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949 results

Article

Objectively Measured Sedentary Behavior in Preschool Children: Comparison Between Montessori and Traditional Preschools

Available from: BioMed Central

Publication: The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, vol. 10, no. 2

Pages: Article 2

Americas, Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: Background This study aimed to compare the levels of objectively-measured sedentary behavior in children attending Montessori preschools with those attending traditional preschools. Methods The participants in this study were preschool children aged 4 years old who were enrolled in Montessori and traditional preschools. The preschool children wore ActiGraph accelerometers. Accelerometers were initialized using 15-second intervals and sedentary behavior was defined as <200 counts/15-second. The accelerometry data were summarized into the average minutes per hour spent in sedentary behavior during the in-school, the after-school, and the total-day period. Mixed linear regression models were used to determine differences in the average time spent in sedentary behavior between children attending traditional and Montessori preschools, after adjusting for selected potential correlates of preschoolers’ sedentary behavior. Results Children attending Montessori preschools spent less time in sedentary behavior than those attending traditional preschools during the in-school (44.4. min/hr vs. 47.1 min/hr, P = 0.03), after-school (42.8. min/hr vs. 44.7 min/hr, P = 0.04), and total-day (43.7 min/hr vs. 45.5 min/hr, P = 0. 009) periods. School type (Montessori or traditional), preschool setting (private or public), socio-demographic factors (age, gender, and socioeconomic status) were found to be significant predictors of preschoolers’ sedentary behavior. Conclusions Levels of objectively-measured sedentary behavior were significantly lower among children attending Montessori preschools compared to children attending traditional preschools. Future research should examine the specific characteristics of Montessori preschools that predict the lower levels of sedentary behavior among children attending these preschools compared to children attending traditional preschools.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1186/1479-5868-10-2

ISSN: 1479-5868

Article

Nurturing the Child's Spirit through Literature: An African-American Resource Guide

Publication: The National Montessori Reporter, vol. 29, no. 1

Pages: 26–31

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Language: English

Book

Use of American Montessori Materials with Learning Disabled Children

American Montessori Society (AMS), Learning disabled children, Montessori materials, Montessori method of education

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Language: English

Published: Boston: [s.n.], 1974

Doctoral Dissertation

Where Have All the Children Gone? A Case Study of Three American Preschools

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: In sociological investigation, Weber (1968) believes that concrete historical events can be interpreted in terms of social action. These patterns of action differ from historical accounts, which explore the importance of causal explanation of individual events. Entwistle and Alexander (1993) contend that sociologists of education have paid little attention to patterns of class interaction and inequality in preschools. Adding to Hartley's (1993) work on nursery schools in Scotland, and using an organizational model with a sociohistorical standpoint, this ethnographic case study helps to bridge that gap by concentrating on the historical and ecological contexts of (1) a Laboratory school; (2) a Montessori school; and, (3) a Head Start center. The central problem of the study seeks an answer to the question "If inequalities in preschools exist, what do they look like?" This study assumes that historically educational systems have exerted a form of social control over children in order to transmit cultural values. Part I of the study examines ancient and modern societies, their cultures and their philosophical grounding to reveal the values and trends that contribute to social change in the early education of children. Part II adds a triangulation strategy to explore the ecology (environment and culture) of the three schools in the study. These strategies include archival content analysis of the preschool organizations, nonparticipant observation of the classrooms (Bell, 1993), intensive interviewing of the staff and administration members and a brief survey of the preschool parents. This study draws from the sociology of Weber's "ideal bureaucracy," Berger's "bureaucratic cognitive style," Elias' "civilizing process," Bernstein's "visible and invisible" pedagogy, Bourdieu's "cultural capital" and Anyon's "biased ideological messages." In this exploratory study, the data analysis uses a descriptive methodology, not to draw conclusions, but similar to Glaser and Strauss' "grounded theory" to introduce questions to be explored further by researchers. A final section on policy recommendations is included.

Language: English

Published: Boston, Massachusetts, 2000

Article

Spaces for Children: Listing to Young Children about Their Early Childhood Environments

Publication: Montessori International, vol. 84

Pages: 16–17

⛔ No DOI found

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Language: English

ISSN: 1470-8647

Article

Interaction of Children with and without Communication Disorders Using Montessori Activities for the Tablet

Available from: SpringerLink

Publication: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, vol. 25

Pages: 495-507

Children with disabilities, Communicative disorders in children, Inclusive education, Montessori method of education, Montessori method of education, People with disabilities

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Abstract/Notes: Mobile technologies used for education may offer advantages for children with Communication Disorders, among which we can find language disorders and speech disorders, which are identified in DSM-V. In this research, we have introduced two educational activities, “Matching Cards” and “Cards & Sounds”, based on the Montessori Method and which deal with the first stages of reading and writing. We have tested these two activities with children with and without Communication Disorders in order to study how they interact. These groups of children use a Tablet to perform the two activities, which vary in visual and auditory stimuli. The activities employ two touch interactions: tap and drag & drop. Based on Montessori, the activity and the interaction do not produce either positive or negative feedback. The analysis performed with the variables of time, interaction and mistake has shown that children from both groups change their efficiency of use. Differences regarding the interaction of children with and without Communication Disorders have also been observed. Additionally, children with Communication Disorders need additional strategies as explicit indicators in the interaction which may be a guide to be able to carry out specific actions.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s00779-020-01471-7

