Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

952 results

Master's Thesis

An Analysis of Early Childhood Development Programmes in South Africa

Available from: University of South Africa - Institutional Repository

Africa, Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa

See More

Abstract/Notes: This study constitutes an attempt to describe and analyse the quality of selected early childhood development programmes in South Africa, and provide criteria by which the quality of programmes could be assessed. The need for, and importance of, providing quality early childhood development programmes is highlighted. The influence of educational pf:lilosophies on programmes is recognised, hence the total development of the child and educational philosophies related thereto are discussed. Factors and components within programmes that contribute to high quality are explored. Moreover, criteria by means of which quality early childhood development programmes may be assessed, are provided. In this regard criteria for the formulation of aims, selection and the organisation of content, assessment, role of the teacher and parent involvement in programmes are suggested. It is against these criteria that selected early childhood development programmes in South Africa are described and analysed. programmes conclude the study.

Language: English

Published: Pretoria, South Africa, 1996

Article

Beyond Developmentalism? Early Childhood Teachers' Understandings of Multiage Grouping in Early Childhood Education and Care

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: Australasian Journal of Early Childhood, vol. 34, no. 4

Pages: 55-63

See More

Abstract/Notes: Postdevelopmental perspectives in early childhood education and care increasingly reference alternative ways of understanding learning, growth and development in early learning. Drawing on these ideas, this paper examines research findings which focused on early childhood teachers' understandings of multiage grouping. The findings suggested that teachers used predominantly developmental approaches to describing their experiences of multiage grouping, and proposed that the use of postdevelopmental perspectives in multiage grouping research has the potential to realise new ways of understanding learning and development as both concepts and practices within the multiage classroom.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/183693910903400408

ISSN: 1836-9391, 1839-5961

Doctoral Dissertation

Everyday Spirituality: Supporting the Spiritual Experience of Young Children in Three Early Childhood Educational Settings

Available from: Massey University - Theses and Dissertations

Australasia, Australia and New Zealand, Child development, Comparative education, Montessori schools, New Zealand, Oceania, Spirituality, Waldorf schools

See More

Abstract/Notes: The focus of this research is the spiritual experience of young children in early childhood educational settings. Spirituality is included in the New Zealand early childhood curriculum, Te Whariki, but is a relatively unarticulated aspect of educational practice. In order to find out how spirituality is supported in early childhood educational contexts this qualitative case study research took place in three early childhood settings: a Montessori casa, a private preschool and a Steiner (Waldorf) kindergarten. The methods used in the research included participant observation, interviews and focus groups. The teachers were asked to make a video about spirituality to reflect their own context and photographs were taken in each setting. The metaphor of spiritual landscape is used in this research. In this landscape everyday experience merged with the spiritual to form the concept of everyday spirituality. The cultural theories of everyday life supported a realisation that ordinary daily activity can become wonderful and mysterious when the spiritual dimension is realised. The themes that emerged from analysis of the case studies are conceptualised as transformative aspects of learning and relationships. They are aspects of everyday spirituality identified as spiritual withness; spiritual inbetweenness; and the spiritually elsewhere. Representing spiritual experience is challenging. The thesis is written in narrative form and contains core narratives as prose and poems. Using writing as a means of discovery made communicating spirituality through the medium of words a possibility. Spirituality is proposed to be an inclusive concept that affirms a sense of connection and this thesis found that all pedagogical practices in early childhood settings have the potential to include a spiritual aspect. In Aotearoa New Zealand many children lead their everyday lives in the context of an early childhood environment that includes teachers and parents as part of that community. This thesis argues that when everyday spirituality permeates early childhood contexts that all aspects of the curriculum are realised and the spiritual experience of everyone connected to that setting is supported.

Language: English

Published: Palmerston North, New Zealand, 2007

Report

The Evaluation and Implications of Research with Young Handicapped and Low-Income Children at the Institute for Research on Exceptional Children at the University of Illinois

Available from: ERIC

Americas, Children with disabilities, Inclusive education, North America, Poor children, United States of America

See More

Abstract/Notes: This study to determine effects of preschool training of mentally retarded children from low-income families asks three major questions: 1. Does preschool training displace the rate of development of such children? 2. Does rate of growth continue at an accelerated rate, or does it return to the original rate of development during primary school years? 3. Are the results similar for children living in different environments? Five intervention programs are outlined: 1. Traditional nursery school; 2. Community Integrated program; 3. The Montessori method; 4. Karnes structured cognitive plan; and 5. The Bereiter-Englemann(B-E). As a result of the program, some children in the demonstration center no longer function in the retarded range. Behavior has improved and several have entered a public school or preschool for normal children. It is suggested that mothers of infants might accomplish more at home with guidance, since professional tutoring is not feasibly practical, and children with higher IQ need special early programming to attain their potential. (RG)

