Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

386 results

Article

The State of Geographic Education in Selected Elementary Schools in Metro Manila, Philippines

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education, vol. 17, no. 4

Pages: 344-357

Asia, Philippines, Southeast Asia

See More

Abstract/Notes: The article presents the state of geographic education in Manila, Philippines by examining the types of approaches in teaching geography in public, private and Montessori schools. As part of the social studies programme in Grade IV elementary education, the types of approaches to teaching geography are examined for their effectiveness and relevance to teaching geographic concepts. Two curricular programmes were considered in the assessment of the importance of using the right kind of instructional materials in learning geographic concepts in elementary education. These programmes are (a) the basic education curriculum (BEC) that is prescribed by the Department of Education and (b) the curriculum followed by the Montessori education philosophy. Initial findings indicate that there was a significant difference in the achievement scores of Old Balara Elementary School (public) and Seed Montessori with that of Roosevelt Elementary School (private). While achievement scores were higher when instructional materials were readily available to students, this does not necessarily mean that the availability of instructional materials by itself is the key in the attainment of high scores. The content must be anchored on the local setting where students have their immediate experience in order for achievement scores to improve. This study provides a tentative first look at the implications of curriculum and instructional material for educators, school authorities and government policymakers in strengthening and reorienting geographic education under the social studies programme in the Philippine context.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/10382040802560402

ISSN: 1038-2046

Doctoral Dissertation

The Impact of Montessori Teaching on Academic Achievement of Elementary School Students in a Central Texas School District: A Causal-Comparative Inquiry

Available from: Texas A&M University

See More

Abstract/Notes: Providing a meaningful and experiential learning environment for all students has long created a concern for alternate ways to teach students who are reportedly demonstrating non-mastery on state standardized assessments. As the benchmark for showing successful academic achievement increases, so does the need for discovering effective ways for students to learn. The Montessori teaching method has been in existence since the early 1900s when Dr. Montessori made her discovery of the student learning process. Dr. Montessori connected to the laws of nature and the environment for creating students who are problem-solvers with critical-thinking skills. The Montessori Method is designed to promote independent learning and support normal development in children. A Montessori lesson is defined as any interaction between an adult and a child; it incorporates techniques that are defined to serve as guidance for the adult personality in working with the child. The study investigated the impact of Montessori Method on the academic achievement of 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade students. The State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to measure academic achievement in reading and mathematics. An ex post facto, causal-comparative design was employed. The characteristic-present samples consisted of 47 3rd, 40 4th, and 44 5th graders. There were 71 3rd, 60 4th, and 49 5th graders in the comparison samples. Due to non-probability nature of the sampling technique, external validity was limited to study participants. Due to non-experimental nature of the study, no causal inferences were drawn. A series of Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) showed that there were no statistically significant differences between the students who received the Montessori Method of instruction and those who did not on the basis of the outcome measures of academic achievement in reading and mathematics. The mean difference effect sizes, which were used to examine the practical significance of the findings, ranged from negligible to small. Although the results of the study did not support the hypothesis, it must be pointed out that the Montessori Method of teaching facilitates self-paced learning that promotes a child's independence and encourages decision-making which are instrumental in becoming successful learners. Additionally, Montessori advocates experiences that are "real-world" and allow children to build intrinsic motivational opportunities; therefore, creating independent thinkers that will be competitive problem-solvers in the global economy of the 21st century. The limited studies on the Montessori Method of teaching offer opportunities for further investigation at all grade levels. For example, it is recommended to conduct a study to compare students who receive Montessori education during the early years of their academic life with those who receive Montessori education from pre-k to high school graduation. Because the Montessori name does not have a trademark, there are opportunities for investigating Montessori teacher preparation and comparing the preparation of the teachers to the standardized assessment results. There are also opportunities for investigating the method and curriculum used at schools that carry the name Montessori for comparison purposes amongst Montessori schools as well as in comparison to the results of the standardized assessments at these schools.

Language: English

Published: Corpus Christi, Texas, 2013

Article

Effects of Montessori's Cylinder Block Training on the Acquisition of Conservation

Available from: APA PsycNET

Publication: Developmental Psychology, vol. 2, no. 1

Pages: 156

See More

Abstract/Notes: Assessed whether Montessori's "cylinder block training hinders or facilitates" the acquisition of conservation using 32 kindergarten children. Ss were trained with Montessori blocks, while controls worked with jigsaw puzzles. "From pre- to posttest, conservation scores" of the Ss "decreased (5.75 to 4.80) while those of the control group increased (5.75 to 7.08)." It was found that the difference between the posttest scores of the 2 groups was significant. It is concluded that cylinder block training does not facilitate conservation and may hinder it.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1037/h0028610

ISSN: 1939-0599, 0012-1649

Honors Thesis

The Seneca Language and Bilingual Road Signs: A Study in the Sociology of an Indigenous Language