ISSN: 1617-4909, 1617-4917

Book Section

Written Language: The Old Methods of Teaching Reading and Writing; My First Experiments with Defective Children; First Experiments with Normal Children

Book Title: The Discovery of the Child

Pages: 199-216

Maria Montessori - Writings

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Abstract/Notes: Formerly entitled The Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in the Children's Houses. This book was first published in 1909 under the title 'Il Metodo della Pedagogia Scientifica Applicato all'Educazione Infantile nelle Case dei Bambini' ('The Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in the Children's Houses) and was revised in 1913, 1926, and 1935. Maria Montessori revised and reissued this book in 1948 and renamed it 'La Scoperta del Bambino'. This edition is based on the 6th Italian edition of 'La Scoperta del Bambino' published by the Italian publisher Garzanti, Milan, Italy in 1962. M. J. Costelloe, S. J. translated this Italian version into the English language in 1967 for Fides Publishers, Inc. In 2016 Fred Kelpin edited this version and added many footnotes. He incorporated new illustrations based on AMI-blueprints of the materials currently in use.

Language: English

Published: Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company, 2017

ISBN: 978-90-79506-38-5

Series: The Montessori Series , 2

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effects of a Peace Curriculum on Reducing and Resolving Conflicts Among Children Ages 3-6 Years

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research

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Abstract/Notes: An important part of a child’s development is learning how to relate to other children appropriately (Sidorowicz & Hair, 2009). The purpose of this study was to determine whether teaching children about peace would help them to reduce or resolve conflicts in the classroom. The study took place in a suburban Montessori classroom of 26 children, ages three to six years. The Research Methodology section of this Action Research report details the peace lessons and materials used in the peace curriculum. The data collection included observations of children’s conflicts and resolutions, conferences with the children and teachers, and children’s journal writings. The results of the study determined that, as the peace curriculum was implemented, there was a clear reduction in the number of daily conflicts among the children. Also, children involved in conflicts shifted from requiring a lot of teacher involvement to resolve their conflicts to needing little or no teacher involvement in the resolution. Suggested further research includes expanding the peace curriculum lessons over the entire year. In addition, further lessons and work could be added.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2015

Doctoral Dissertation

A Comparison of Traditional vs. Montessori Education in Relation to Children's Self-Esteem, Self-Efficacy, and Prosocial Behavior

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

Academic achievement, Americas, Caribbean, Comparative education, Elementary education, Latin America and the Caribbean, Montessori schools, Puerto Rico, Student attitudes

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Abstract/Notes: The present study compares elementary school children from Traditional and Montessori programs. The purpose is to investigate how different educational philosophies and teaching methods affect perceived levels of self-esteem, self-efficacy, prosocial behavior and aggressive behavior in children. The participants in this study consisted of second through sixth grade students who were attending Montessori and Traditional schools since the age of five, or earlier. All children completed the Washington Self-Description Questionnaire (WSDQ), three subscales of the Children's Multi-dimensional Self-Efficacy Scales (i.e., academic achievement, self-regulated learning, & social), the Physical and Verbal Aggression Scale, and the Prosocial Behavior Scale. No significant differences were revealed between the Montessori and Traditional programs in relation to the children's perceived levels of self-esteem, self-efficacy for academic achievement, self-efficacy for self-regulated learning, social self-efficacy, or prosocial behavior. However, the Montessori children reported significantly lower levels of physical/verbal aggression than the Traditional children. Moreover, as Montessori children develop a heightened ability to work within a group of peers, they seem to develop lower levels of physical/verbal aggression, which was not found among Traditional children. Furthermore, Montessori children's perceived ability to make and keep friends of the same gender was found to significantly improve with increased years in the program, which was not found in the Traditional method. For Montessori children, their perceived ability to work together in a group was found to be positively associated with heightened levels of self-efficacy for academic achievement and self-efficacy for self-regulated learning. Furthermore, the Montessori children's levels of self-esteem were correlated significantly with their perceived levels of self-efficacy for academic achievement and self-efficacy for self-regulated learning. Although Traditional children were also found to gain self-efficacy for self-regulated learning through working together at young ages, as they proceed to higher grade levels, their self-efficacy for self-regulated learning decreased.

Language: English

Published: San Juan, Puerto Rico, 2002

Master's Thesis

Comparing the Normalization of Children in Traditional and Montessori Kindergarten

Available from: University of Wisconsin

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Abstract/Notes: In this study, the author examined the level of Normalization kindergarten children display in a Montessori classroom and a traditional classroom. Normalization can be demonstrated through the child’s love of work, concentration, self-discipline and sociability. Data was gathered from the child and lead teacher through classroom observations, teacher questionnaires, child-interviews and a self-control test. Classroom observations in both environments gave insight into the child’s ability to focus and concentrate, as well as observable indications of a love of learning. Teacher questionnaire results were compiled and compared revealing children in Montessori classrooms have more room for choice, multi-sensory material use and more developed literacy skills. The child-interview results indicated that Montessori children were more sociable and self-reliant than traditional school children. Children attending Montessori kindergarten showed a greater level of self-discipline than traditional school children in the self-control test. Ideally, children attending a Montessori children’s house should continue their education for kindergarten into their third and final year. The discussion considers the ongoing benefits of staying in a Montessori environment for the kindergarten year.

Language: English

Published: River Falls, Wisconsin, 2014

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