Action

Available from: ERIC

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 42, no. 3

Pages: 31-41

Cosmic education, Elizabeth Henke - Writings

See More

Abstract/Notes: "The most essential component to offering the children an education for peace is the emphasis on that which unites us." With this focus, Elizabeth Henke presents a picture of how Montessori students progressively develop a sense of moral, civic, and social responsibility. The foundation is set during the elementary years when children gain an understanding of the interconnectedness of all life and the commonalities between all people through Cosmic Education. The morality developed in elementary is refined during adolescence and is aided by coursework that is focused on current ethical issues and opportunities to participate in their school, local, and global communities. As they begin to place themselves into the world by thinking of themselves as citizens of their community and components of culture, their work for the betterment of that world gains relevance. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA Adolescent Workshop at the AMI/ USA Refresher Course, February 17-20, 2017 in Austin, TX.]

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

The Unconscious in History

Publication: NAMTA Journal, vol. 23, no. 2

Pages: 44-64

Maria Montessori - Writings, Mario M. Montessori - Writings

See More

Abstract/Notes: Describes the absorbent mind as the manifestation of individual unconscious and as the unconscious forces manifested in nature's evolution. The natural creative unconscious directs the instinctive balance of nonhuman lives. Human consciousness creates a conscious, human-made universe, a cultural and technological zone, which evolves on its own terms. Children become more conscious of the collective human role in evolution. (Author)

Language: English

ISSN: 1522-9734

Article

Montessori for Children with Learning Differences

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 29, no. 1

Pages: 48-53

Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, Joyce S. Pickering - Writings, Montessori method of education, Montessori method of education, People with disabilities, ⛔ No DOI found

See More

Abstract/Notes: To help the child who learns differently, when the usual presentation is not helping a student, Montessori educators can use several techniques: * reduce the difficulty of an activity * use more tactile-kinesthetic input * create control charts * focus on the development of oral language * increase the structure for the child with impulse control difficulties, assuming the necessity to help the ADHD child to sustain attention, teaching how to make work choices and how to develop a cycle of work * combine Multisensory Structured Language techniques with Montessori Language presentations. Note: If the child is not holding the pitcher correctly, the lesson may have to become how to hold a pitcher and work up to pouring. * Dressing Frames: lesson reduced to a first presentation of untying, unbuttoning, unbuckling, etc., with each step presented in separate lessons working toward the final step of mastering the direct purpose of the lesson * Cutting bananas and bread before cutting more solid foods, like carrots * Attaching language to the name of the presentation and all of the materials used in the lesson that is at the level of the child's oral language development SENSORIAL: * Pink Tower: Reduce the number of cubes to use every other cube, beginning with the largest, thereby increasing the discrimination to a 2 cm difference. LANGUAGE: * Since oral language skills may be a weakness for many students with learning differences, it is usually necessary to add a program of oral language development assessment and instruction to enhance vocabulary and verbal expression. The MACAR Oral Language Development Manual is one such program (Pickering, 1976). * Written language, which includes reading, spelling, composition, and handwriting, requires the combination of Montessori language materials and the therapeutic techniques of a multisensory structured language (MSL) approach (e.g., Orton-Gillingham, Sequential English Education (SEE), Slingerland, Spalding, or Wilson Language). * Use additional phonological awareness shelf activities (pat out each sound in a word; place a small floral stone or disk on a picture card for each sound in a word). * Present the Sandpaper Letters in the sequence taught in the therapeutic program. * Use the decoding pattern of blending the beginning sound to the word family of short and long vowel word family words.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Report

Evaluation of the Prekindergarten Head Start Program 1979-1980. Technical Summary

See More

Abstract/Notes: Oriented toward a direct instructional routine in preparation for regular school, the Philadelphia Prekindergarten Head Start Program (PKHS) provides experiences to counter-balance effects of social and economic disadvantagement; parent involvement; staff development; and special supportive services. It employs five instructional models: Bank Street, Behavioral Analysis, Montessori, open classroom, and responsive learning. Observations indicate that children's activities usually emphasized language and social developmental skill areas, while adults were primarily observed in group leader or direct teacher roles. When tested against the Developmental Behavior Checklist, PKHS children accomplished approximately the same number of items as the total prekindergarten population. During the course of the program the number of children identified as developmentally "delayed" or "suspicious" decreased by 50 percent. It also appears that the program has a positive lasting effect on children's scores on standardized tests through grade 5. Children enrolled in the program received extensive psychological, nutritional and social services during 1979-80. Parent involvement in the program was high in both classroom participation and policy or planning meetings. Staff development was also a major component of the program. Over 70 percent of staff attended more than five workshops during the year. (Author/AEF)