Available from: Ohio State University - Knowledge Bank

Americas, Bilingualism, Indigenous communities, North America, North America, United States of America

See More

Abstract/Notes: One of the fundamental types of human rights concerns collective-developmental rights which allow minorities to use heritage languages and practices without external interference (Vašák 1977). The protected status of minority language rights is a critical part of language revitalization in which speakers of heritage languages, faced with the encroachment of more socially, politically, and economically dominant languages, embark on vigorous programs to ensure the survival and continued usage of their language. The Five Nations Iroquoian language, Seneca, has just a few remaining speech communities and a variety of ongoing language revitalization initiatives (Mithun 2012). To revitalize their traditional language, community classes through the Seneca Language Department and the Faithkeepers Montessori School Seneca Language Nest for young speakers have concentrated their efforts on preserving Onöndowa'ga:' Gawë:nö' the indigenous name for the Seneca language (Bowen 2020, Murray 2015). In the public sphere, a push by the Seneca Nation of Indians Department of Transportation fulfilling the intent of the federal Native American Tourism and Improving Visitor Experience (NATIVE) Act enacted in 2016, specifically included bilingual signs for state roads running through indigenous land in addition to other significant components (Figura 2016). In an area whose geographic names are strongly connected to Iroquoian languages including Seneca, these bilingual signs represent more public and visible Seneca language presence and stand as symbols of language revitalization. The place names and information that appear on the signs have considerable significance for community identity as well as linguistic and economic impacts, among others. Through oral histories collected from Seneca Nation members and language advocates in addition to a representative from the New York State Department of Transportation, this study pursues an analysis of the Seneca public usage of their heritage language and the various language revitalization efforts occurring among indigenous and minority communities internationally. As the COVID-19 pandemic threatens already vulnerable populations, heritage languages that have been historically oppressed face a global language crisis that disproportionately harms and disadvantages speakers of heritage and minority languages (Roche 2020). While the language of road signs may seem mundane, this study reveals how the Seneca bilingual signs play a significant role in awareness of indigenous territory and consequently stimulation of the local economy as well as supporting language learning, revitalization, and de-stigmatization. Primarily through the efforts of the Seneca community, the bilingual signs represent the expression of language rights in the public sphere and one part of the ongoing language revitalization.

Language: English

Published: Columbus, Ohio, 2021

Article

Education for Tomorrow: The Vision of Rabindranath Tagore

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Asian Studies Review, vol. 40, no. 1

Pages: 1-16

Asia, India, Rabindranath Tagore, Rabindranath Tagore - Biographic sources, Santiniketan (India), South Asia, Sriniketan (India), Viśva Bhāratī

See More

Abstract/Notes: This article investigates Rabindranath Tagore’s educational vision, which underpinned the three institutions he set up in India – Santiniketan (1901), Visva-Bharati (1921) and Sriniketan (1922). It argues that this vision is still relevant for the world of today and tomorrow, and that it should be taken into account in designing any educational model for the future. Tagore rejected the modern mechanical learning that focuses merely on cultivation of the individual’s mind, in favour of learning that encourages the creativity, imagination and moral awareness of students. He believed that education should be not for mere “success” or “progress” but for “illumination of heart” and for inculcation of a spirit of sympathy, service and self-sacrifice in the individual, so that s/he could rise above egocentrism and ethnocentrism to a state of global consciousness or worldcentrism. In pursuing this argument, I refer to Tagore’s letters, lectures, interviews and essays, both in Bengali and in English, a body of his short stories, his novel The Home and the World and his allegorical poem “Two Birds”. I also explain his awareness of the educational movements of his time in the West, and draw brief parallels with selected Western luminaries in the field, such as Plato, Montaigne, Rousseau and John Dewey. My contention is that although some may dismiss Tagore’s educational principles as “rickety sentimentalism” in a world that is palpable and real, his ideas of human fellowship, unity and creativity, and kinship for nature seem irrefutable with the rise of multiculturalism and the looming ecological crisis threatening world peace.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/10357823.2015.1125441

ISSN: 1035-7823

Article

The Montessori Training Centre for Village Schools in Yeotmal, Madhya Pradesh, India

Publication: Around the Child, vol. 3

Pages: 76-79

Asia, India, South Asia, Training, ⛔ No DOI found

See More

Language: English

ISSN: 0571-1142

Doctoral Dissertation

Educational Ideas and Practices of Rabindranath Tagore and Maria Montessori: A Comparative Analysis

