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437 results

Article

A Comparison of Reading and Math Achievement for African American Third Grade Students in Montessori and Other Magnet Schools

Available from: JSTOR

Publication: Journal of Negro Education, vol. 86, no. 4

Pages: 439-448

Academic achievement, African American community, African Americans, Americas, Comparative education, Lower elementary, Mathematics - Academic achievement, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, Reading - Academic achievement, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori programs are expanding in public schools, serving a large proportion of African American students. Although recent Montessori research has focused on diverse public school populations, few studies have examined outcomes for African American students at the lower elementary level. This quasi-experimental study compares reading and math achievement for African American third grade students in public Montessori and other magnet schools in a large, urban district in North Carolina. Scores from end-of-grade state tests of reading and math are compared using a multivariate analysis of covariance. No significant difference in math scores was identified, but students in Montessori schools scored significantly higher in reading. This suggests that Montessori lower elementary instruction may be beneficial for African American students.

Language: English

DOI: 10.7709/jnegroeducation.86.4.0439

ISSN: 0022-2984

Doctoral Dissertation

Does Parental Involvement Matter? A Comparison of the Effects of Two Different Types of Parental Involvement on Urban Elementary Students' Academic Performance

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: This mixed method study seeks to utilize a comparative analysis to explore the impacts of two types of parental involvement in urban elementary school students’ academic performance. Epstein’s (1995) widely cited typology describes six different types of parental involvement, and this typology serves as a framework for this study. More specifically, this study compares learning at home and collaborating with community, as parent involvement types, to student academic performance. The study utilizes descriptive statistics and correlational analyses to compare parent-reported student performance via a survey instrument and semi-structured focus group interviews to collect narrative data. Parental involvement has been vigorously studied over the last two decades, however, not much data appears to address how collaborating with the community, as a form of involvement, influences student performance and other studies provide an ambiguous picture for learning at home as another parenting type. Furthermore, there is evidence that direct-action parent organizing, as a parental involvement form of collaborating with the community, may impact educational outcomes and this study examines these research areas. After analyzing the data, the researcher did not find evidence of a significant relationship between learning at home and parent-reported student academic performance. However, the study did reveal a significant association between parents who were collaborating with the community and the parent-reported academic performance of their children. This moderate correlation from an often overlooked parenting type, collaborating with the community, may harbor rich findings within the literature and point to the need for greater scrutiny herein. In fact, this provides a warrant for additional research to explore the “efficacy” of collaborating with community as a type of parental involvement that significantly influences positive student academic performance.

Language: English

Published: Baltimore, Maryland, 2018

Article

Self-Esteem and Academic Anxiety of High School Students with Montessori and Traditional Method of Education

Available from: Informatics Publishing Ltd

Publication: Indian Journal of Health and Wellbeing, vol. 7, no. 5

Pages: 543-545

Asia, India, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori Method of education focuses on students overall development. Montessori Method of education is designed not only to focus on academic skills of the students but also it gives importance for the development of the student's social and behavioral skills. Hence the present study aimed to assess the self-esteem and academic anxiety of students with Montessori and traditional method of education. It was hypothesized that the students of Montessori Method of education have higher self-esteem and lower academic anxiety compared to traditional method of education. In order to verify the above hypothesis a sample of 124 students were selected from the schools which offer education with Montessori (N=60) and traditional method (N=64). Tools used for the study were the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and Academic Anxiety Scale for Children developed by Singh and Sen Gupta. The collected data were subjected to `t` analysis and the major findings of the study revealed that the students of Montessori Method of education has significantly higher self-esteem and significantly lower academic anxiety compared to traditional school students.

Language: English

ISSN: 2321-3698

Article

Academic Environments in Preschool: Do They Pressure or Challenge Young Children

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Early Education and Development, vol. 1, no. 6

Pages: 401-423

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Abstract/Notes: The question of whether early academic environments provide a challenge or a pressure for young children is being hotly debated, yet there is little empirical research on this topic. This paper presents a subset of data from a two-year comprehensive project designed to examine this question. Parental attitudes and behaviors along with school philosophy and practices comprised the predictor variables used to define "academic environments." This study then focused on how these family and school variables related to child outcome measures of academic competence, creativity, and emotional well-being for 90 prekindergarten children, and a follow-up sample of 56 kindergarten children. The results suggest no academic advantages for children from highly academic environments, and potential disadvantages in creative expression (measured as originality) and emotional well-being (measured as test anxiety and attitudes toward school). Possible interpretations and ramifications of these results are discussed.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1207/s15566935eed0106_1

ISSN: 1040-9289, 1556-6935

Doctoral Dissertation (Ed.D.)

