Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

386 results

Article

Montessori Junior High School Students’ Perceptions on Their Self-Efficacy in Reading

Available from: Universitas Islam Negeri Sunan Ampel Surabaya Digital Library

Publication: IJET (Indonesian Journal of English Teaching), vol. 8, no. 2

Pages: 26-37

Asia, Australasia, Indonesia, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, Perceptions, Southeast Asia

See More

Abstract/Notes: Montessori approach deals with learning in independence and liberty. This way of learning requires students to explore information based on their learning interest. Therefore, reading has become one of the keys in learning successfully in a Montessori school. Moreover, the impact of self-efficacy on the learning outcomes has been explored in the educational psychology as a field of study. This study inspects students’ self-efficacy perceptions and their factors in reading comprehension in a Montessori Junior High School registered in 2018-2019 academic year. It is located in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. English is the main language used in the teaching-learning process in the school. The study is conducted by using mixed method. Findings are based on the 27 close-ended questions and three open-ended questions obtained from the students in grade seven and eight. In analyzing the results, concurrent triangulation strategy is applied. The results show that the students have positive self-efficacy perceptions on their reading (Average= 3.449/5), especially in reading, explaining, summarizing texts and comprehending the graphics found in the text without the guidance of their teachers. Their self-efficacy sources are found in their mastery experiences, vicarious experiences, verbal persuasion, and emotional and psychological states.

Language: English

DOI: 10.15642/ijet2.2019.8.2.26-37

ISSN: 2548-6497

Article

Help the Child to Develop Independence and Relate Him to Reality [part 2 of 2]

Publication: MANO Newsletter [Montessori Association of Northern Ohio]

Pages: 2

Americas, Montessori Association of Northern Ohio (MANO) - Periodicals, North America, United States of America, ⛔ No DOI found

See More

Language: English

Article

Your Montessori Child at Home [part 1 of 2]

Publication: MANO Newsletter [Montessori Association of Northern Ohio]

Pages: 1, 4

Americas, Montessori Association of Northern Ohio (MANO) - Periodicals, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America, ⛔ No DOI found

See More

Language: English

Book

Montessori Education

Australasia, Australia and New Zealand, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - History, New Zealand, Oceania

See More

Language: English

Published: Dunedin, New Zealand: [s.n.], 1979

Article

A Guide to the Montessori Method [book review]

Available from: HathiTrust

Publication: Journal of Education (Boston), vol. 77, no. 25

Pages: 706

Book reviews, ⛔ No DOI found

See More

Language: English

ISSN: 0022-0574, 2515-5741

Article

The Conflicting Pedagogy of Maria Montessori

Available from: HathiTrust

Publication: Journal of Education (Boston), vol. 77

Pages: 147-149

Maria Montessori - Biographic sources, Maria Montessori - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

See More

Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/002205741307700604

ISSN: 0022-0574, 2515-5741

Doctoral Dissertation

Promotion of Peace and Peace Education Through Schooling: Perspectives and Experiences of Girls and Boys in Mauritius

Available from: British Library - EthOS

Africa, East Africa, Mauritius, Peace education, Sub-Saharan Africa

See More

Abstract/Notes: This thesis explores young boys' and girls' perceptions and experiences of their schooling in the small island developing state of Mauritius. It brings to the forefront problems related to cultural and structural violence that can hamper a peaceful schooling in three state secondary schools: a single-sex girls' school, a single-sex boys' school and a mixed school which also promote the educational theories of M. K. Gandhi and Rabindranath Tagore. The findings reveal that there can be a 'fideistic' attitude to Gandhi and Tagore in this context, which highlight the need for a critical peace education that question taken-for-granted assumptions. It also shows that in schools, problems can be hidden and not discussed. The methodology was based on a participatory worldview that asserts the importance of a 'holistic inquiry' and learning from the 'Other' for peaceful coexistence. In this regard, there can be serious ethical challenges for a 'native' researcher to conduct participatory research with young people in a small-connected community like Mauritius. The research also brings together various philosophies of education and peace for the promotion of peace education. It builds on commonalities from the East and West to highlight the importance of the 'holistic' in peace education. It promotes the concept of 'wholeness' as much emphasised in the East. The research was informed by M.K. Gandhi's, Rabindranath Tagore's and Maria Montessori's educational theories for peace. It was also gender-sensitive and promoted a 'peace-focused-feminism', which is grounded in the Eastern philosophies of 'Yin' and 'Yang', 'Shakti' and 'Shiva' and 'Prakriti' and 'Purusha'.

Language: English

Published: Nottingham, England, 2018

Article

Cognitive Performance in Montessori and Nursery School Children

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: The Journal of Educational Research, vol. 62, no. 9

Pages: 411-416

Americas, Cognition, Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

See More

Abstract/Notes: Cognitive performance was measured in fourteen pairs of children, matched in social class, CA, sex and IQ, selected from a Montessori and from a “traditional” nursery school. No differences were found between the parents in these schools on such measures of social and parental attitudes and behavior as: achievement orientation, traditional family ideology, dogmatism, anomie, parental control behavior, or task oriented vs. person oriented values. The nursery school children were significantly more creative on a measure of non-verbal creativity, were more socially oriented, and less task oriented than the Montessori children.Style of approach to tests was felt to be a critical outcome of the two educational environments. The Montessori children used significantly more physical characteristics to describe commonplace objects, whereas significantly more functional terms were used by the nursery school children in their descriptions. Montessori children’s drawings had people present significantly less often and geometric forms significantly more often than the nursery school children’s drawings.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/00220671.1969.10883885

ISSN: 0022-0671

Article

Psychological Tests for Every Child

Publication: Times Educational Supplement (London), no. 4402

Pages: 14

Europe, Montenegro, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Serbia, Southern Europe, Yugoslavia

See More

Abstract/Notes: Focuses on the proposed psychological tests for school children selected to attend a Montessori school in Yugoslavia. Concerns over the number of children in the country who suffer from the psychological illnesses caused by the Balkan War; Range of tests proposed by educators.

Language: English

ISSN: 0040-7887

Article

Multilingualism in a Montessori Preschool: A Study of Language Variability in a Linguistically Diverse Preschool Programme

Available from: IndianJournals

Publication: Journal of Exclusion Studies, vol. 9, no. 2

Pages: 111-131

Asia, Bilingualism, India, Multilingualism, South Asia

See More

Abstract/Notes: This article is based on a study of an ‘English-medium’ preschool programme for underprivileged children. The diverse linguistic backgrounds of the teachers and students prompted an enquiry into how multiple languages would be negotiated in the setting and how comprehension, learning and communication would occur given that none of the children came from English-speaking homes. The article identifies and interprets key features of verbal language that were observed in the setting and articulates implications for educational practice.

Language: English

DOI: 10.5958/2231-4555.2019.00009.3

ISSN: 2231-4547, 2231-4555

Advanced Search