Language: English

Published: Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, 1973

Doctoral Dissertation

Parents and Early Childhood Programs: A Historical Analysis

Available from: ProQuest Dissertations and Theses

See More

Abstract/Notes: Since early childhood programs were first introduced in the United States in the 1820s, early childhood professionals have been aware that teaching and caring for young children involves establishing relationships with their families. This study is a historical examination of the relationships between early childhood programs and parents. The study considered the political, social, and economic factors that have influenced the development of relationships between parents and early childhood programs, including: infant schools; kindergarten; laboratory schools; nursery schools; Montessori programs; day nurseries and child care; and Head Start. The study showed that the history of parent involvement in early childhood programs is essentially the history of early childhood programs. Since the 1820s, early childhood professionals have provided ample literary evidence of how parents were expected to be involved in early childhood programs, and how these expectations were communicated to them. Literary evidence was the basis for this study. Evidence used in the study included: autobiographies, journals, recollections, and letters of key participants; manuals of early childhood practice; proceedings from meetings and conferences; publications from government agencies; articles and commentaries from professional journals and popular magazines; theoretical and practical works by leaders in the field; research studies; textbooks; and childrearing advice books. The history of early childhood programs reveals a wide range of attempts to bring parents and early childhood programs together. At various times and in various contexts, these attempts have been called parent cooperation, parent education, parent participation, parent involvement, and teacher-parent partnership. Throughout most of the history of early childhood programs, parents were cast in the role of learner. More recently, the ideal relationship between parents and early childhood professionals has been characterized as that of a partnership. The various terms that have been used to describe the relationships between parents and early childhood programs were examined through the course of this study, as were the assumptions and beliefs that have influenced the interpretation of these terms.

Language: English

Published: Boston, Massachusetts, 1999

Thesis

Autism in Early Childhood Education Montessori Environments: Parents' and Teachers' Perspectives

Available from: Auckland University of Technology - Institutional Repository

Australasia, Australia and New Zealand, Autism, Special education, Children with disabilities, Montessori method of education, New Zealand, Oceania, Parent and child, Parent-teacher relationships, Special education, Teacher-student relationships

See More

Abstract/Notes: There is very little research about children with Autism in Montessori early childhood education in Aotearoa New Zealand. This study examined parents’ and teachers’ perspectives of children with Autism attending Montessori early childhood education environments. This thesis documents literature that explores and critiques Montessori philosophy and the teaching of children on the Autism spectrum. The purpose of this study was to gain insights into the Montessori teaching approach in early childhood education, as a supportive environment for children with Autism in the early years. However, I discovered that the Montessori environment is less than ideal if the teachers do not understand Autism Spectrum Disorder and do not make allowances for the symptoms that present themselves. It was my intention to explore the factors that complemented both Montessori and the support of children with Autism with an approach that is conducive to learning and encourages positive behavioural patterns. The findings revealed three main indicators being identified as important. These were social competence, language and communication, and individual interests and sensory implications. However, not all findings were positive. The parents all agreed that the teachers needed to be flexible and understanding in their approach, and many Montessori teachers are strict in their routine and are not prepared to sway from their teaching method to assist a child with Autism. This study suggests that Montessori early childhood teachers would benefit from professional development in the areas of including children with special needs, particularly Autism Spectrum Disorder, particularly in regards to understanding the unique characteristics of children with Autism and how they can effectively use the Montessori philosophy, equipment and prepared environment to support each child’s learning and development. Suggestions for future professional learning for Montessori teachers include the provision of professional development in including children with “special needs”, particularly Autism Spectrum Disorder for Montessori early childhood teachers. It is not only the Montessori philosophy and the prepared environment that supports the child with Autism, but the teacher’s awareness of the child’s needs and a willingness to be flexible in their approach.