The Influence of Montessori-Based Literacy Instruction and Methods on Reading Achievement of Students in Grades 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7

Available from: Seton Hall University eRepository

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Abstract/Notes: This study examines the influence of Montessori-based literacy curriculum and instruction on student achievement in Grades 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7. I studied 71 matched pairs of urban charter school students (n=142) to determine if there was a statistically significant difference in reading achievement, as measured by the Maryland School Assessment (MSA), between students who were instructed by their teachers in Montessori literacy methods and curriculum and students from a nearby charter school who were instructed by their teachers using a basal reading method. T-tests were used to compare the mean scores of the combined grade levels from each cohort on the 2011-2012 Maryland School Assessment (Reading section). The results of this study suggest that there was no significant difference in reading achievement between the two groups of students. There is very limited empirical research available examining reading achievement in Montessori public charter schools. Further research is recommended with similar groups of students from public Montessori school settings, or in this same setting with a different comparison group or a different evaluation tool.

Language: English

Published: South Orange, New Jersey, 2013

Article

Math Achievement Outcomes Associated with Montessori Education

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: Early Child Development and Care, vol. 191, no. 7/8 (Early Childhood Theorists and Pioneers)

Pages: 1207-1218

Academic achievement, Angeline Stoll Lillard - Writings, Mathematics education - Achievement, Montessori materials, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: The math curriculum of the Montessori system of education for children ages 3–12 is distinctive, incorporating multiple manipulatives and educational practices which have theoretical and empirical support in research. However, studies investigating the math achievement and learning of Montessori students and alumni have not consistently found Montessori programmes to be more effective than conventional or other programmes. Through a detailed review of such studies, we find that a Montessori advantage in math is more likely when programmes adhere to important principles of Montessori education, when students have had longer immersion in Montessori programmes, and when assessments are more conceptual in nature. We suggest that future research should take into account programme fidelity and enrolment duration, and outline other directions for future research. Part of a special issue titled: Early Childhood Theorists and Pioneers

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/03004430.2020.1860955

ISSN: 0300-4430, 1476-8275

Doctoral Dissertation

A Comparison of Traditional vs. Montessori Education in Relation to Children's Self-Esteem, Self-Efficacy, and Prosocial Behavior

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Academic achievement, Americas, Caribbean, Comparative education, Elementary education, Latin America and the Caribbean, Montessori schools, Puerto Rico, Student attitudes

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Abstract/Notes: The present study compares elementary school children from Traditional and Montessori programs. The purpose is to investigate how different educational philosophies and teaching methods affect perceived levels of self-esteem, self-efficacy, prosocial behavior and aggressive behavior in children. The participants in this study consisted of second through sixth grade students who were attending Montessori and Traditional schools since the age of five, or earlier. All children completed the Washington Self-Description Questionnaire (WSDQ), three subscales of the Children's Multi-dimensional Self-Efficacy Scales (i.e., academic achievement, self-regulated learning, & social), the Physical and Verbal Aggression Scale, and the Prosocial Behavior Scale. No significant differences were revealed between the Montessori and Traditional programs in relation to the children's perceived levels of self-esteem, self-efficacy for academic achievement, self-efficacy for self-regulated learning, social self-efficacy, or prosocial behavior. However, the Montessori children reported significantly lower levels of physical/verbal aggression than the Traditional children. Moreover, as Montessori children develop a heightened ability to work within a group of peers, they seem to develop lower levels of physical/verbal aggression, which was not found among Traditional children. Furthermore, Montessori children's perceived ability to make and keep friends of the same gender was found to significantly improve with increased years in the program, which was not found in the Traditional method. For Montessori children, their perceived ability to work together in a group was found to be positively associated with heightened levels of self-efficacy for academic achievement and self-efficacy for self-regulated learning. Furthermore, the Montessori children's levels of self-esteem were correlated significantly with their perceived levels of self-efficacy for academic achievement and self-efficacy for self-regulated learning. Although Traditional children were also found to gain self-efficacy for self-regulated learning through working together at young ages, as they proceed to higher grade levels, their self-efficacy for self-regulated learning decreased.