Available from: Shodhganga: Indian Theses

Asia, India, Rabindranath Tagore, South Asia

See More

Abstract/Notes: Rabindranath Tagore and Maria Montessori were two great educationists of the two continents of the world. This study compared the ideals and practices of both these pioneers in the field of education. The objectives of the study were to analyze the similarities and differences in the educational philosophies of Rabindranath Tagore and Maria Montessori, to study the aims, curriculum and methods of education as propounded by them and to find out the relevance of their educational doctrines in the present day education system. Methodology: A philosophical and historical research was conducted by the researcher. The data were collected from the various primary and secondary sources. The collected data were analyzed by ensuring the internal and external criticism of the various sources. Findings of the Study: Tagore and Montessori’s educational thoughts were inspired by the static conditions of the then prevalent traditional educational systems. Their pedagogical approaches stressed on the needs and interests of the child. Rabindranath Tagore’s approach towards evolution of an educational philosophy was his vision as a poet and his institution was an extension of his work of art. Maria Montessori’s educational theory was based on science and her institution was a pedagogical laboratory for her. Rabindranath Tagore’s poetic vision enabled him to devise a unique learning environment at Santiniketan based on the concept of ancient Indian ideals. Rabindranath asserted his mission to promote global peace and universal brotherhood through the creation of Visva-Bharati. Through Sriniketan Tagore tried to address the needs of rural India. Maria Montessori through scientific observation evolved learning materials in a classroom environment that fostered children’s natural desire to learn from ‘Children’s House’. She developed the Montessori Method, which was eventually adopted throughout the world. Living through the years of violent war and political upheaval, also inspired her to espouse the cause of peace education. The conclusion that the researcher could draw from the study was that though the educational practices of both these educators were different, there are many parallel ideas in their educational ideals and thoughts. Their innovative methods of teaching are still relevant in the present day education.

Language: English

Published: Kolkata, India, 2017

Book Section

From Montessori to Culturally Relevant Schools Under the Trees in Kenya

Available from: Springer Link

Book Title: Common Characteristics and Unique Qualities in Preschool Programs: Global Perspectives in Early Childhood Education

Pages: 23-35

Africa, Culturally relevant pedagogy, East Africa, Kenya, Sub-Saharan Africa

See More

Abstract/Notes: Kenya distinguishes itself from other sub-Saharan African countries with its well-established system of early childhood development and education (ECDE). This chapter describes environmental, economic and social-cultural circumstances in Kenya and how these affect ECDE program design, curriculum and preschool activities. The author will provide a brief historical overview of early childhood educational contexts in Kenya and how preschool teachers meet minimum standards of a quality program using Guidelines for Early Childhood Development in Kenya (NACECE (National Center for Early Childhood Education). (2003). Guidelines for early childhood development in Kenya. Nairobi: Author.) with an African approach. Specific focus will be given to the diverse and contrasting program settings for early childhood care and education from the affluent city suburbs to the rural agrarian farms and the arid and semi arid (ASAL) areas of Kenya.

Language: English

Published: Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2013

ISBN: 978-94-007-4972-6 978-94-007-4971-9

Series: Educating the Young Child

Article

Integration of peace education into early childhood education programs

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: International Journal of Early Childhood, vol. 28, no. 2

Pages: 29-36

Peace education

See More

Abstract/Notes: Preschool educators may observe that this unique historical period is an opportunity to integrate peace education into the educational program. The communication that has developed thanks to new technology has offered the opportunity for transformation. Teaching, nonviolence, conflict resolution, well-being, economic, political participation and interest in the environment can be considered as concepts of education for peace. This visionary idea includes global education, prevention of violence, character education and moral education. The educational program and methods of education for peace of preschool children (from birth to 8 years old) include different themes: 1) promote cooperation and resolve conflicts 2) respect for self and authority; 3) appreciation of diversity 4) the role of permeating cultural violence including television, video games, films and dramatic games stimulated by toys and representations of violent actions. These central themes contain the hope that the principles contained in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child will be applied. Parents' participation seen as essential agents in decision-making concerning their children is a fundamental concept. The study of this event produced a visionary model, identified as education for peace, with the participation of parents. OMEP members act as catalysts for peace education efforts with an emphasis on intercultural education. Peace education was, is and will be a goal of pre-school and primary education for all educators around the world. There is a great need for activities in preschool, primary and other educational programs to reduce tensions peacefully.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/BF03174500

ISSN: 0020-7187, 1878-4658

Article

Women’s Role in Early Childhood Education in Europe

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: International Journal of Early Childhood, vol. 25, no. 1

Pages: 67-75

Europe, Feminism

See More

Abstract/Notes: The history of education is mainly a history of male educators and their ideas and systems of education, whereas the history of early childhood education is to a large extent a field of history where women have been the actors and to some extent also the writers about early childhood education. But this history is coloured by the withdrawn and to a large degree subordinate status of women, which is also reflected in the way history is written: A history of invisibility and anonymity, which also may have affected the place early childhood education has had in general educational history...

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/BF03174635

ISSN: 0020-7187, 1878-4658

Advanced Search