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382 results

Doctoral Dissertation

Success and Failure in Five Different Programs of Preschool Intervention With Culturally Disadvantaged Children

Available from: University of Illinois - IDEALS

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Language: English

Published: Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, 1969

Book Section

Montessori with the Culturally Disadvantaged: A Cognitive-Developmental Interpretation and Some Research Findings

Available from: Books to Borrow @ Internet Archive

Book Title: Early Education: Current Theory, Research, and Action

Pages: 105-118

African American community, African Americans, Americas, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

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Language: English

Published: Chicago: Aldine Pub. Co., 1968

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

Culturally Congruent Education and the Montessori Model: Perspectives from Hawaiian Culture-based Educators

Available from: American Montessori Society

Americas, Culturally responsive teaching, Indigenous communities, Indigenous peoples, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America, United States of America

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Abstract/Notes: The purpose of this study was to investigate why some Hawaiian language and culturebased (HLCB) educators perceived the Montessori approach to be congruent with their goals and values and to determine the salient features of the Montessori approach used by HLCB teachers who received Montessori training. Interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with 40 HLCB participants, including 15 key informants who had at least 180 hours of Montessori training. Data also included classroom and school visits and analyses of school documents. Data analysis revealed six themes and two linkages that related the themes and their elements. Four themes were related to why HLCB educators have perceived the Montessori approach to be congruent with their values and goals. These were (a) similar views regarding their work as a lifestyle, (b) common pedagogical practices, (c) shared values and beliefs as educators, and (d) an overlapping world-view. One theme described the distinctions between the approaches. The final theme included challenges to implementing and maintaining HLCB programs. The findings suggest that researchers and teacher educators interested in culturally congruent education should take into account the underlying world-view of both the research paradigm and the participants involved, and that school reform should be comprehensive, culturally congruent, and generated from within communities and other stakeholders. They also indicate that culturally congruent, place-based education may enhance academic self-efficacy and could serve as a bridge between seemingly disparate educational approaches.

Language: English

Published: Manoa, Hawaii, 2006

Report

The Effects of Montessori Educational Techniques on Culturally Disadvantaged Head Start Children

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: To determine whether significant differences exist in skill performance as a result of head start experience and to determine whether these differences exist between two ethnic groups, 17 Anglo-American [White] and 62 Mexican American [Latino] culturally disadvantaged children were pre-tested and post-tested during the summer of 1965 in connection with six-week head start programs in Costa Mesa and Fullerton, California. Five teachers using modified Montessori materials stressed three developmental areas, (1) perceptual-motor, (2) social-emotional, and (3) intellectual-academic. Seven instruments were used to test the program's effectiveness--Gesell Maturation Index, Mateer Inversion Test, tests of dominance, teacher rating scale, Goodenough-Harris D-A-P, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, and wide range achievement test. Results showed that certain handicaps do exist among culturally disadvantaged children prior to school experience and that positive gains occurred when enrichment experiences were provided. Greatest gains were in the areas of intellectual-academic and social-emotional skills. Ethnic differences appeared in the linguistic skills limitations of the Mexican American children. Need for medical and dental attention was apparent in both groups. Future provision should be made for continued preschool education and wider dissemination of health services. (LG)

Language: English

Published: Fullerton, California, Sep 1965

Master's Thesis (Action Research Report)

The Effect of a Culturally Diverse Art Curriculum on the Early Childhood Student's Cultural Competency

Available from: St. Catherine University

Action research, Art education, Montessori method of education

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Abstract/Notes: This action research project was completed to test the effects of a culturally diverse art program on early childhood students’ cultural competency. The setting was a Montessori early childhood classroom of 22 children. There were two Asian students, one African American student, and 19 Caucasian students. Data were collected using a student conference form, self-portrait rubric, and tally sheets - continent symbol matching, group discussions and art activities. A group presentation took place each week about an artist from one the six inhabited continents which included a biography and examples of their artwork. Following the presentation an art activity was placed on the art shelf. The results showed that the program had a positive impact on the students’ cultural competency. This program will continue to evolve by interweaving it with other cultural curricula in the classroom and spending more than one week with each artist and activity.

Language: English

Published: St. Paul, Minnesota, 2022

Article

Culturally Sensitive Practice and the Spiritual Embryo

Available from: ProQuest

Publication: Montessori Life, vol. 31, no. 4

Pages: 48-53

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Abstract/Notes: After the physical growth that occurs in utero is complete, so begins the psychic development of the infant and toddler in the first 3 years of life. According to the American Sociological Association, culture is defined as "the languages, customs, beliefs, rules, arts, knowledge, and collective identities and memories developed by members of all social groups that make their social environments meaningful" (http://www.asanet.org). Some concrete examples of culture just happen to be a few things that infants and toddlers absolutely love: language, food, art, music, dance, and stories. In my years as an Infant & Toddler teacher, my task had been to create an appropriate environment for children living in a progressive university town in central New York.

Language: English

ISSN: 1054-0040

Article

Montessori: More Culturally Responsive

Available from: MontessoriPublic

Publication: Montessori Public, vol. 5, no. 3

Pages: 1, 14

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Language: English

Article

Culturally Responsive Literacy

Available from: MontessoriPublic

Publication: Montessori Public, vol. 3, no. 1

Pages: 3, 20-21

Public Montessori

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Language: English

Article

The Montessori Approach to Culturally Diverse Curriculum

Publication: Point of Interest, vol. 7, no. 7

Pages: 1–3

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Language: English

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Using Mathematics Strategies in Early Childhood Education as a Basis for Culturally Responsive Teaching in India

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: International Journal of Early Years Education, vol. 14, no. 1

Pages: 15-34

Asia, Culturally responsive teaching, India, South Asia

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Abstract/Notes: The objective of this small study was to elicit responses from early childhood teachers in India on mathematics learning strategies and to measure the extent of finger counting technique adopted by the teachers in teaching young children. Specifically, the research focused on the effective ways of teaching mathematics to children in India, and examined teachers’ approach to number counting. In India, children were taught by their parents or by their teachers to use fingers to count. The qualitative study conducted by the researcher further enriched the topic with first‐hand comments by the teachers. Although the finger counting method was not the only process that teachers would adopt, it was embedded in the culture and taken into consideration while infusing mathematics skills. The teachers confirmed adopting the Indian method of finger counting in their teaching strategy; some specified that the method helped children to undertake addition and subtraction of carrying and borrowing, as counting by objects could not be available all the time. Although the study is limited by its small sample to the unique mathematics learning experience in India, it provides readers with a glimpse of culturally responsive teaching methods and an alternative mathematics teaching strategy.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/09669760500446374

ISSN: 0966-9760

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