Language: English

Published: San Juan, Puerto Rico, 2002

Report

An Evaluation of the Relationship between Academic Performance and Physical Fitness Measures in City Montessori Schools

Available from: Social Science Research Network

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between academic achievement and physical fitness in City Montessori Schools. Data from the academic year 2004-2005 Fitnessgram were compared to reading, mathematics and science scores on the Health Standards Test (CST) of 253 elementary schools in the Orange County School District. Physical education teachers from the 10 lowest scoring and 10 highest scoring schools were interviewed regarding content of the physical education classes in their school. Simple correlation coefficients revealed a positive linear relationship between academic scores and physical fitness scores. The interview with the teachers revealed that most of the 10 lowest scoring schools did not have a designated physical education teacher. All of the 10 highest scoring schools had designated physical education teachers and followed the physical education guidelines recommended by the Lucknow Education Board.

Language: English

Published: Rochester, NY, Mar 27, 2013

Article

การบริหารงานวิชาการด้านกิจกรรมเสริมประสบการณ์ตามแนวคิดแบบมอนเตสซอรี่ ของโรงเรียนสังกัดสำนักงานคณะกรรมการการศึกษาขั้นพื้นฐานจังหวัดเชียงใหม่ [Academic Administration in Experience Enhancement Activities based on Montessori Concepts of Schools under the Office of Basic Education Commission, Chiang Mai Province]

Available from: Thai Journals Online

Publication: Journal of Roi Et Rajabhat University, vol. 13, no. 3

Pages: 104-114

Asia, Montessori method of education, Southeast Asia, Thailand

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this research was to: 1) study the academic administration status in the activities to enhance experiences based on Montessori concept of early childhood schools under the Office of Basic Education Commission, Chiang Mai Province by using PDCA 2 process ) Develop an academic administration manual for activities that enhance the experience based on Montessori concepts of early childhood schools under the office Using the PDCA process. The target population used in this study is school administrators. Primary teachers Parents of early childhood students in the number of 90 people. The tools used in the research are the questionnaire, summary form, group meeting (Work Shop), suitability assessment and feasibility of the manual. And an academic administration manual on activities that enhance the experience based on Montessori concepts Analyze data by analyzing and synthesizing content The research found that State of academic administration in activities to enhance experiences based on Montessori concepts of early childhood schools under the Office of the Basic Education Commission, Chiang Mai Province Academic administration is conducted according to the PDCA cycle, which covers academic work in curriculum development at the early childhood level of 2017in terms of learning experience. In the development of instructional media Development assessment With the highest level of operation But still lacking cooperation from all parties in a systematic way, making academic administration in some schools not achieving the goal as expected Therefore, the group meeting to find the results of the development of the academic administration manual according to Montessori concept is carried out according to the PDCA cycle and the rules are clearly defined. For use in the administration of academic administration at the early childhood level of schools under the Office of Basic Education Commission, Chiang Mai Province

Language: Thai

ISSN: 2673-0731

Master's Thesis

The Extent That Montessori Programs Contribute to Students' Academic and Social Gains and How Montessori Programs Differ from Traditional Programs

Available from: Google Scholar

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this paper, through a review of current research, is to compare and contrast the Montessori Method and traditional programs and to identify the extent of the social and academic benefit from each. Researchers have found that there are some academic advantages to both programs. However, the academic gains that a child makes in traditional prekindergarten programs appear to diminish as the child gets older. Socially, children who have attended Montessori programs appear to enjoy school and have better relationships with peers and teachers than those in traditional program. An important thing to note is much of this research is inconclusive because of sampling bias due to study design. It is my recommendation that some of the aspects of Montessori education be incorporated into the traditional programs and that this continue as a supplement to the regular school day. Perhaps if students continue to be provided with additional support as they are in prekindergarten, the academic gains experienced as a result could be longer lasting.

Language: English

Published: Marquette, Michigan, 2009

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