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851 results

Article

A Language Arts Program for Pre-First-Grade Children: Two-Year Achievement Report

Publication: American Montessori Society Bulletin, vol. 9, no. 4

Pages: 1-32

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Language: English

ISSN: 0277-9064

Article

Summer Study-Conference on Music and Language [July-August, 1961]

Publication: Communications (Association Montessori Internationale, 195?-2008), vol. 1960, no. 3/4

Pages: 36

Conferences, Trainings

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Language: English

ISSN: 0519-0959

Article

Our Experience in Giving Kannada as First Language

Publication: The Child and You, vol. 11

Pages: 30-31

Asia, India, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, South Asia

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Language: English

Book

Kreative Sprachförderung nach Maria Montessori [Creative Language Support According to Maria Montessori]

Language acquisition, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Abstract/Notes: Diese in der Montessori-Praxis entwickelten und bewährten Spiele und Übungen regen den kreativen Umgang mit Sprache an. Die erfahrene Autorin zeigt unterschiedlichste Möglichkeiten auf, wie Kinder für Sprache sensibilisiert und zum freien Schreiben anregt werden. Eine Ideenfundgrube für die Weiterentwicklung der mündlichen und schriftlichen Ausdrucksfähigkeit. [These games and exercises, developed and proven in Montessori practice, encourage creative use of language. The experienced author shows a wide variety of ways in which children can be sensitized to language and encouraged to write freely. A treasure trove of ideas for the further development of oral and written expression.]

Language: German

Published: Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany: Herder, 2013

ISBN: 978-3-451-32675-2 3-451-32675-2

Series: Montessori-Praxis (Herder)

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Second Language Corner for Children’s House: A Practitioner–Researcher Journey Into Bilingualism in Montessori Education

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 7, no. 1

Pages: 67-82

Americas, Bilingualism, Central America, Latin America and the Caribbean, Mexico, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: This work reports, from a qualitative research perspective, the development of an English Corner project for a preschool Children’s House classroom in central Mexico over the course of a 3-year period. It shows the transition of a language specialist over six consecutive periods of work, from a traditional understanding and practice of teaching English as a second language to young learners into a more comprehensive one of the Montessori Method. The analysis of my own practice is used to recover insights through a reflective process with the intention to develop a second language (L2) Montessori program for 3- to 6-year-olds that aligns better with Montessori pedagogy.  Variables such as instruction time, setting, group constitution, materials, and teaching and learning strategies allowed for certain aspects to arise as leading points of interest for the focus of the analysis and the methodological and pedagogical adaptations that followed each period. This paper is an attempt to fill the gap between the need to deliver a second language effectively in Montessori education and the lack of guidance for doing it the Montessori way; it is especially for practitioners who do not have a Montessori background but also for Montessori-trained teachers for whom more specific preparation would aid their practice. I also hope to stimulate further research in the field of second language acquisition and multilingualism in Montessori education at every level of education.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v7i1.13401

ISSN: 2378-3923

Book

Pädagogik aus Religion? Theologische Sprache und Religion bei Montessori und in der Religionspädagogischen Montessorirezeption [Pedagogy from Religion? Theological Language and Religion in Montessori and in the Reception of Montessori in Religious Education]

Montessori method of education, Religious education

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Abstract/Notes: This is the author's dissertation (Pädagogische Hochschule Weingarten, 2015).