Language: English

Published: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Jan 1981

Article

Peace Profile: Maria Montessori – Peace Through Education

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Peace Review: A Journal of Social Justice, vol. 26, no. 3

Pages: 427-433

Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Peace, Peace education

See More

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/10402659.2014.938003

ISSN: 1040-2659

Article

Education Shapes the Structure of Semantic Memory and Impacts Creative Thinking

Available from: npj Science of Learning

Publication: npj Science of Learning, vol. 6, no. 1

Pages: Article 35

Comparative education, Europe, Knowledge acquisition, Learning, Montessori method of education, Neuroscience, Switzerland, Western Europe

See More

Abstract/Notes: Education is central to the acquisition of knowledge, such as when children learn new concepts. It is unknown, however, whether educational differences impact not only what concepts children learn, but how those concepts come to be represented in semantic memory—a system that supports higher cognitive functions, such as creative thinking. Here we leverage computational network science tools to study hidden knowledge structures of 67 Swiss schoolchildren from two distinct educational backgrounds—Montessori and traditional, matched on socioeconomic factors and nonverbal intelligence—to examine how educational experience shape semantic memory and creative thinking. We find that children experiencing Montessori education show a more flexible semantic network structure (high connectivity/short paths between concepts, less modularity) alongside higher scores on creative thinking tests. The findings indicate that education impacts how children represent concepts in semantic memory and suggest that different educational experiences can affect higher cognitive functions, including creative thinking.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1038/s41539-021-00113-8

ISSN: 2056-7936

Conference Paper

From Pedagogical Principles to the Pedagogical Project: The Experience of San Michele Educational Garden

Available from: IATED Digital Library

15th International Technology, Education and Development Conference

Europe, Italy, Southern Europe

See More

Abstract/Notes: The paper presents the results of theoretical and experimental research developed as part of the "Mitigation Risk Design" (MiRiDe) Workshop, provided by the School of Architecture, Urban Planning, Construction Engineering of the Politecnico di Milano on the theme of enhancing school spaces starting from participated projects (owner and designer enter into dialogue with users: teachers, children , parents and grandparents, attendants). The resumption of face-to-face teaching activities starting from last September (interrupted in February to activate health measures to contrast the spread of Covid-19) required a rethinking of the psycho-pedagogical dynamics and the training spaces. Starting from the National Guidelines implemented by the Italian Federation of Nursery Schools and following the pedagogical coordination meetings, it became clear the need to promote manipulative activities oriented to the personal experience of each child and to encourage collective and cooperative activities able to guarantee an adequate interpersonal distancing. The work underlines the most important phases of the experimentation started at the "San Michele" Kindergarten in Bellinzago Lombardo (Milan), which developed a participatory project on the theme of "Guarding and Cultivating" through the design of an educational garden. The paper is organized into five sections. The first section presents the San Michele school context, retracing its history and investigating the new needs due to the health emergency. The second section presents the multi-disciplinary research about the pedagogical principles underlying cultivation activities. Starting from the concise presentation of different cultural orientations, the work outlines the training features that characterize the experience of the garden in relation to the growth of the child. The third section explains how, from the identification of "good pedagogical practices", PEDAGOGICAL PRINCIPLES have been defined for the San Michele Garden. The project, inspired by Montessori pedagogy, highlights how the child needs to experience nature and not just study it. Contact with nature, sensory exploration, manual skills, manipulation, imitation of adult life are just some of the experiential activities that lend themselves to an educational space such as the didactic garden. The fourth section summarizes the research that emerged from the comparative analysis with training projects on the theme of cultivating the educational garden. Through maps, summary sheets, and thematic insights, the elements necessary for the construction of a pedagogical project for the educational garden are outlined. The fifth section presents the EDUCATIONAL PROJECT for the San Michele Garden, indicating the educational objectives, the training actions, and the analysis of "pilot experiences" capable of testing the effectiveness of the project. The conclusions underline how the phase of "pedagogical design" constitutes a significant step for the subsequent "architectural design". It will make it possible to modify spaces (starting from the tools of architecture), making them places marked by anthropological experiences for all the people who will inhabit the educational garden.