Language: English

Published: Auckland, New Zealand, 2015

Article

Effect of Montessori on Children Development: Systematic Review

Available from: Research Gate

Publication: Teikyo Medical Journal / Teikyō Igaku Zasshi, vol. 45, no. 1

Pages: 5729-5741

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, Autism, Child development, Montessori method of education - Evaluation

See More

Abstract/Notes: To find the evidence for the effectiveness of Montessori in improving children development. Systematic search was done on the PubMed, Cochrane library, Web of science, PEDro, Scopus and Google Scholar databases till May 2021. Manual search was also done to find relevant studies. Two authors independently assessed retrieved records and studies against the eligibility criteria specified for this review, then extracted data from the included studies and assess studies methodological quality by using the methodological index for non-randomized studies (MINOR) scale for the clinical studies and the national institute of health (NIH) tool for observational designs. Eighteen studies were included; fifteen on normal children and three on children with communication disorders, autism and attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD). Quality of 5 clinical studies rated as moderate and 7 was poor, while the quality of 5 observational studies was fair and only 1 was poor. These included studies have different outcomes including gross and fine motor skills, executive function, activity of daily living and cognitive skills. Meta-analysis was not appropriate because of the included studies heterogeneity descriptive analysis indicated that Montessori seems to be effective in improving child development. Based on this review findings the present evidence promise an effective role of Montessori for improving child development. More well-designed primary studies are recommended to find clear evidence.

Language: English

ISSN: 0387-5547

Article

A Systemic Model of Furniture Meant for Stimulating Development of a Child

Available from: Index Copernicus International

Publication: Annals of Warsaw University of Life Sciences SGGW - Forestry and Wood Technology, vol. 113

Pages: 13-19

See More

Abstract/Notes: In furniture design, understood as a kind of evolutionary process, there is room for designer’s creativity, but not in the sense traditionally accepted in the psychology of creation. The creativity of the designer shapes the products of the evolutionary algorithm but does not replace them. This can be illustrated by the genesis of any design, such as furniture that stimulates the development of the child. The Montessori pedagogy leaves a lot of room for new designs of Montessorian teaching aids. The Montessori didactic material forms a logically structured whole. It enables the child to move out of experience and sensual cognition; it serves not only the development of the intellect but also the education of the whole personality. The Montessorian materials take into account the child’s stage of development, corresponding to a given sensitive phase and the very logic of things, so that the child, while learning, can embrace larger cognitive sequences, arouse a sense of aesthetics, motivation, curiosity and interest, thus triggering various forms of activity.

Language: English

DOI: 10.5604/01.3001.0015.2327

ISSN: 1898-5912, 2719-6518

Article

The Origins and Development of Child-Centred Education: Implications for Classroom Management

Available from: Sabinet African Journals

Publication: Educare (South Africa), vol. 32, no. 1-2

Pages: 222-239

Africa, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - History, South Africa, Southern Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, ⛔ No DOI found

See More

Abstract/Notes: Since 1994 far-reaching curriculum changes in the form of an Outcomes-based Education (OBE) approach to schooling have been put into practice in South Africa. One of the pillars of OBE is a child (learner)-centred approach, that has an impact on virtually every aspect of classroom management. The question that arises is: what is a child-centred approach and what are its implications for classroom management? This article traces the broad issues surrounding the origins of a child-centred approach and investigates the implications of the implementation of a child-centred approach for classroom management. It concludes that child-centred teaching is still more rhetoric than reality in South Africa, because of certain constraints faced by educators. Constraints educators have to deal with in their classrooms, such as class size and inadequate training label education as child-conscious rather than child-centred.

Language: English

ISSN: 0256-8829

Article

Frequency of Six Early Childhood Education Approaches: A 10-year Content Analysis of Early Childhood Educational Journal

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: Early Childhood Education Journal, vol. 34, no. 5

Pages: 301

See More

Abstract/Notes: The frequency of early childhood education approaches spanning 10 years of publications was investigated. A content analysis of publications (N = 492) from Early Childhood Education Journal was conducted. From a previous content analysis six approaches or search words were identified: Bank Street, Head Start, High/Scope, Montessori, Reggio Emilia, and Waldorf. Overall, the current content analysis demonstrated that the Head Start approach most frequently appeared. The results indicate that approaches vary as to their frequency of appearance and that contributors of Early Childhood Education Journal have investigated, reflected upon, and expanded upon approaches to educating young children to different degrees. This finding may be beneficial to future contributors of Early Childhood Education Journal. In addition, we have provided a brief overview of each approach that early childhood professionals may use to aid parents with their early childhood education enrollment decisions.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/s10643-006-0080-4

ISSN: 1082-3301, 1573-1707

Advanced Search