Language: German

Published: Berlin, Germany: LIT, 2016

ISBN: 978-3-643-13258-1 3-643-13258-1

Series: Ökumenische Religionspädagogik , 9

of 2

Doctoral Dissertation

Comparison of the Application of Maria Montessori's Language Arts Ideas and Practices in Two Periods of Development in the United States: 1909-1921 and 1953-1963

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

Americas, Classroom environments, Montessori materials, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - Teachers, Montessori schools, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Maria Montessori's work is intimately grounded in her detailed teaching practices and the logic of their sequence, along with their underlying ideas and values, particularly in the area of language arts. There are no studies, however, which comprehensively analyze her language arts curriculum for children from three to seven as it was applied by the practitioners who fostered, interpreted, and promoted her work in America in periods of its popularity: 1909-1921 and 1953-1963. This lack of comprehensive analysis blurs the fundamental identity and contextual coherence of Montessori's work and obscures the significant and ongoing contribution made to American education through her language arts curriculum. An analysis of Montessori's published work and those written about her was made in order to achieve a description of her language arts curriculum for the purpose of comparing her work to that of her American sponsors. To determine how Montessori's curriculum was interpreted and applied, the literature on the history of the Montessori movement was reviewed and five leaders were identified: Ann George, Alexander Graham Bell, Clara Craig, Helen Parkhurst, and Nancy McCormick Rambusch. Their writings and other primary sources were analyzed with reference to Montessori's curriculum. In some cases interviews were conducted and Montessori classrooms were observed over an extended period of time. The analysis of the activity of the leaders, within their contemporary social and educational settings revealed how Montessori's curriculum became detached from her original experimental context and was reshaped because of lack of understanding or of agreement with the systematic purpose of her educational material in the development of language arts skills, and because of varying intentions and views on how and what children should learn. The findings of the study also contribute to existing studies on the reasons for the decline of Montessori's practices by the end of the first period, and for success in the revival of her work in the second period. In addition, conclusions contribute to the unified body of knowledge needed to thoroughly identify the Montessori educational model practiced and researched by educators.

Language: English

Published: Durham, North Carolina, 1984

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

The Effects of High-Stakes Testing on Secondary Language Arts Curriculum and Instruction

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: High-stakes testing has become mandatory since the reauthorization of the Elementary Secondary Educational Act, 2001 with its No Child Left Behind (NCLB) provisions. Beginning with the 2005-06 school year, students in grades K-8 must be tested yearly in reading and math. Students in secondary schools must be tested once in reading and math. Student scores at all grade levels are then used as part of the formula for determining whether or not a school retains its accreditation or is placed on a "needs improvement" list. Being identified as "needs improvement" for three consecutive years carries an assortment of serious consequences for schools. As a result of these high-stakes tests, secondary language arts teachers are expected to prepare students for state reading assessments. Studies have investigated the effects high-stakes testing has on elementary and secondary curriculum and instruction but have not focused specifically on secondary language arts teachers. Therefore, this study focuses on the effects high-stakes testing is having on secondary language arts' curriculum and instruction. Six high school junior English teachers from a Midwestern state were surveyed and interviewed. Five of the teachers also participated in a focus group discussion. From this data several common themes emerged including a narrowing of their curricula and a loss of instructional time to test preparation and the actual administration of the tests. In addition, teachers expressed feelings of inadequacy about their knowledge of effective pedagogy for improving adolescent reading skills. From this study it becomes clear that secondary language arts teachers need more information on best practices for working with adolescents and improving adolescent reading skills while incorporating the state reading standards and maintaining a meaningful curriculum and engaging instructional strategies. Administrators and state departments of education need to consider ways to provide useful in-services on reading for secondary teachers. In addition, university teacher education programs need to prepare future teachers and offer teachers who are currently in the classroom assistance in developing effective strategies for teaching reading skills to adolescents which will keep the students engaged.

Language: English

Published: Lawrence, Kansas, 2005

Article

Man's Spiritual Expressions: Language and Music

Publication: Communications (Association Montessori Internationale, 195?-2008), vol. 1986, no. 1

Pages: 2–5

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Language: English

ISSN: 0519-0959

Article

Helping the Child in the Conquest of the Written Language

Available from: Stadsarchief Amsterdam (Amsterdam City Archives)

Publication: Around the Child, vol. 5

Pages: 7-12

Albert Max Joosten - Writings, Language acquisition

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Language: English

ISSN: 0571-1142

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