Language: English

Published: Online Conference: International Academy of Technology, Education and Development (IATED), 2021

Pages: 9222-9232

DOI: 10.21125/inted.2021.1926

ISBN: 978-84-09-27666-0

Article

The Children Shall Teach Them: Good Things Happen When High School Students Observe a Montessori Preschool

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 19, no. 1

Pages: 1, 20

Public Montessori

See More

Abstract/Notes: Ballard High School, Seattle, Washington

Language: English

Article

Historiando a Montessori: desde el feminismo y socialismo utópico hacia su compromiso como pionera del holismo [Telling the Montessori story: from feminism and utopic socialism towards her compromise with cosmic education and conscious cultural evolution]

Available from: Universidad de Costa Rica - Portal de Revistas Académicas

Publication: Actualidades Investigativas en Educación, vol. 12, no. 3

Pages: 1-33

, educación global

See More

Abstract/Notes: El presente ensayo indaga acerca de las raíces de la educación montessoriana, pionera de concepciones holistas. Como resultado, se evidencia que únicamente puede ser abordada desde un paradigma de la complejidad y del compromiso con el destino de la humanidad. Solo una comprensión más amplia de su teleología, antropología y epistemología, nos proporcionará la perspectiva que permita integrar estas dimensiones. Con una introducción que parte de la primera costarricense en poner en práctica su filosofía, la preclara Carmen Lyra, se aborda la multi-texualidad, complejidad y trasdisciplinareidad de Montessori, así como sus contingencias y su época, indagación necesaria para sopesar su necesidad hoy. A search for Montessori’s roots concludes that an authentic Montessori education, pioneer in holistic conceptions, can only be addressed from a paradigm of complexity, a Transdisciplinary perspective, and an attitude of compromise with the destiny of humanity. Only an all-encompassing understanding of her teleology, anthropology, and epistemology will provide a perspective to integrate these dimensions. In relating Montessori’s circumstances and life-experiences, a parallel is made to the challenges faced by the first practicing Montessorian in Costa Rica, Carmen Lyra, educator, writer, activist, and founding-member of the Costa Rican Communist Party. Montessori’s multi-texuality, contingencies and the quotidien are addressed in an effort to outline her relevance today.

Language: Spanish

DOI: 10.15517/aie.v12i3.10298

ISSN: 1409-4703

Article

Estimulación multisensorial temprana desde la metodología Montessori: Reflexiones para su aplicación en condiciones de distanciamiento social

Available from: Conciencia Digital

Publication: ConcienciaDigital, vol. 4, no. 1

Pages: 78-104

Americas, Ecuador, Latin America and the Caribbean, Montessori method of education, South America

See More

Abstract/Notes: Introduction: Among the most important priorities is early childhood care. With the arrival of COVID 19, this has been greatly affected, causing the need to rethink it in different ways. In the educational context, due to social distancing, it has caused having to migrate from the face-to-face mode to the online one. Objective: To reflect on the feasibility of the Montessori Methodology, for the multisensory stimulation of children with or without special educational needs, in conditions of social distancing. Methodology: The study followed a descriptive, non-experimental methodology, through the use of theoretical and empirical methods and the RSL (Systematic Review of Literature), allowed to consult 46 sources obtaining as Results: The identification of 13 potential studies that contributed to systematize the foundations theoretical on the feasibility of the Montessori Methodology, facilitating the realization of 4 essential theories: 1. Diagnosis relationship with the Intervention process at an early age. 2. The multisensory stimulation base of the infantile development. 3. Teaching materials and resources favor significant learning and the integral development of the child. Early multisensory stimulation of children with special educational needs associated or not with disability in conditions of social distancing is a permanent challenge. Conclusions: The systematization of the preceding theories around the Montessori Methodology highlights its feasibility, relevance and applicability for early multisensory stimulation in children with or without special educational needs, however limitations are evident due to the few studies carried out in relation to its applicability in conditions of social isolation, to this is added the need for training and preparation of teaching staff and the family context for its optimization, as well as the migration of face-to-face pedagogical models to virtual pedagogical models

Language: Spanish

DOI: 10.33262/concienciadigital.v4i1.1529

ISSN: 2600-5859

Advanced Search